milk as a Ca?

TheMasterGardener1(5B)May 31, 2011

Hello. I was researching milk/water as a source of Ca. Floiage and roots. I was just interested to here if anyone has done this. Thanks.

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jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

Not useful nor helpful.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2011 at 2:09AM
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2ajsmama

What about whey? If you have a dairy (cow or goat) nearby that makes cheese, they probably have lots of whey.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2011 at 8:23AM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

"Not useful nor helpful."

O thanks. This is so helpful. Full of info. wow.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2011 at 2:33PM
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gardengal48

If you had done the research, you would have found a) most soils contain adequate levels of calcium; b) even calcium deficient soils have little impact on crop production......it is a micronutrient and required in very small amounts; and c) milk is a pretty inefficient way of delivering calcium. There are other, much better sources including ground limestone, spinach, turnip and other greens, fish meal, bone meal, and kelp meal or emulsion.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2011 at 9:46PM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

If you had done the research, you would have found a) most soils contain adequate levels of calcium; b)

This specific garden is soiless and is using MG tomatoe feed lacking Ca. I know the sources of Ca and yes lime was used but that ca and mg is used up and for experamtle purposes I want to know about the milk. Gypsum would be the best bet or a Ca Mg liquid but this garden is not mine ;)

    Bookmark   June 1, 2011 at 1:02AM
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pnbrown

Actually, Ca tends to be low east of the limestone line. An exception is florida sand. It is easily brought up with powdered limestone, at least for some time. It leaches in light soils.

    Bookmark   June 1, 2011 at 7:20AM
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gargwarb

If you want to experiment, go for it. However, milk is not a good source of plant available calcium.
Depending on how much lime you used, that in itself may very well provide sufficient calcium for plant nutrition through the growing season.

    Bookmark   June 1, 2011 at 8:24AM
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gardengal48

This specific garden is soiless

So this is a container gardening situation? If so, there are numerous different supplements that includea range of trace elements that would supply any necessary Ca. Milk just doesn't deliver enough to be a significant source.

    Bookmark   June 1, 2011 at 10:40AM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

thanks alot for the info. I figured it was a bad idea. Anytime somone new to gardening suggests somthing I will make sure not to consider it again. ;)

    Bookmark   June 1, 2011 at 1:05PM
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