vegetables that like their stems buried

kjggames(z9/10, sunset16)October 7, 2008

Hey there all you happy people,

I am trying to come up with a list of vegetables that like to have their stems buried, like tomatoes and potatoes. The plan is to build up my soil over a long period of time, while at the same time doing a modified french intensive style garden. So, while the plants are growing, I plan to add more soil, and plants, and soil, and plants, and so on. This way, I build up my soil, while at the same time making a productive plot.

I plan on starting with potatoes in the cooler season, and as they grow, bury the stems, which encourages tuber development. Then as the season gets warmer, add tomatoes, as they grow, bury their stems, which encourages root development for the tomatoes, while encouraging more tuber growth for the potatoes, etc.

So, I am looking for other vegetables that can be grown in this environment. Celery comes to mind.

Any other suggestions?

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nandina(8b)

Anything in the squash/pumpkin/cucumber/melon/watermelon families. Just peg stems on surface, cover with soil leaving the growing tip ends exposed. Strawberries.

    Bookmark   October 8, 2008 at 8:24AM
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Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

Any member of the nightshade family, Tomatoes, Peppers, and potatoes, any member of the cucurbit family, the melons, Cucumbers, Squash, pumpkins, are what come to mind right off.

    Bookmark   October 9, 2008 at 6:53AM
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fruitgirl

I respectfully disagree with the "strawberries" suggestion above. If you bury the crowns too deeply, the plants won't grow, and will kind of just rot at the crown level. So it wouldn't be good to plant them in a bed where you intend to keep adding material.

    Bookmark   October 9, 2008 at 11:20AM
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slacker

I might be doing it wrong , but I have never burried my pumpkin plants either

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 8:26AM
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kjggames(z9/10, sunset16)

Thanks for your help folks,

Once I know exactly how I plan on using this info, I'll post my results to let you all know.

Keep the suggestions coming, though!

Ken

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 3:54PM
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nandina(8b)

Ken, when I posted the above I assumed that you knew to cover the strawberry runners with soil, not the crowns. Also, I believe you understand that it is safe to bury the many growing stems of pumpkins, squash, etc. A technique used when the plants have been injured by squash borers which allows new roots to form along the damaged branches. Also a common practice used by some trying to grow giant pumpkins for competition. In this case, all the blossoms/young fruit except one are removed from the plant, the stems are kept covered with rich soil (the formulas for which are closely kept, guarded secrets by the competitors) and the remaining pumpkin receives extra nutrition allowing it to gain extraordinary weight.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 4:31PM
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