Bamboo

beetreeApril 11, 2014

Is there a cold hardy construction bamboo for zone five?

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
larry_gene

Bamboo forum might be of help.

    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 10:35PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canadianplant

phyllostachys parvifolia or virila. they are probably the closest thing you'll find for zone five. you should double check how hardy the culms are.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 12:34AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
drew51 SE MI Z5b/6a

I like the clumping types as they don't spread out of control a few that are to zone five, check out Bamboo garden.
Here is mine a Fargesia sp. 'Scabrida' Zone 6!

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 3:11AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lkz5ia

Not reliable in zone 5.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 12:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
drew51 SE MI Z5b/6a

"Not reliable in zone 5."

Yes, the one I have but a few clumping types are, go to Bamboo Garden to see them. FYI mine took -14 degrees F without a problem.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 12:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Hardy clumpers don't make big culms.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 12:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
drew51 SE MI Z5b/6a

"Hardy clumpers don't make big culms."

Yeah I guess if you want to use the bamboo for fishing poles or something? Here is Fargesia Murielae Zone 5-9

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 3:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
drew51 SE MI Z5b/6a

If you try the running type, this could happen to you!

Here is a link that might be useful: Running Bamboo

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 3:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lkz5ia

Nice video, that is one of the best species for zone 5.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 9:09PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canadianplant

There are harder plants to control then bamboo, especially in zone 5. I am in zone 4 and its taken 4 years for it to even get to 6 feet, and almost no spread at all (so far, Im aware of the possibilities ). Its barely spread over 2 feet.

The best bamboo for zone 5, as drew showed are probably some species of Fargesia.

The ones I mentioned above are generally new in popularity so there isnt a lot of information. People in colder zones have good reports so far.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 10:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lkz5ia

Not all zone 5's are equal. My zone 5, Phyllostachys genus is the best.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2014 at 11:42PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
drew51 SE MI Z5b/6a

"Not all zone 5's are equal. My zone 5, Phyllostachys genus is the best."

I have to agree with you. The clumping does grow slow in colder zones, but the running tends to grow too fast in warmer zones. If you had to remove it, would it be hard to do? We have phragmites here that are a pain and have killed off most of the cat tails.
I just want a small ornamental bush, and the clumping types are cool. Beautiful looking too. The one I have has gorgeous orange culms. One that looks great is black cherry.

I agree about the statement about zones. My zone 6 is cold, compared to zone 6 in TN! We get a lot less rain too.
We had 13 days below zero this winter. With -14 being the coldest. 4 days were double digit below zero. That will never happen in TN or MO, which both have zone 6 areas too. So we got zone 5 cold, at times. If you look at SE MI, it is a zone 6 surrounded by zone 5. The Great Lakes keep us slightly warmer...sometimes! How many zone 6's have a zone 5 south of them? We do!

Phyllostachys would grow well here, but I'm not willing to put up barriers to contain it, and I would have to do that.

My wife was mad at me for buying bamboo, then she saw
the 'Scabrida' and fell in love with it. She told me she had no idea it was so beautiful.

Here is a link that might be useful: Black Cherry

This post was edited by Drew51 on Sun, Apr 13, 14 at 1:57

    Bookmark   April 13, 2014 at 1:48AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Rob_343(6B/7A)

I am just bundling up the last of the bamboo (unknown type, but running) cut down in my yard. I believe my entire cul de sac was a bamboo grove before development in the mid '60s. I can empathize with the guy in the video with the sad face holding a clump of roots. I removed the roots from a 15' x 4' section-- it took me a day and a half. This was on the edge of it's growth, so it wasn't even the densest root system of what I have. The rest, I just cut down and will remove any shoots and pray the roots die off.

From my experience, trying to contain it by cutting back the areas where you don't want it doesn't work. The rhizomes continue to run out and it seems to push new growth on top of what is already there, making an incredibly dense mass of roots and shoots where you do want it. I would guess that walling it off would have the same impact-- minus the rhizomes running. It really wants to spread. I have seen runners climb over walls and would guess they would go pretty low to get under walls too.

I'm in a zone 7, but food for thought if you are thinking of planting any.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2014 at 11:06AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canadianplant

The thing about bamboo is that "survival" temps are anything but simple....

For instance, Phyllostachys areosulcata is usually rated hardy to -25C. That is for the roots. You will have severe leaf loss and die back in those temps. It gets leaf damage around -15C and starts to die back between the aformentioned temps.

Zone 5 according to the usda is -29C. This will/more then likely top kill almost any phyllostachys. The only Fargesia I know of that has taken those temps is F nitida, and maurielae. Rufa is hardy but not quite as the above. The leaves fry around -18C.

Zone 6 is your best chance for full survival with phyllostachys, unless you decide to bent it down and tarp it under heavy mulch. Of course micro climates come into play and length of cold as well as snow pack.

If you are in zone 5 and even some zone 6 areas with little snow fall the odds are it wont spread too aggressively. Once you protect the roots then it will have the protection to spread.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2014 at 6:18PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Trimming overgrown avocado tree then graft?
Dear gardenweb community, I am hoping to hear some...
funlul
New orchard...planting between rows
I'm planting a 30 tree apple orchard this spring in...
fernstone118
Zone 5 fruit and nut trees Northeast, Nebraska
Hello, I have an acreage near Allen, NE and I would...
cheeta64
Will these plum tree buds be damaged by frosts we will have next week
This is my bruce plum tree. The buds have started to...
tlbean2004
Early-Spring and General Spray Questions for 4-yr old Maryland Orchard
Hi all, I planted the following fruit trees in Spring...
lindsgardeninmd
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™