Help With Vietnamese Dua Gang

roger33(7)September 14, 2009

A friend of mine is going to give me some seeds for the Vietnamese melon Dua Gang. She doesn't grow them but knows somebody that does. Can anybody shed a little light on how to grow this melon? I'm guessing it grows on the ground like a watermelon. What about spacing of the seeds? Any help would be appreciated.

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fiddlerchick(10 Los Angeles)

Wow! You've sure got me beat with that one. I searched all over the internet and couldn't find anything at all about that particular melon.....I hope someone can give you information about it.

I just got started with melons this year and today ate the first of my Israeli Ha'Ogens - it was delicious!! Also, in the course of my great melon experiment this past summer I got the impression that melons will tolerate pretty ridiculous conditions, so I don't think you have to worry too much about the spacing - just give them a reasonable amount of room. (I grew mine all crammed together with several stalks of corn in wine barrels and had them climb up a trellis I built and set against a concrete block wall in the parking area behind our little duplex.)

As a group, melons are hungry, thirsty summer annuals, so be sure to plant the seeds in at least decent soil after it gets warm enough, and then give them plenty of water and food (compost, worm tea, organic fertilizer, whatever you usually feed your plants), and they should be fine.

Please let me know how the dua gangs turn out!

Good luck,

Brenda K

    Bookmark   September 24, 2009 at 12:39AM
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roger33(7)

I think I will plant them the same as Cantaloupe. After all they look like Honey Dews on the inside and taste like unsweetened Cantaloupes. From what I've heard they grow best and produce the most fruit on a trellis. The seeds look just like Cantaloupe seeds. I've looked all over the web for anything about this plant also and came up empty handed. The ones I've seen weigh about 3 lbs. After being picked they say to leave them on the kitchen counter until they turn soft. Cut the same as any melon. Sprinkle sugar on them then they are good to eat. Kind of bland if you ask me. Maybe if I eat them before they turn soft they might be sweet. My wife is Vietnamese so she and her friends will love them.

    Bookmark   September 28, 2009 at 12:52AM
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Violet_Z6(6a)

Dua Gang (cucumis melo) is in the musk melon family.

You should be able to grow them relatively easily in LA, CA.

Here is a link that might be useful: Growing Melons in California

    Bookmark   October 8, 2009 at 7:46PM
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rph_qt_yahoo_com

You would grow it in full sun on the ground like all melons. Keep them 6 to 12 inches apart. Taste best when fully ripe (when skin turned yellow and cracked a bit). Remove the skin and cut the melon meat in chunks, sprinkle some sugar, add in crushed ice and serve.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaJGBcCIAf0

    Bookmark   April 16, 2011 at 1:57AM
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roger33(7)

Thanks for the video Kimmi. I had great success with them last year. I myself don't really care for them but the Vietnamese people in my neighborhood really enjoyed them. They are already asking me for more this year. Looks like I will have to plant more than last year.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2011 at 9:49AM
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