Monterey Agri Fos for Fireblight?

alh_in_flFebruary 26, 2013

I have another thread about growing quinces in Florida-- and learned they are subject to fireblight in this area.

After my most recent post, I was just looking at the label for Monterey Agri-Fos systemic fungicide and noticed it says it can be used as a foliar spray for fireblight.

I have the Agri-Fos because I used it to save two near-dead loquats from an advanced case of phytophthora collar rot (It worked great!! The Ag Extension office told me the loquats were doomed but they were wrong!)

Anyway, I was thinking maybe I might try spraying a bit of Agri-Fos on the quinces as a preventative measure for fireblight. Has anyone tried this and did it help?

Thanks,
Ann

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Scott F Smith(6B/7A MD)

Ann, there hasn't been much study of the different phosphorous-based compounds for fireblight but a few studies did show some effectiveness. I have used Serenade, copper, and agrimycin on my fireblight problem. It still didn't fix my quince problem and the copper and agrimycin are considered more effective than phosphorous compounds (and Serenade). So while it could help to spray it I would more importantly use one of these two more powerful materials. Another important thing to do is prune the tree very open, with fewer branches it dries out more quickly and there will be more direct sun to kill bacteria.

Scott

    Bookmark   February 26, 2013 at 1:29PM
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john_in_sc

You can certainly give it a go...

I tried spraying a Phosphite product (I think K-phite) on my Apples that were suffering Fireblight... Didn't do anything from what I can tell... at least NOT once it was already infected.....

I won't tell you that it isn't effective... but the key in this case is that it's NOT a Fungicide like Streptomyicin or like a "Chemical" fungicide... It works more along the lines like an "Organic" type fungicidal products....

If you want to give it a crack - start applying it now... You need the balance in the tissue of the plant for it to work.... and perhaps an ounce of prevention might be worth a pound of cure...

Thanks

    Bookmark   February 26, 2013 at 5:08PM
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Scott F Smith(6B/7A MD)

John, the phosphate materials I have looked into work like peroxide or baking soda on diseases: they deliver some immediate killing upon contact and are gone in a day or so. So, the time to spray is when things are "heating up" (both literally and figuratively), when the fireblight danger zone is approaching as temps warm in spring. If you want to be really accurate, look into one of the fireblight models such as Cougarblight - it tells you when fireblight is likely to strike so you can get out and zap it right before it cascades.

Part of the great difficulty of fireblight is the when to spray, not just the what to spray. Unlike bugs there is no annual cycle / degree days, its based on recent weather patterns.

Scott

    Bookmark   February 27, 2013 at 8:38AM
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john_in_sc

Not sure if we are talking about the same thing or not....

Phosphite is different from Phosphate.... Generally, Phosphate doesn't do anything for fungus/disease... Phosphite is different stuff altogether.... and has been shown to help...

This stuff seems to have to be absorbed into the plant - and that's where Topical/foliar apps seem to work better.... faster absorption....

From what I have read and seen first hand.. This stuff doesn't really do much once you have an active infection.... but it works quite well at helping to "Harden off" tissue so it's harder to infect....

That's where I liken it to other "Biological" solutions... It's gotta already be there... and then you will likely see less infection or no infection....

I can attest that it doesn't work like a Fungicide when sprayed on stuff that's already heavily infected/colonized..... You might possibly see a faster recovery from infection.... but I think it's dicey to think of this stuff as a solution to replace a product like Agri-myicin....

Thanks

    Bookmark   February 27, 2013 at 10:24AM
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