What tree fruits plan for next year,more of the same? Really?

persimmonbob(6b)August 11, 2012

I am done with asian persimmon,done with paw paw's,done with plums, done with pears,done with fig's.I just grow with what i have now.I have some room for my new endeavor,Pommagrenate's.I have 3 bushes that are 4 years old and survived 2 strong winters and last year mild one.I grew these from store bought ones.They seams to be drought resistance and are low maintenance.I am on the look-out for a couple excellent kinds for my area.I appreciate any input.

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trianglejohn

Since my "orchard" is only two years old I will wait til next year to decide if anyone gets booted to the compost pile and replaced with something that performs better. I only have a few holes left to fill and none of them are anything extra special. I did buy an 'Angel Red' pomegranite last year and it is doing fine but has not bloomed or fruited.

Big performers for me this year were goumis, bush cherries, elderberries, blackberries, blueberries and table grapes and for the first time in my life I've grown a watermelon that had more flavor than store bought. Peaches, pears and apples will be hitting their stride next year.

    Bookmark   August 11, 2012 at 8:22PM
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bamboo_rabbit(9A Inverness FL)

Persimmonbob,

You could try Green Sea Farms as they carry 50+ varieties of poms including some very hardy ones.

    Bookmark   August 12, 2012 at 8:49AM
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Scott F Smith(6B/7A MD)

Bob, congratulations on knowing how to say done. It took me 750 varieties.

I don't know where you are located but apricots would be my #1 addition if I had what you list. They are easier than plums, less problems with rot curculio and shot-hole, more drought-tolerant, and they come in really early. Get a Tomcot, its early and the most reliable and tasty.

For poms I haven't heard enough reports of long-term success (in terms of a reliable good-sized harvest) from folks growing hardy poms in the east, so overall they are a bit more iffy. Make sure the variety doesn't ripen too late, when I looked into it I estimated about half of all pom varieties are too late for me. I have had a few fruits from my poms but not enough to see how well they could work. Splitting is an unknown issue, they do seem more prone in our climate. Late frosts are another concern; half of my Angel Red died this spring in a late frost; none of the other poms was affected at all. Rolling River is another good source of varieties, but you need to check into the variety before getting it since they are a west coast nursery. The two standards for the east still seem to be Salatsvaki and Kazake, they are both known to be reliably hardy and early enough harvest. My Kazake should give me a couple fruits this year.

Scott

    Bookmark   August 12, 2012 at 10:44AM
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persimmonbob(6b)

Thanks guys for your input on pom's.I wish i started earlier with them.

    Bookmark   August 13, 2012 at 8:55PM
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