Tsau Ping Lak, Atalantia buxifolia

zorba_the_greek(9)April 11, 2009

If you Google the Atalantia buxifolia (formerly Severinia buxifolia) you will find several credentialed sites and publications with degreed authors saying the citrus tree has an edible part. Almost all the experts say the leaves are used to make a yeast roll in Chinese cooking. At least one book says the berries are used to make the yeast rolls. Which is it? Leaves or berries? And how are they used?

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Violet_Z6(6a)

I see you've posted all over the internet in search of a response. It's most likely both, though some people might use leaves, others the berries. I'd assume at least the grapes are allowed to ferment in order to create the yeast. This method is used in Europe and here for artisanal breads. Most of what you found in your original research appears to be all from the same source.

    Bookmark   April 20, 2009 at 9:23AM
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wynnho

I think it could also be the leaves. In a one of the YT videos (and a few online articles) about pickling, a few plants were mentioned and their LEAVES were/are still used in some countires in Asia and Russia for fermentation. I think leaves are used to age soy tempeh, too. Certain species of plants have their own special micro-organisms growing on their leaves.

Id on't know about this particular citrus, though.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2015 at 7:16AM
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