Nanking and Evans cherry grafting question

canadianplantJune 6, 2012

Im wondering what types of cherries have been successfuly grafted to either Evans cherry, or Nanking cherry?

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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

I grafted sweet to Evans, Nanking is compatible to plum,..so you can graft plums.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2012 at 7:26PM
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canadianplant

Oh nice! Did you notice if the sweet ended up being more resistant to the cold?

As for the nanking, is that japanese and/or european types?

    Bookmark   June 6, 2012 at 8:28PM
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marknmt

FWIW, I have an Italian prune plum I grafted to tomentosa about five years ago and it is doing well so far; hasn't fruited yet, but that doesn't surprise me. Considerably dwarfed, it is only now about chin-high. The plant seems happy and healthy and is attractive, I think.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2012 at 9:51PM
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canadianplant

marknmt - Thats what I was lookin for. I have access to some Nanking cuttings/fruit, as well as various Prunus scion. Was just wondering anyone elses experience experimenting with said root stock before I start doing so myself :D

    Bookmark   June 7, 2012 at 2:46PM
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marknmt

Mind, I have only the one sample and it's only a few years old, so there's always the possibility of delayed rejection on these kinds of things. But right now I'm encouraged.

I should have pointed out that a sucker from the same clone of prune plum was allowed to grow in the garden the same year that I grafted the prune, and it bloomed and set fruit for the first time this year. I'm hopeful that we'll see a bloom in the grafted prune next year. It's consistent with this particular clone to take its time bearing.

One curious thing to point out: the rootstock is a gnarly, rough looking thing (as is the case with tomentosa) so the smooth, graceful plum stem above it seems anomalous. Tomentosa takes its time getting any size, and I think that's what's holding the prune down.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2012 at 7:11PM
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marknmt

Mind, I have only the one sample and it's only a few years old, so there's always the possibility of delayed rejection on these kinds of things. But right now I'm encouraged.

I should have pointed out that a sucker from the same clone of prune plum was allowed to grow in the garden the same year that I grafted the prune, and it bloomed and set fruit for the first time this year. I'm hopeful that we'll see a bloom in the grafted prune next year. It's consistent with this particular clone to take its time bearing.

One curious thing to point out: the rootstock is a gnarly, rough looking thing (as is the case with tomentosa) so the smooth, graceful plum stem above it seems anomalous. Tomentosa takes its time getting any size, and I think that's what's holding the prune down.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2012 at 8:48PM
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canadianplant

Too true about delayed rejection. After what, 5 or so years you can be fairly confident right?

I dont know a lot about grafting, but isnt it odd that tomentosa as a rootstock would delay fruiting? Doesnt Tomentosa produce sometimes the year of planting, or 2 years from seed?

    Bookmark   June 8, 2012 at 10:32AM
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marknmt

Didn't mean to suggest that the tomentosa had delayed fruiting; I meant to make clear that this clone in general is rather slow to fruit. I'd thought along the same lines as you: if anything, it should speed fruiting up. So it seemed worth mentioning that there was no precocity to my inexperienced eye.

As for delayed rejection I'd think five years is a pretty fair test, but I really don't know.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2012 at 7:57PM
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canadianplant

Naw I got ya! I just found it odd, that a rootstock that is known to fruit very early, wouldnt have an effect on the scion (so far i guess).

    Bookmark   June 9, 2012 at 6:27AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Yes, not much changes it terms of fruiting or hardiness, it might be that they would be slightly hardier, ...couldn't test this because I have nothing to compare it to.

I only have Evans cherries grafted to pin cherries and have less freeze back, this could make it more hardy but other factors play a roll here,..I'm thinking of a different growing habit, not as vigorous, ..thus hardening off better in the fall.

    Bookmark   June 9, 2012 at 11:49AM
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canadianplant

Thats an interesting idea. Im assuming you grafted the evans just as an experiment? THere is no real reason to want to graft evans to anything?

    Bookmark   June 9, 2012 at 3:16PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Initially yes, but it turned out good, when some years the Evans on their own roots have hardly any cherries I still get from the others.

    Bookmark   June 9, 2012 at 9:25PM
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canadianplant

Great when an experiment does that :D

Thanks again...

    Bookmark   June 10, 2012 at 3:47PM
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