What Variety is a True Violet Color, and can I grow it outside?

Suzi AKA DesertDance Zone 9bJuly 29, 2014

I am new to this forum. I would love to grow a few violets with that really violet color. Why? Because I wish to candy them for garnish, and infuse liqueur with the non-candied ones along with some purple figs... Yummmmmm!

I have horror stories with fungus gnats invading house plants, so I hesitate.

I do keep fresh produce like fruit/tomatoes on a plate in the kitchen, and also have a little compost bowl. The gnats find a way.

I lost a forest of baby figs grown from cuttings due to those gnats, so here are the questions:

1. I have a pot shelf on a north facing wall. It is always in the shade, even in late afternoon due to the roof overhang. Would that be a good spot to grow a few plants?

2. What variety is just true simple purple? Not looking for double fancy here. Just a plain little violet.

3. Where do I buy it?

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quimoi

I believe you are not looking for Saintpaulias (african violets) but for the sweet violet, a member of the pansy family.

Here's a link I found when I was checking. I love those violets too but they froze out here.

http://www.garden.org/ediblelandscaping/?page=edible-month-violets

I think there are other forums that could help you.

Let us know if you really wanted to candy African violets.

Here you go. There is a forum here for violets (the viola kind that is what people candy and eat).

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/violet/

Diana

This post was edited by quimoi on Tue, Jul 29, 14 at 12:57

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 12:16PM
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fortyseven_gw

First, you need to find out if they are safe for human consumption. Chemically, they are mostly sugar and water. Next, send for a packet of seeds from Parks or Nadeau and raise your own organically. One packet will
hundreds for just a few dollars.

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 12:21PM
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Suzi AKA DesertDance Zone 9b

Thanks for the answers. I am clueless on violets. Ask me about wine grapes, I got all the answers!! But I didn't even know Africans were not the same as sweet violets.

I shall purchase some seeds, and do my thing. Thanks so much for your help!

Suzi

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 6:04PM
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fortyseven_gw

Hi Suzi The seeds I mentioned are for African Violets, not the wild sugar violets you grow outdoors in the garden, like a crop. So, I don't think the Park's or Nadeau seeds are what you are looking for. Hopefully, you will be able to find some wild violet seeds to sew outdoors or in a window garden.
Joanne

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 10:51PM
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lucky123

Suzi
You are in Southern California. I doubt violas or violets will grow outside, maybe in the winter.
I plant viola seeds or started plants in September.
I put the seeds or plants in a plastic coffee can with holes punched in the bottom for drainage.
I put that in a pretty cache pot
I place the seedlings or started plants in front of a Very Sunny window on a table in the living room.
I always have bowl full of viola blossoms cascading down by Christmas
I enjoy them all winter long until about April when it starts getting too warm. When the plants get scruffy looking in the late spring, I toss them. Start over the next September

    Bookmark   July 30, 2014 at 8:29PM
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Suzi AKA DesertDance Zone 9b

I plan to grow them in winter. Bought some Viola Odorata Queen Charolotte seeds on Ebay... 70 seeds. I'll start em in Oct. We have pine groves, and a lot of trees, so I'll put them in partial shade on drip systems, and try a few in pots.

I want to try these sweet edibles.

Should be fun. A little experiment!

Suzi

    Bookmark   July 30, 2014 at 9:49PM
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paul_(z5 MI)

Fungus gnats are only an issue in very moist organic soils. Moderating your watering practices or adjusting your media may help.

All in all, fungus gnats are quite easy to control.
STEP 1: Go to your local BBS and by a package of mosquito dunks (they look like little donuts).
STEP 2: Break off a 1/4 of a donut and put it in a plastic gallon milk jug.
STEP 3: Fill jug with water and let sit for a couple days.
STEP 4: Shake/agitate the water in the jug a bit and then water your plants with the dunk water. (Leave the dunk chunk in the jug.)
STEP 5: Refill jug and repeat the next time you water.

Eventually the chunk will completely disintegrate, at which point you put a new piece in. NOTE: This is not an instant fix. It will take a week or two.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2014 at 2:34PM
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lauraeli_

Wow paul great info! I was not familiar with that product. It has great reviews for mosquito usage, and is very affordable. Good stuff! (y)

    Bookmark   August 2, 2014 at 5:07PM
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