How long does it take to grow a tree?

sunfrog(z8 Az)August 17, 2005

How long does it take to grow a tree from seed?

The reason I ask is because I just read another thread and people were saying they love Chinese Pistache trees. So I looked them up on Google and found pics and a place that sells them in quart and gallon sizes. So when I see a tree in quart size how long has it been growing and how many years would it save to buy it in gallon size?

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lazy_gardens

The best size for trees is a 5-gallon size, from a LOCAL nursery, so you can see what you are buying.

    Bookmark   August 17, 2005 at 10:12PM
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tomatofreak(Z9 Phx USA)

"It is futile to plant an acorn in the morning and expect that afternoon to sit in the shade of an oak."

Antoine St.Exupery

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 1:23AM
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MaryMcP Zone 8b - Phx AZ

Very acceptable growth rate for Chinese Pistache, is 2-3 feet of growth possible each year with good management.

"The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second best time is now." Chinese proverb. ;-)

I have been told that it is better to buy a smaller size tree to begin with as it adapts better to the transplant. Although I think a gallon size is not too large. I had been thinking of buying a super large, already mature tree for about $500. HTH. Mary

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 7:55AM
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jkochan(Z9b)

We planted 2, 36" and 1, 24" box trees last october. Chinese (Evergreen) elms and a Jacaranda in that order. All three took off in the spring with impressive growth. With a good tree selection, proper planting, and correct watering and fertizing your trees should do well. At the risk of opening up old wounds, this pretty much rules out Moon Valley unless you are there to make sure that 1: you acutally got the tree you selected, 2: you supervise the digging of the correct size planting hole and 3: ignore their care instructions and see the FAQ's on this site. The most important thing to look for in my opinion beside the obvious health of the tree is the trunk thickness compared to the overall height of the tree. Growers and Nurseries have a tendency to push the verticle growth to make the trees appear larger and more attractive. This gives a spindly trunk that needs to stay staked at least twice as long as should be necessary.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 1:05PM
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MaryMcP Zone 8b - Phx AZ

Jim, That's some good info but could you further define "impressive growth"? I was thinking of planting one or two elm trees. Am also considering the Chinese pistache. We want lots of shade....quickly...of course. Is fall the best time to plant trees?

Thanks.
Mary

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 1:49PM
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jkochan(Z9b)

Mary,
The canopy size of the trees increased by 1/3 and the height by about 2 feet. When planted, the two elms were 8'tall. Mine are still staked because of the thin trunk syndrome. Based on the growth patterns of my neighbors' elms and barring any severe freezes here in Chandler I expect these two elms to top 15'to 18' in the next two years. The Jacaranda was 12' when planted and is 14' now. One other option though it still uncertain as to how well they do here is the Empress/Sapphire Dragon Tree, Paulownia kawakamii. This tree has a phenomenal rate of growth, up to 30Â in three years. In general they all need heavy pruning as least every other year to maintain their shade canopy without going "leggy" Do a search on it and read everything you can find. There is an Arizona Nursery that sells these in Cottonwood or Kingman or someplace like that. This probably the closest thing to instant shade that there is. I would have tried one if IÂd known about them before I planted the Ch.Elm.Âs.

Here is a link that might be useful: Dragon Tree

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 2:40PM
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jkochan(Z9b)

Sorry, I forgot the last half of your question. I like to plant in Late Sept./Early Oct. It's still warm enough for growth but not as hot as to stress the trees too badly. With a good rooting fertilizer and deep watering, it will help the trees establish their root systems over the winter months and get them off to a faster start in the spring.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 3:00PM
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Desert_Heat

Of all the trees in our yard the Chinese pistache has been the slowest growing. It is no where close to being a shade tree and is 8-10 years old. I love the tree nonetheless especially when the leaves turn color. If you are looking for instant shade, unless you want to buy a really big one to begin with it probably isn't the best choice though. Chinese Elm is a pretty quick growing tree. Ours dwarfs the Pistache. Fan Tex ash provides a golden yellow fall display and while it hasn't been an instant shade tree for us it has grown much faster than the pistache. Our Mesquite was our "instant shade tree" in our Western facing backyard.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2005 at 6:48PM
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sunfrog(z8 Az)

Ooohh, Chinese Elm Tree is pretty. I googled it. Thanks for all the great advice! I'll wait til mid September. That'll give me time to dig the hole for it. lol

    Bookmark   August 19, 2005 at 6:40AM
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tomatofreak(Z9 Phx USA)

"The most important thing to look for in my opinion beside the obvious health of the tree is the trunk thickness compared to the overall height of the tree. Growers and Nurseries have a tendency to push the verticle growth to make the trees appear larger and more attractive. This gives a spindly trunk that needs to stay staked at least twice as long as should be necessary."

I'll say! Wish I had read that a couple years ago - before I bought 3 of my present trees. Next time out I'll be looking at the trunk first. Who cares if it's 'squatty' if it's got good form. At least it will have a good base from which to grow up. My neighbor planted two tall spindly trees next to my yard to shade her roof. They have leaned over so far, the only shade they're likely to throw is in *my* yard.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2005 at 12:32PM
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Pagancat(Phoenix, AZ)

Hope you like 'em, Tommy!

FYI, the Chinese Elm can look kinda weird as a youngster - don't let that put you off. There's actually a couple of cultivars out there, one has the "lace bark" which I think is really attractive, not that the regular bark is bad, either.

The info I was given is that a 10-15 gallon tree can meet or exceed the growth of 24" box tree in 3 years (sorry for the waffling, it's been a couple years since I heard it). Should AZtreelvr come around, she'll give you the exact facts.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2005 at 3:05PM
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samwilson3d

Sometimes it's not just about how long it takes to grow, but how long before it will produce

Here is a link that might be useful: Fast-growing trees Arizona

    Bookmark   May 20, 2009 at 8:38AM
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petzold6596(8b southern NM)

Chinese Pistachio trees do not product edible fruit. They grow to 25-30 x 20-25 feet at about 1-2 ft/year once established. Smaller tree establish much faster than larger ones. A quart size is about two yrs and a gallon is about 5 yrs. I hope this answers your question and clarified other posted misinformation.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2009 at 6:57PM
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desertmama_bhc

Hi there ! my town (Bullhead City AZ)in conjunction with the local power company, offer trees to the residents each November...a maximum of 3 at $6 each; they also require a statement from you as to which side of your residence the trees will be planted...A good service at great prices !

For the last two November I have purchased four willow acacias,one chilean mesquite and one desert willow...all were small enough to fit in the trunk of my car, about two feet tall. they are planted on east, south and west sides...

The ones that really amazes me are the willow acacias ! The first one I planted on southwest corner, grew FOUR FEET in one year...it is now over seven feet tall ! I have not trimmed or pruned, I like trees in their natural state when possible...this also protects the tender trunks of the newly planted trees.

How's that for "fast" ??

    Bookmark   June 11, 2009 at 11:37AM
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elishatusubira_gmail_com

Dear Sir / Madam

I would like to know how long it takes eucalyptus trees to grow to the size of an electric pole.

Thank you

Elisha

    Bookmark   April 7, 2011 at 8:21AM
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phxplantaddict

3 years 4 months 18 days and 6 hours.

    Bookmark   April 7, 2011 at 10:29AM
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toucan(9)

If I already bought a tall spindly tree, what do I do now to get the trunk bigger or get it as healthy as possible?

    Bookmark   April 7, 2011 at 1:09PM
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