grafting observations

bruce2288June 2, 2012

I grafted 30 varieties on 30 rootstalks. 5 each B9,G11,G16,G30,MM111 and B118. Mostly whip and tongue, a few cleft and bark grafts. Beyond my wildest expectations all scions leafed out and grew. I almost gave up on dabinett and one other variety but about 2 weeks after the rest they leafed out. Scions on bud9 and bud118 were the slowest to respond. I have no idea why.

I grafted at various heights on the rootstock to have the best diameter match any where from 6" to a foot.

I rubbed off growing buds on the rootstocks in the befief that that would encourage the growth of the scion. Right or wrong? 4 out of 5 scions on the G-30 the leaves have died, the one surviving and looking great did not get the rootstock buds removed, why I don't know. On doing some research to find if G30 has some compatibility issues, I found a statement to allow G30 to grow untill scion is well established. Comments?

Rootstocks on fairled grafts are still green, so will try to regraft but there seem to no viable budding growth on them.

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Scott F Smith(6B/7A MD)

Bruce, if the rootstocks are freshly planted this year then there can be a reason to keep a nurse shoot going - the root is already weak and it can get so weak that it lacks the energy to feed the graft. One nurse limb can solve that problem. What you have to be careful with is too much nurse growth which will dominate and wipe out the scion. I will pinch back the nurse growth if it gets too long. Leave any mature sized leaves, they will feed the graft. Also don't leave any nurse growth on persimmons or nuts, they will kill off the graft.

Rootstocks planted the previous year have enough vigor that there is no need for a nurse shoot. All my apple grafts these days are top workings and I leave no nurse shoots on them.

Scott

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 11:51AM
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marc5(6aOH)

Bruce,
Because G30 wood is brittle, it makes for very difficult grafting. Even the pros have problems with it. The solution is to summer (greenwood) bud. You will have no problems if you bud in August. I'm far from experienced and I've had great success with chip and T buds. Your buds will callus before the tree goes dormant. Then just before bud break in the spring, prune just above the bud. Leave enough of a stub to use as a stake. It's a piece of cake.

Marc

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 11:15PM
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bruce2288

Thanks for the comments guys.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2012 at 11:40AM
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marc5(6aOH)

Scott,

Thanks for your observations on the nurse leaves--interesting.

What's your experience with grafting potted trees and then planting them in the same season? I have a lot of potted pawpaws to graft and eventually plant out, and while I'd like to get them out of the pots ASAP, I've been told that I shouldn't graft and plant in the same year. Your thoughts?

Of course, the alternative is to plant out now and graft next year.....but I have the scionwood now.

Thanks,
Marc

    Bookmark   June 3, 2012 at 10:41PM
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Scott F Smith(6B/7A MD)

Marc, I don't do anything with potted plants other than starting seedlings in the spring and purchasing the occasional potted plant. On my purchases I have found I can plant a potted plant about any time and it does well, so I don't see why a graft in a pot could not be planted after it got going well. Maybe potted pawpaws are more of a problem, they transplant less well than other plants.

Scott

    Bookmark   June 3, 2012 at 11:38PM
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twm2340(7a)

Whip grafted 10 G30 this spring. Like scott said, leave a nurse branch. I left one near the base of each rootstock. The grafts have almost growth as the nurse branch, about 6". In two weeks they will be removed as there should be 8" or so on the grafts, and that should be enough to feed the rootstock. I am using a bamboo stake as a splint to hold the graft to the rootstock for the first year, as the union is said to be weak on some apples. After that, 2 T post.

Tyrone

    Bookmark   June 4, 2012 at 9:24AM
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marc5(6aOH)

Tyrone, with so much success with G30, you are one good grafter! Nice work. Good hands and a very sharp nice, I imagine. Thanks for tips on using the nurse branches, too. The next time I am tempted to graft G30 instead of budding, I will try it.

Marc

    Bookmark   June 5, 2012 at 9:18AM
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twm2340(7a)

Rootstock was from cummins, big and healthy. I grew them for two months then grafted. Used a box cutter, and changed the blade every 4 grafts. Two grafts for each half of the blade. Alot of pratice and failures before I got to be halfway decent at this.

    Bookmark   June 5, 2012 at 10:48AM
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marc5(6aOH)

Tyrone, I use a box cutter for my easy grafts: buds and small clefts. I still struggle with flat cuts for whip and tongue. I just purchased a utility cutter from Sears--recommended by some very experienced grafters--that is sort of an anvil pruner. It's meant to cut through leather, hose, thin metal--but it makes a great cut for whip and tongue grafts. I've been practicing with it, but no real grafts yet. I really like it--super clean cuts. For those of us without good knife skills, it might be the ticket.

Marc

    Bookmark   June 5, 2012 at 10:43PM
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marknmt

Marc, is that the "Accu-cut" for ~$30 or perhaps the "Handi-cut" for ~$14?

Thanks,

Mark

    Bookmark   June 6, 2012 at 8:27AM
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twm2340(7a)

If you are having trouble with making a long flat surface, try this scraper from Uline. I have not used it to make grafts, but to shave wood and a few other things. Easy to make a 3" sloping cut. Easy to change blades. Pratice making cuts over the summer. You can buy all the gadgets and gizmos you want, but there is no substitute for hands on pratice. Good luck.

Tyrone

Here is a link that might be useful: scraper.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2012 at 9:17AM
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john222-gg(Mississippi 8a/8b)

I see a lot of info on grafting.I Have never grafted before.This year I lost a apricot tree due to bad drainage.I fixed drainage sprouts came up from root stock.4shoots are growing well.Can I graft on the shoots? I have plums,peaches,nectarines,plum cot will Any work and when should I try.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2012 at 11:26AM
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marc5(6aOH)

Mark,

I bought the Handi-Cut from Sears--$14.99. I've only practiced with it--no "real" grafts yet. But it makes a great cut and a beautiful base for a whip and tongue. I'll be giving it a good workout this weekend--warm weather here in the 80s, which makes for perfect conditions for pawpaw grafting. Tyrone,

I have not thought to use a scaper for grafting, but I have read that a simple wood plane can make a very fine flat surface for whip and tongue. I may try one. You are right--practice, practice, practice.

Marc

Marc

    Bookmark   June 7, 2012 at 11:38PM
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