Garlic not coming up in spring after sprouting before winter

marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)April 14, 2012

Hi folks,

I planted garlic before this past "winter" (it wasn't much for anyone in NA it seems) and mulched it with leaves. It started producing green stalks before the snow fell and now that spring is springing I only have one bulb which is green (I wouldn't be surprised if it just survived the season). So I dug one up today to see what was happening underground, maybe they had rotted or something, but found that it was still firm, white, and had roots that resisted when I gave it a little tug, but there was no sign of it sending out another shoot. Is there any chance that they will resprout or should I replant?

Thanks,

Marc

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wertach zone 7-B SC

johnmurrey14 Go away with your spam.

Marc, Is your soil warm yet? Pull back the mulch to let it warm up more.

I would leave them since you found that it was still firm, white, and had roots that resisted when you gave it a little tug.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2012 at 1:13PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)

I wouldn't call the soil warm exactly, but it's getting there. We've been having these hot bursts (up to 26 celcius today, way above average) and then it dips back down to 10c for a while, even close to zero a few nights, so maybe it's just being confused like every other plant and animal. :) I'll try to remember to follow up if anything happens, thanks for the input.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2012 at 2:12PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wertach zone 7-B SC

Mine has been green all of the strange winter, we had a frost last week after temps in the 70's to 90's (22 to 32 C) with lows above 50 (10+ C)for 6 weeks. They were growing like crazy before the frost! It burned the tips.

Mine usually start growing after the soil temps get above 50F, 10C. If your soil temp, not air temp, is above 10 you should see some life soon!

    Bookmark   April 17, 2012 at 2:35PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
zeedman Zone 5 Wisconsin

My garlic is in a rural plot, which I seldom visit until I begin tilling for Spring planting. I just drove out to check on the garlic, expecting to find it growing vigorously due to out abnormally warm Spring. What I found was roughly half of the bulbs dead or dying due to frost heave. Too many times freezing & thawing.

A layer of mulch would have prevented that, but I've never had much of a problem before, so never saw the need to use mulch... to the contrary, it just increased the weeds. It will be added to my planning from now on, though.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 2:29AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)

I poked around some more yesterday and found one of my shallots, planted next to the garlic, had rotted in the ground so I guess I'm dealing with some mixed results. Not sure if I should sift through the whole allium bed (it's only about (5x5) and replace the ones that didn't survive...

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 9:34AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
naturemitch(3/4 WI)

Hmmm. Wonder if they did rot or something. Our garlic has been up about a month now. Ours have never sprouted in the fall....when did you put your cloves in?

Not much you can do at this time. If they didn't make it, then planting later in the fall might be an option for you next year. We seem to plant shortly before Halloween here...we oftentimes want to get them in a bit earlier, but that never works.

No use replacing in the spring....at least for us. We wouldn't find seed, we wouldn't get bulbs from what we planted or they would be very small if we did, and we have lots of other stuff we have to focus on.

Good luck!

    Bookmark   May 6, 2012 at 3:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)

I just got back from 3 days away while the weather has been warmer and there are little green tips poking through the earth - hooray! I planted it in the fall, I can't remember the exact date.

    Bookmark   May 7, 2012 at 9:33AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wertach zone 7-B SC

Congrats Marc!

    Bookmark   May 7, 2012 at 1:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)

The greens died back and lied there for a bit so I dug them up today. Not much! It looks like they just got a bit fat over the winter. Can we still eat these? They smell like garlic (and one flimsy little shallot).

Marc

    Bookmark   July 8, 2012 at 3:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wolverine1012

Congatulations on your success. We gardeners sure are an impatient lot when it comes to sprouting, aren't we?
Sure, you can eat them. Or separate the cloves and replant this fall.

    Bookmark   July 8, 2012 at 7:10PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)

Perhaps it's not obvious from the photo but there are no cloves to separate! They are nearly the same as when I planted them except it looks like they've gotten a bit fat over the winter. Looking more like tiny onions than garlic.

    Bookmark   July 10, 2012 at 9:35AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gemini_jim(7 MD)

What you have are "rounds," which is what a garlic plant will produce if it doesn't have the resources to make a full divided bulb. As mild as the winter was, if you had significant top growth before a cold snap, it may have killed the tops, leaving the cloves with little resources to grow on. Or maybe the soil is extremely poor/sandy. Or they were planted too close.

But what you said about them growing tops in the fall
and then none in the spring makes me think they were planted too early.

I would plant no sooner than mid October. That way they will establish roots but not too much of a top before cold weather hits. Also make sure to mulch them well with straw or leaves, and make sure there is plenty of organic matter in the soil. In the spring they will need adequate fertility and moisture to reach their full potential, but should be allowed to dry down a bit before harvesting.

Hope this helps,
Jim

    Bookmark   July 12, 2012 at 8:39AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marcguay(5b, Montreal, QC)

Helps a ton, thanks Jim.

I presume these "rounds" can be eaten the same way as garlic is?

    Bookmark   July 12, 2012 at 11:02AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gemini_jim(7 MD)

Yes, they can be eaten just like cloves. Or they can be planted in the fall. If everything goes well they should form divided bulbs next year. BTW the skinny divided one on the right looks like a shallot and not a garlic to me.

    Bookmark   July 12, 2012 at 11:51AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Grow Own Onion Sets?
Just wonder if it is a good idea to grow own onion...
redsun9
Starting onions indoors from seeds, in pots?
Can onions be started by planting maybe 50 or more...
dab07
Saving Onion Seed
Last spring I picked a few of the best onions I had...
steve333_gw
Garlic Plants are Coming Up (Fall 2014)
I planted some garlic bulbs about 2-3 weeks ago. And...
redsun9
Do oriental alliums (globe master, etc) have flimsy leaves?
it has been raining pretty good and none of my other...
pinkkpearls
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™