Pineapple Orange tree Question

ralph31558(z8GA)April 3, 2007

I have a pineapple orange tree which i bought about 4 years ago,it has grown to about 5 ft. wide by 6 ft high, and this year i had to trim off some of the top because i did not want it to grow to high. The tree looks to be very strong and the leaves have a nice green color. Will this type of tree ever start to produce? if so, when can i start looking for buds? My other orange tree alwready has lots of flowers. Is the growing habit of the pineapple orange so much different?

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dghays(Z10A FL Brevard)

I assume you didn't trim the lower branches. My pineapple orange is flowering, but citrus can flower at different times from each other, each tree can be variable. Has the tree never flowered? I'm surprised it could make it in zone 8.

Gary

    Bookmark   April 3, 2007 at 7:09PM
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ralph31558(z8GA)

It has not flowered yet. And should i have trimed the lower branches?

    Bookmark   April 4, 2007 at 12:53AM
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dghays(Z10A FL Brevard)

Just making sure you didn't prune the whole tree, and that being the reason it hasn't flowered. Its highly unusual that by now it didn't flower. Can you verify where the graft on the plant is, and that there isn't growth coming from below it? That's the only reason I could think of for it not to flower. That the rootstock (which was grown from seed) has taken over the plant.

Gary

    Bookmark   April 4, 2007 at 6:58AM
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ralph31558(z8GA)

dghays

Now wouldn't that be something? I will have to check it out. If so, it will be 4 years wasted.

    Bookmark   April 5, 2007 at 12:25AM
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dghays(Z10A FL Brevard)

Here's an important tidbit. I've never witnessed it to this degree myself:

Citrus Often Inconsistent Bloomers
Posted on Mar 27, 2007 10:25:01 PM
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When it comes to citrus trees, gardeners are often optimists. The trees can grow as old as we do, yet we usually expect them to be producers at a very early age. The truth is citrus trees are often inconsistent bloomers.

Most likely some of the optimism and hope for the very first fruits come from trees that are purchased in containers, often with flowers and citrus present. Then, they are expected to continue the displays when planted in the ground. Most trees, however, do just the opposite and stop producing for several years.

You see, while they are in the containers, their roots are limited, growth is reduced and flowering is encouraged. Some of these blooms just naturally develop into fruits. When the tree is planted in your landscape, it is free to grow and seems to forget about flowering and fruiting for a while. Some new trees can go 5 to 7 years in your yard without a single bloom.

Actually, even if the trees do begin to flower early and set fruits, we suggest you pick these early citrus for the first three years. This is hard for many gardeners to do, but it results in larger trees that can bear a better crop later on. Also, many of the early fruits are atypical, being dry inside or having little flavor.

Now, even though a tree begins flowering and fruiting, it doesn't mean it's going to bear a bumper crop every year. One year might be heavy, and another might have few if any fruits. Don't get discouraged, as your tree is just resting and building up reserves to produce the next great crop. Your job is to continue normal care that includes the following:

Feed citrus trees over three years of age once in March, May, August and early October.
Apply a citrus fertilizer at the rate of 1/4 pound for each inch of tree circumference measured 6 inches above the ground.
Scatter the fertilizer under the spread of the branches and out past the drip line.
Water once or twice a week to maintain a moist soil during hot, dry weather.
Control pests only as needed; many can be tolerated.

    Bookmark   April 5, 2007 at 11:09AM
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ralph31558(z8GA)

dghays
Thank you for that great info.

    Bookmark   April 6, 2007 at 12:04AM
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fontenotgreta_yahoo_com

My tree is approximately 2 years in the ground. It has never flowered or produced fruit. It is approx. 4 to 5 feet tall and about 4 feet wide. It looks healthy. Please let me know when I can expect fruit. Thanks.

    Bookmark   February 28, 2011 at 4:13PM
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