Hoop House Ventilation

shagmensApril 12, 2009

I plan on building a hoophouse up here in southern Ontario and would like to garner ideas for ventilating my cold frame while I am absent and at work full time during the day. Unfortunately I can not be around to manually lift the coverings on my hoophouse for ventilation purposes.

Is there a cost effective (cheap) automatic alternative that will ventilate my hoophouse according to hot temperature extremes? My hoophouse I plan on using pvc 1 inch piping all around covered with greenhouse poly plastic covering.

Thanks,

cav

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stephaniesgarden(8)

I just built a 12x16 hoop-style....It was about $150 not counting the visqueen.

I live in florida and even though it's early spring, I'm facing a slight heat problem already.

My husband built the door using 2x2s and then covered it with metal screen. It's really really nice. We had a late freeze 3 nights ago that I just ran out and stapled a piece of visqueen over the door....now it's pulled off and folded up for emergencies..... :)

Meanwhile, my husband is fixing to build a 'window' in the back that will also be a screened window. And when winter comes I will put visqueen over it. Of coarse a few drops of rain can still get in but....for my flooring i used a roll of black weed fabric. It DRAINS, is easy to sweep out and keeps the weeds away.! I LOVE IT!

    Bookmark   April 18, 2009 at 5:12PM
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barrie2m_

Thermostatically controlled intake louvers and exhaust fans will open and ventilate your hoophouse in your absense but the extent of ventilation will depend on the size units you install. Naturally you want a cheap alternative so my best advise is to attend a few ag auctions in your area and possibly pick some used units cheaply.

Your greenhouse poly plastic is likely your most expensive outlay to date and it will only last you one season before the PVC deteriorates it at touch points. That should be the first issue that you address to save money.

    Bookmark   April 20, 2009 at 9:32PM
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hex2006

As you`re building it yourself you could make a large cantilever roof vent and use a standard auto opener to operate it.
Another option is to use inflated poly tubing for full length side vents (aka poly-vent),the fan could be controlled by a basic thermostat.
Large roof and side vents would perform at least as well as a big exhaust fan and draw a lot less power.

    Bookmark   April 21, 2009 at 11:06PM
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sfallen2002(z5 IA)

DIY hoophouse = ventilation easy, inexpensive = doors.

My HH had a door built into each end (2x4). The end that was away from prevailing winds had another, smaller "window" vent in it that was operated by a univent - I think there is a weight limit on what they can handle. Mine swung horizontally, so there was little weight involved.

When temps were high enough, I propped one door open about 1 brick width (maybe 3-4 inches). When it got warmer, door was propped open wider, eventually back door propped open too.

Wildlife will find your HH a Shangri-la, so if there are critters about, invest in a little chicken wire - I left mine in a small roll and wedged it into the open doorway after losing some (prized) cabbage..

Lots of plans floating about for these kind of doors - one of 'em is an extension site.

    Bookmark   May 4, 2009 at 10:55PM
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