Moso vs Giant Japanese Timber

vancleaveterryFebruary 11, 2008

Phyllostachys heterocycla f. pubescens "Moso" verses Phyllostachys bambusoides "Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo".... If a person already has one [Moso in my case] is there any reason to have the other?

Can someone contrast the two for me?

Terry

MS coast

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kentuck_8b(__)

I think there's always a reason for 'another' bamboo.

Moso is a stronger-culmed bamboo and will probably get a bit larger, but takes longer to mature and reach large size. It is a more delicate looking bamboo. Giant Japanese Timber breaks easily when covered in snow(I'm told). It doesn't do very well down here, but Moso does.

Kt

    Bookmark   February 11, 2008 at 9:52PM
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tnangela

Madake is a lot more cold hardy than Moso here in Tennessee...a lot better choice for zone 7.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2008 at 3:17PM
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vancleaveterry

Kentuck in TX.... You say that "Giant Japanese Timber breaks easily when covered in snow(I'm told). It doesn't do very well down here, but Moso does."

Why do you suppose it doesn't do well in TX? Not snow problems I imagine?

Angela in TN... thanks also

    Bookmark   February 15, 2008 at 7:19AM
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kentuck_8b(__)

No snow problems here, that's for sure, but I'm not sure why it doesn't do well. I planted both P. bambusoides aka GIANT JAPANESE TIMBER and P. bambusoides 'Castillon' here and both have struggled.

They both started good the first couple of years, then they slowly regressed and I have a hard time just keeping them going by Summer's end.

My guess would be that they don't like the high heat, which especially during the years they really did bad, was extremely high for this area, 100+F. I think in cooler Summer regions they both would do better.

Moso does great but is very slow to reach large size. Henon, Bory, Nigra, and Tonkin Cane are a few other runners that do really well here, although the Nigra and the Tonkin Cane like it somewhat shady.

Good Luck

Kt

    Bookmark   February 15, 2008 at 4:05PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

P. vivax has thin walls and breaks under snow. P. bambusoides has thick walls. I haven't seen it break. P. vivax is lush and vigorous, with large leaves. P. bambusoides gets full of aphids. Moso is more beautiful than either.

    Bookmark   February 16, 2008 at 3:19AM
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bobs_bamboo

I have both growing. The Japanese had about 4 years starting in bathtub. 2 years ago I've diveded and moved to a couple places. Now sprouts get about 14' tall. How long will it to get at least 40'?

    Bookmark   November 25, 2010 at 5:24PM
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Vanessa-roof-garden(8)

Hi kentuck_8b, I am also located in TX, I am thinking of get a couple of Moso plants too, but not sure if they are suitable for the local climate (austin area, very hot summer and dry). Do you need to water them during the dry season? Thanks.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2014 at 5:20PM
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stevelau1911

I've found that moso will curl its leaves if there's high heat with low humidity which rarely occurs up here in upstate NY, but once it reaches a decent size, there should not be any problems growing this plant.

I think the key may be to give it some shade protection until it gets big enough to handle itself. Here's a recent picture of mine.

    Bookmark   September 14, 2014 at 12:40AM
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cousinfloyd

Steve, it looks like your bamboo is yellow with green grooves. Is that moso?

    Bookmark   March 5, 2015 at 3:16AM
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stevelau1911

Yes it is. It is moso bicolor. There are over a dozen cultivars of moso, and many of them are colored types.

    Bookmark   March 5, 2015 at 9:02AM
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cousinfloyd

Thanks for the response, Steve. Is it still velvety in the juvenile stage like "regular" moso and does it lack the swollen area above each node like regular moso? I have a yellow bamboo with green grooves that I'd like to identify.

    Bookmark   March 5, 2015 at 9:08AM
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stevelau1911

The do appear just like regular moso, but new shoots will be velvety for a few months after they emerge. It appears like this cultivar has smaller and slimmer leaves with more of an elegant look than the heavier set moso.

It is a slower grower than regular moso, but I like it's ornamental appearance, and I believe the size potential is just about the same. I'm growing in upstate NY so it probably won't ever get to its full potential, but it's still very rewarding to have in the garden.

    Bookmark   March 5, 2015 at 9:16AM
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