Can you ID my mystery philos? (6 pics)

bihai(zone 9)February 1, 2006

Here they are. There are six of them. All are vining philodendrons. #1 is lemon yellow, never green at any stage. #2 I have had about 3 years. It has vined up the greenhouse wall to 12 feet. Its stem is as thick around as a hotdog. #3 was growing up a tree down in the Keys and I got a cutting of it #4 has a slight white variegation, very vague, on one leaf #5 I believe might be "Red Cardinal" #6 is small and heartshaped.

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GrowHappy(z7 MD)

Bihai,

No positives, but i'll take a stab! The second one looks similar to Mammei(sp?). The 4th photo looks as if it could have squamiferum(sp?) in it's lineage. The 5th photo could be Bloody Mary or Red Cardinal The last one is just 'Lemon Philo', or at least, that's what mine was sold as! I love Philos and know that it can be hard to get them ID'd. I'm anxious to see what others have to say!

GH

    Bookmark   February 1, 2006 at 7:20PM
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bihai(zone 9)

I agree that that one looks like Mamei, but what I have read of Mamei is that it doesn;t really climb, it runs along the ground. This one is a fairly aggressive climber. I think I am going to take a cutting off of it in March and see if I cen root another piece for the back wall, if and when I get rod of my heliconias that seemingly no one anywhere wants to trade me for.

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 2:16PM
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susanlynne48(OKC7a)

Are you sure that third one is a philo, Bihai?

Susan

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 4:42PM
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bihai(zone 9)

No, I am not actually. I don't know what it is. It vines like a philo or an anthurium but I don't think its an anthurium. It could be something else. The lady who gave me the cutting thought it was a philo, but she had no idea which one. She got it from her mother in law, who thought it was a philo as well. It was growing all the way up this tree, her specimen was absolutely HUGE. It rooted really easily and now its a nice plant. I am hoping someone, somewhere, will know what it might be.

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 6:16PM
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raymikematt(z7b SC)

Not sure on the first one. Ive seen it around as Lemon Philo or whatever like GH says. There are several varieties with all yellow leaves though. Im tempted to say its a young P. painted lady though. The second one is hard to tell, looks like it is a tough one to get a good photo of though. I dont think its P. mamei though. The third one is a Syngonium, probably S. podophyllum. Number four looks like Philodendron bippenifolium. The fifth one is another one that is hard to tell but possibly P.domesticum. The last one looks like P. scandens. Hope that helps a little.
Michael M.

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 6:33PM
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bihai(zone 9)

Uh oh, I just Googled Syngonium podophyllum...."Arrowhead Vine"...its considered a noxious weed here in FL. I guess I better not let it get out!

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 7:22PM
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raymikematt(z7b SC)

Bihia, you can see it growing on trees from Central to South Florida. Alot of time it blends in with the other climbers/shrubs and is not very noticeable, until it starts to take over. Definately a weed all the way up to Gainesville.

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 9:04PM
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bihai(zone 9)

I guess that explains why hers was so voracious in the Keys. It probably gets frozen back here, I have never seen it in Gainesville area before. We do have the smaller types, the little Nephritis like plants...those will freeze back in a very hard freeze but come right back out in March and practically take over until the next hard freeze. Sometimes I have to cut them off my house. They are worse than Bolivian Wandering Jew.

    Bookmark   February 2, 2006 at 10:02PM
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susanlynne48(OKC7a)

Looks, however, like you have it confined. As long as it's confined, won't it do all right? I wouldn't, however, let it run loose anywhere. That's what I thought, but I wasn't going to take any chances until someone else piped in. I know they are invasive. They are pretty, though. The foliage reminds me of arisaemas.

Susan

    Bookmark   February 3, 2006 at 10:50AM
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bihai(zone 9)

Philodendrons, syngoniums etc are pretty much new ground to me. I have only really ever grown anthuriums and different "elephant ears". Everyone here in Florida has an obligatory "pothos" vine or 2 going up a tree, and a Monstera and Philo selloum. I don't grow calla lilies. I have a few Amorphophallus types, and a few aquatic aroids like Lasia and Cyrtospermia (sp?) but the rest of the aroid world is new ground. I haven't started collecting them yet. I probably SHOULDN't start as it will become an obsession, just like every other plant group eventually turns out to be.

    Bookmark   February 3, 2006 at 1:07PM
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russ_fla(9)

The 1st picture is P. 'Golden Erubescens'. #2, MikeM, check the bright pinholes next to the main veins on several leaves. Don't you think that's probably an Epipremnum? I think it's an underleaf shot of a plain green E. aureum (aureus?)'Pothos'. #3 is definitely Syngonium podophyllum in mature stage leaves. On #4, note the pinched center lobe on 3 of 4 leaves, and odd folds in parts of other leaves. This disfigurement is typical of a small hybrid of bipenn, I believe it's called 'Minibelle'. It usually has some indistinct streaky variegation, but some of mine have lost it. That'd be my guess. Could be a regular bipennifolium tho that's got some kind of problem. #5--I think is good old 'Red Emerald'. #6 is P. scandens.
Russ

    Bookmark   February 3, 2006 at 8:04PM
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bihai(zone 9)

THANK YOU!!!!!!
The one you say is green pothos is quite large. Those leaves are about 10-12 inches long, 8 inches wide. It has climbed up over my head, which is why the photo was taken from below. It lost all the leaves on the lower stem one by one as it climbed up the wall. Are Red Emerald and Red Cardinal the same plant?

    Bookmark   February 3, 2006 at 10:21PM
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raymikematt(z7b SC)

I think you are right Russ. Im not seeing the pinholes but I do see that fibrous stuff (good choice of words..lol) that you see on lots of the larger Epipremnums.

Bihia, I think Ive read Syngonium podophyllum was found in the wild (introduced of course) as far north as Gainesville. I know of people as far north as Brunswick Georgia growing it outside year round (with occasional die-back with hard freezes). I dont think it will be much of a threat in your area though.

    Bookmark   February 3, 2006 at 10:30PM
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russ_fla(9)

Bihai, I've never heard of a P. Red Cardinal, only Black
Cardinal. In any case, I've never heard Red Emerald called that. Red Emerald is a very old cross with the species
P. erubescens as one parent, I forget the other parent. Even tho Red Emerald is one of the more common hybrid vining Philos today, it's nowhere near as widely grown as it used to be decades ago when it was in every dept store, nursery and florist. Same thing with Red Duchess, Red Princess, Emerald Duke, Emerald King, Emerald Queen and other old vining hybrids, only these are quite rare these days. Red Duchess can still be found as florist plants.

Bihai, if you hold that #2 up to the light, can you in fact
see some pinholes along midribs? You know what regular green Pothos looks like I'm sure, does it look like that to
you?
Russ

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 1:46AM
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bihai(zone 9)

Russ,
thank you for the info. Actually, I do NOT know what regular green pothos looks like!! I know that may sound strange, but almost all the plants here in Florida called Pothos and the variegated types. They are probably the #1 planted vining plant for growing up trees in every part of the state. I am doing a greenhouse workday today, I will get my ladder and inspect the plant closely for the pinholes you are talking about.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 7:30AM
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susanlynne48(OKC7a)

There you go, Bihai - you got the answers you needed on this forum! Cool, huh?

You really should try some arisaemas, though! I think you'd really love the jacks.

Susan

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 7:19PM
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bihai(zone 9)

I have wanted to try some for a long time, but NO ONE around here grows them, (which makes me think there's a reason for that) and no one around here sells them either.

I've looked at the ones in Plant Delights hundreds of times and can't bring myself to spend that sort of moolah on something that I have no idea if it will do well here!

Does anyone else in Florida grow them, and if so, how do they do here?????

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 7:36PM
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keiko2(D/FW7b)

Bihai, If no one in Fl answers with more specifics you might want to try Arisaema tortuosum as a trial. These can often be bought very inexpensively and do well in Dallas where spring can be very hot. Others that follow a similar pattern are griffithii, japonicum, and candidissimum. Nepenthoides does fairly well here but may suddenly go dormant during a spring heat wave. Triphyllum is probably the least likely to succeed that far south, they have good and bad years here. I find Arisaemas infinitely more fascinating than Philos :-)

Keiko

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 9:19PM
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raymikematt(z7b SC)

Actually Arisaema triphyllum is one of Floridas only native Aroid species.
Michael M.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 10:26PM
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russ_fla(9)

Bihai, the green Pothos is exactly like the variegated form,
only it's color is different. In fact, varieg forms sometimes revert to an all green plant, and yours very likely is a reversion. The green form is faster and stronger growing since all of it's leaf surface can produce food. I don't see a lot of pinholes on the leaves in your photo, but there do seem to be a few along the midribs, highlighted by the sun in your underleaf shot. If present,
these would at least identify it as an Epipremnum.

I find it hard to keep from yawning in the presence of most
tuberous Aroids, and Arisaemas downright put me to sleep.
Many amorphophallus species are interesting in the colors and patterns of their petioles and leaves. I'm never over-impressed by their blooms, to me it's strictly a foliage
plant. This genus has taken the Int'l Aroid Society growers
by storm over the last many years. I think they're an interesting addition to an Aroid collection of other non-tuberous genera, but that's all. Vining Philos and Monsteras are the most fascinating of the Aroids in my opinion, for their uncanny search for height, and scandent immature and mature climbing leaf stages which can be explosively dramatic, especially in Monsteras.
Russ

    Bookmark   February 7, 2006 at 11:26PM
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kelly_indiana(z5 IL)

hi growhappy!

Those photos are GORGEOUS - i have to ask what sort of digital camera do you have? i need to get a new one and yours takes such awesome photos.

thanks!
kelly

    Bookmark   January 21, 2007 at 8:46PM
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bihai(zone 9)

Hi Kelly,
the photos are mine, not Growhappys. I have an old Nikon camera. Its about a 2000 model. Glad you like the pics!

    Bookmark   January 22, 2007 at 8:03AM
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