Success!

JoshTx(8a)November 21, 2013

After work tonight I went out on the back porch to water the cuttings (for the first time since sticking them) I took from Ogrose's garden. She let me snip on Lamarque, Mons Tillier, Maggie, and G. Nabonnand, and up until this point I had been disturbing a single Mons Tillier as a means to gauge how the cuttings were doing. As I was pulling a cup with Lamarque in it out of the box I thought to myself, "Wow, this one looks nice and healthy." I looked underneath and what I found led to a whole cascade of discoveries tonight as I checked cups.

By the time it was all said and done I snapped pics of these cups.

All of the cuttings have calluses to some degree, but these were the standouts. All cuttings were taken October 10th.

I feel like I want to root everything now!

Josh

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bluegirl_gw

DAY--um!!! Six weeks? SIX WEEKS!!! For roots like that?

I just went from feeling generously supportive to jealously resentful.

So, do you do custom rooting for the less skillful? I expect an e-mail with DETAILED instructions.

Those are some fine roots--congratulations! Glad you didn't jerk them out of the cups to photograph, haha.

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 3:21AM
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JoshTx(8a)

Bluegirl,

I had about the same reaction as you! I don't know when it happened but it looks like a handful of the roses decided to just go for it. 'G. Nabonnand' is definitely taking its sweet time, though.

If you've got something you'd like me to try to root I'd be happy to do so! The more practice the better! I honestly believe that the overall success is due mainly to the kinds of roses I tried to propagate. These roses are notoriously vigorous here as well as Texas lovers so I haven't really tried my hand at rooting difficult varieties.

I am glad I had enough sense in my head to photograph the cup too. I will admit though that my first, fleeting instinct was to dump the cutting out for a quick modeling session haha. Luckily, logic took over and I went for the gentler approach.

Josh

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 4:14AM
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alana8asc

Great Job!! I'm trying to root again as well. So far I've had nothing but failures, but this year three of the five cuttings have new sets of leaves...so I feel better about these! Happy for you and jealous at the same time! Might need your help as well with beautiful roots like that! :)

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 10:23AM
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desertgarden561- Las Vegas Z9a

Josh,

I am impressed! What method are you using ?

Lynn

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 12:08PM
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seil zone 6b MI

They look wonderfully healthy and happy! Keep up the good work!

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 12:44PM
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JoshTx(8a)

Thanks everyone!

Lynn,

I am using the baggie method. You can sort of see how I put a baggie over the top of the cup.

Josh

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 1:46PM
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JoshTx(8a)

Alana,

If you'll go to my 'My Page' you can send me an email. I'd be happy to give you detailed instructions about how I went about processing the cuttings for rooting. I can't guarantee it will work, but I'm happy to talk you through it.

Josh

    Bookmark   November 22, 2013 at 1:27AM
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JoshTx(8a)

Double post.

This post was edited by JoshTx on Fri, Nov 22, 13 at 3:04

    Bookmark   November 22, 2013 at 3:03AM
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roseseek

Congratulations, Josh! You will find, no matter what the method, some roses are going to root pretty much no matter what. Others are going to continually thumb their noses at you. The speed and success rates are going to vary greatly depending upon time of year, too. Generally, those which are sure-fire rooters will be the faster to root and the faster to mature. Kim

    Bookmark   November 22, 2013 at 3:11AM
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JoshTx(8a)

Mr. Rupert,

Thanks! I'm excited it actually worked.

I was just saying that exact thing to someone from the boards. The success of the cuttings would most probably be attributed to the cultivars I am trying to propagate. None of them are particularly finicky roses, so I cannot take all the credit for the rooting.

Josh

    Bookmark   November 22, 2013 at 8:05AM
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new_garden(7)

What part of the plant did you use? New wood, old wood, freshly bloomed stems, or... ??

    Bookmark   June 22, 2014 at 7:39PM
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alana8asc

I never did send that email Josh, getting better here..practice makes perfect! BTW what kind of potting soil did you use?

    Bookmark   June 22, 2014 at 9:57PM
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PortlandMysteryRose(8)

Woo hoo, Josh!! Yes, rooting can be addictive...in a good way. You are evidently providing cuttings with that perfect combo of science and magic touch. Your talents are a gift! I think your grandmother is smiling. I know mine is. :-) Carol

    Bookmark   June 23, 2014 at 4:03PM
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mauvegirl8(Texas)

Starbucks plastic cups are perfect for rooting.
Save your cup & upcycle into a rose.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2014 at 5:13PM
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ingrid_vc(Z10 SoCal)

The only thing I've ever rooted is Mutabilis where I stuck a few canes in the ground near the mother plant, and no doubt by inherent toughness they actually "took" and grew into roses. Oh, actually another one was Portland of Glendora and I'm sure they survived for the same reason. However, when I see a really fast-growing and beautiful rose like Mme. de Sombreuil it makes me want to make a few more to decorate my desolate garden. Roses that actually thrive in this kind of environment should be cherished and multiplied. It's the only rose that right now is putting out lots of new shoots from its canes in spite of its hot location. I'm afraid if I buy another one (this one was from Vintage) it won't be as vigorous. I'm glad you started this thread, Josh, which has "enabled" me to try rooting cuttings. Congratulations on yours, by the way. What a great job you've done. For someone who is watching their finances (which is probably most of us), quite a bit of money can be saved by this method. Not even to mention that feeling of satisfaction!

Ingrid

    Bookmark   June 23, 2014 at 6:41PM
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jerijen(Zone 10)

That's why I love clear plastic cups. We put more holes in than that, but ours are under mist, so there's a difference.

It's so darned much fun to see those roots!

    Bookmark   June 23, 2014 at 6:43PM
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adamharbeck(WA Aust)

I have tried and tried to grow rose cuttings. tried jars of water. tried rooting hormone, tried honey. But when i pruned a couple of roses the other month, I thought it would be a shame to just toss them so i just trimmed them up and shoved them in the ground 3/4 deep. And they all seem to be taking! I think there must me some microbes in the soil taht they need in order to take.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2014 at 9:05PM
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boncrow66

That's awesome Josh, I haven't tried to root roses yet but I would love to try it one day and hopefully have the same success as you! Hey since we are in the same zone in Texas I would love to hear what roses you grow and how well they do for you in your garden. I am new this year I OGR's and david Austin roses and would love to hear about roses you have had success with in our climate.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2014 at 9:26PM
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JoshTx(8a)

Thanks for all the support guys! Unfortunately our bitter winter did in almost all of these cuttings. The only two that survived were from the batch of cuttings I took from 'Maggie.' I'll be trying my hand again at it this year though!

Boncrow,

Send me an email and I can run you through the roses I have that are great here. You can find my email if you click on my 'My Page.'

Happy gardening everyone!

Josh

    Bookmark   June 30, 2014 at 10:22PM
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boncrow66

Josh for some reason I am unable to access the My Page and find your email. I will try agin later. Just a quick question until I can get to it, how does your Mary rose do for you? I am trying to decide between Mary or Sophys rose. Thanks!

    Bookmark   June 30, 2014 at 10:41PM
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Kippy(SoCal zone 10. Sunset Zone 24)

I have a box of cuttings on my patio right now.

I never know if they are teasing me with new growth after a month or if that is their way of giving up and dying.

But right now I am enjoying peaking in the box a couple of times a week to see what is going on.

It seems like Belinda's Dream wants to grow (of course that might be go) I few others too, but I think I will wait to say success for a few more months (I hate waiting)

    Bookmark   June 30, 2014 at 11:02PM
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JoshTx(8a)

Boncrow,
My Mary Rose is grafted on Huey, and does very well! It's one of two Austins I would ever grow again here in N. Texas. Relatively Blackspot free, and it have a very impressive spring bloom (only one out of all my roses). Ambridge Rose is my favorite Austin though. It loves the heat, keeps its leaves, and in the right weather it blooms these peachy pink, blush blooms that smell sophisticated and rich.

Kippy,

Oh yes, they like to keep us guessing. I was so bad about checking these cuttings for callusing (much to the ire of my friends here on the board), I would dump the little guys out of their cups to try and check for roots. It's an exciting thing and they just can't grow quick enough for us!

Josh

    Bookmark   July 3, 2014 at 12:57PM
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boncrow66

Thanks Josh! I will take a look at Ambridge.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2014 at 8:05PM
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Kippy(SoCal zone 10. Sunset Zone 24)

I just checked, again, a couple look a little worse, but then there are the newest additions to the box who have little white roots poking out their band pots: Belinda's Dream and Sally Holmes. They are kind of cheats I think because I had already heard they root like weeds.

Leonie Lamesch, 4 weeks old and also a root out of the bottom of the pot.

Madame Berard, looks like it will make it

Blush Noisette, all look pretty good

Russelliana, looking pretty good.

The rest I will just have to see how it goes.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2014 at 11:10PM
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roseseek

Congrats! See? It isn't all THAT hard, once you hit on the combination that works where you are, with what you want to propagate, when you want to propagate and with the involvement you want to have with it. You can kill more with over tending and over checking than by leaving them alone to do their things. Wait until you get to budding! Happy Fourth! Kim

    Bookmark   July 4, 2014 at 1:30AM
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new_garden(7)

I have several roses that just bloomed and I'd like to root, what part of the bush works best for rooting?

Here's one I want more of:

    Bookmark   July 4, 2014 at 8:40AM
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Kippy(SoCal zone 10. Sunset Zone 24)

I think I figured out part of what is helping this time.

Rather than keep the box at moms, I have it on my patio as close to the shady wall as possible. I have kept the top covered, other than a couple of foggy days I thought it was too shady and instead burnt them (that over tending issues)

BUT my patio has a 2 story stucco wall that reflects heat/light back and gets the concrete roasting hot in the sunny area. That heat radiates through the concrete to the shady wall and is like keeping a heating pad under the cutting box.

At the rate Belinda roots, I have to wonder why it is not a root stock...lol

    Bookmark   July 4, 2014 at 11:59AM
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roseseek

You'll find the more closely related to multiflora (which "hybrid musks" ARE) the faster and easier it roots. That's one of the issues which makes multiflora such an invasive, immortal pest. Indirect light, strongly filtered light both work exceptionally well. I had not been able to root anything here until the wrapping method, which works perfectly here most of the time, but is limited to late winter to early spring, using dormant material only.

A friend shared starts of Apostle Plant, the blue and white walking iris, which I potted and placed in the front planter in the walled area because it is the only place I can protect them and keep them sufficiently damp. Another friend has been supplying me with material from one of his seedlings I want to breed with, but nothing had worked propagating it. One month ago, I received a bundle of bud sticks from him. I budded all the seemingly suitable buds, then struck the remaining buds in the sticks from which I had removed buds, as cuttings and placed them in what seemed to me the perfect place. I nestled the pot up under the overhanging foliage of the Apostle Plants, behind the pots of budded stocks and rooted cuttings I've worked on for the past few months.



I kept the pot extremely well watered, perhaps a bit too over watered, but they didn't turn black nor dry out. This area receives strong, reflected light from just after sun up until a bit after 10:30 when the sun is directly overhead until a little after noon. Then it receives strong, reflected/indirect light for the rest of the day. Right now, 11:30, the sun is directly overhead and intense, but the overhanging foliage prevents them from being fried and provides strong humidity due to all the transpiration occurring from the surrounding plants. It is the closest to "green house conditions" I can create here without literally cooking the plant.

I tend to slice out buds on the lighter side to prevent removing pith with them. That appears to result in leaving some of the growth buds in the bud sticks. It appears very much like the images I posted showing what gets left in stocks if they aren't sufficiently dis budded prior to budding.
It appears from what I am seeing from the cuttings struck from the used bud sticks, there was enough of the growth bud remaining in them to not only root from the exposed cambium layer around the bud, but also grow from the remaining bud tissue. I removed many of the middle buds, leaving the smaller, less mature ones at the tops and bottoms of the sticks. The new growth seems to be coming from the "wounds" left from removing the buds in the middle of the sticks. This is what they look like one month (from 6-4 to 7-4) from being worked and struck.

It appears there should be a number of budded plants as well as a few own root, all from the same buds!

To answer the question of what material to use, ideally it is flowering stems from which perfect flowers have just fallen. By seeing what the bloom looked like before propagating it, you can be more sure what your new plant will look like when it flowers. Should that stem have mutated, sported, the resulting flower would have appeared different from what was expected, or the growth from that stem would have varied from the original, such as climbing instead of bush. If you propagate material from which you haven't seen blooms, should there have been a mutation you didn't see, you may propagate a plant which is quite a bit different from what you expect. That is often how degenerative mutations make their way into commerce. Bud wood or cuttings are harvested from the mother plants without seeing flowers and "surprise!" plants result from their use. Kim

    Bookmark   July 4, 2014 at 2:50PM
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Kippy(SoCal zone 10. Sunset Zone 24)

It was nice and warm when I went out and sat on the patio to check the babies. I really think the cement pad is helping. I took all out to check and am glad I did, found slugs in the bottom of the box.

I have 3 of 3 Sally Holmes, not sure they skipped a beat and still have the original leaf set left on the cutting

4 of 4 Belinda's Dreams, some not as wonderful as others, but all with little white roots peaking out of the bottom of their band pots

2 of 2 Leonie Lamesch (busy growing and will be the first to pot up at this rate)

2 of 2 Day Breaks (Musks)

2 of 2 Cornelia (Musk) only I hope this is a good clone because they came off a plant that does not bloom so who really knows what they will be or if my conditions will be different enough to do something. This is where Kim's advice about the spent blooms is important because I could be growing something else.

2 of 2 Mme Berard! I am excited about this one, they are smaller but I see roots starting out the bottom of pots

2 of 2 Mrs Dudley Cross! after deciding they were iffy at best but probably gonners, low and behold there are roots coming out of the bottom of the pots. This is where I am glad I learned the lesson on not giving up too soon.

2 of 2 Blush Noisettes, lots of little roots on these.

2 of 2 Russellianas

and 1 surprise rose...surprise cause I have no idea what it is and I was going to toss as dead but left hoping I would remember just what I poked in that pot....And Surprise, it is alive.

My little broken off canes from transport of my Vintage Rambler Mystery and Fields of the Wood look dead. But those were all new fresh growth so I was not sure they were going to make it anyway.

Belle Portugaise is looking like a gonner too, but will remember not to give up yet.

Now to keep them alive and growing.

    Bookmark   July 9, 2014 at 11:18PM
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roseseek

Congratulations! With propagation, as with cooking, "watched pots never boil". Leave them alone, give them what they require and pay attention to something else. They'll do what they're supposed to as long as you've stacked the deck in their favor. Good for you! Kim

    Bookmark   July 9, 2014 at 11:58PM
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Kippy(SoCal zone 10. Sunset Zone 24)

No slipping them out of pots to check roots for me. Only looking at what is growing out of the pots already. I used bands since they were bigger and I thought would stay more evenly damp since it was summer and not fall. A plus is the bands fit very nice and tight in the box. I think that is helping them as well.

At what point would you give them a tiny bit of very weak fish fertilizer? I think I will bring over a second box to put some of the larger and faster starting plants so they have more room to spread

    Bookmark   July 10, 2014 at 12:28PM
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roseseek

Once they have roots sticking from the bottom and any new growth appearing, you can begin feeding them WEAKLY. Water well prior to feeding to insure they are well hydrated then give them a light feeding. Baby food for people is never as strong, concentrated, as "grown up food". Use the same method of feeding these. Kim

    Bookmark   July 10, 2014 at 1:13PM
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zeffyrose_pa6b7(6b7)

Josh-----congratulations------It is so exciting to have this kind of success----
I used to have access to plastic 5 gal. water bottles---My DH cut the bottoms out which enabled me to use them as greenhouses-----I had great success with propagating---this was before I started having serious back problems which limits any gardening for me------
Making your own rose bushes is very rewarding--I always loved doing it----
Florence

    Bookmark   July 11, 2014 at 6:50PM
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