Discovered a thornless raspberry in my garden.

nullzero(9)May 10, 2010

I was studying the new seedling raspberry plants that popped up in a container from birds eating the raspberries. I noticed what seems like two thornless raspberry seedlings. I am not exactly sure what the seedlings were crossed with but the majority of my garden was Caroline Raspberry with a smaller section of Anne, and Autumn Bliss. I also have blackberries and Boysenberry.

I am going to keep a close watch on the plants to see how they perform. Ultimately the harvest quality of fruit and amount will determine if its worth keeping the raspberry around.

Just wanted to know if Thornless trait in raspberries is rare or pretty common occurrence?

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fruitgirl

It's fairly rare, since raspberry thorns are nothing like blackberry thorns, raspberry breeders place less importance on thornlessness than blackberry breeders do. Also, the types that have fewer or very, very fine thorns sometimes have to be a bit further out of the seedling stage to "grow" them.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2010 at 4:53PM
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nullzero(9)

I will take some pictures sometime next week when it gains a little more height.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2010 at 5:20PM
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ericwi

Our everbearing red raspberries send out lots of volunteers, and they all have thorns. I think a thornless raspberry would attract some attention, if the quality of the fruit is good.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2010 at 6:17PM
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jellyman(6/7VA)

Nullzero:

Because you have other caneberries around, and leaf types are similar at the early stages of growth, it might be premature to conclude you are growing a raspberry at all, much less a thornless raspberry. As you note, the test will be to let it grow up and fruit to see what it produces.

As Fruitgirl mentions, thorns on raspberries are often not much more than sharp fuzz, and not considered a problem to be solved. The "thorns" on my emerging Bababerries are not much more than fine hairs, and very difficult to see.

Don Yellman, Great Falls, VA

    Bookmark   May 10, 2010 at 10:41PM
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nullzero(9)

jellyman,

Yeah I have not ruled out the other cane berries. However comparison of the leaves shows it extremely similar to the caroline raspberries.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 12:13AM
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swaine

i try and grow out about 100 raspberry seedlings a year from named cultivars, its amazing the variation of seedlings that pop up, (and verying degress of hardiness, cane grow height,cane colour
from yellow parents, red berried seedlings show up, aswell as yellow,
from yellow parent ive had orange berried seedlings show up, its great fun to see what they produce,
i have found that THORNLESS RASPBERRY parents will produce A PERCENTAGE OF THORNLESS SEEDLINGS this year from veriety called glen doll(thornless) all 25 seedlings are THORNLESS,
i found a very tall growing raspberry in a local wood easily 12ft canes which were sparcley thorny i have grown out 20 seedlings ( 4 of which completly THORNLESS)the other 16 were more thorny than the wild parent,
could be from one of the other cane fruit, i have produce thornless and thorny loganberries from a thornless parent
stew

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 5:31PM
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