Trimming back

Laura81September 10, 2013

When would be a good time to trim this plant back and can I trim it to about 2 feet tall?

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GeeS 9b

I would wait until winter. You can trim it way down and make it ugly as hell. It will recover and look fine after a few weeks of spring growth.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2013 at 9:09PM
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Laura81

That is sort of what I thought but I thought I would consult the experts. Thanks.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2013 at 9:29PM
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MaryMcP Zone 8b - Phx AZ

I would definitely wait until it's not as pretty as it is now. :-))

My neighbor has a landscaping crew that cut back these gorgeous bushes just before they blushed. Damn. They are so ugly now with bare spots and dead twigs showing through.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2013 at 10:02PM
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Laura81

It is pretty now. I didn't think it bloomed ever and then it rained and it was full of blooms.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2013 at 10:18PM
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dlg421

As GermanStar says, wait until December or January and then trim it to whatever size you want. Any trimming now will eliminate the blossums.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2013 at 1:01AM
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campv

Here in Camp Verde mine goes dormant in the winter and loses all its leaves, that's when I trim and shape. They do have a tendency to get leggie.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2013 at 5:17PM
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AZRoboTech

What kind of plant is it?

    Bookmark   September 12, 2013 at 4:09AM
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MaryMcP Zone 8b - Phx AZ

That's a Texas Sage

    Bookmark   September 12, 2013 at 8:18AM
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cms_az

Isn't it best to wait until there is no chance of frost to cut it back? I trimmed mine all the way back in March and they came back just fine.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2013 at 7:09PM
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dlg421

They are not frost sensitive so the timing is not that critical. March is about the latest that you would want to do a major cutback.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2013 at 8:29PM
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dlg421

They are not frost sensitive so the timing is not that critical. March is about the latest that you would want to do a major cutback.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2013 at 8:30PM
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glendale_gardener(9)

Just saw this thread and I too had the same question. We have about ten of these bushes, somewhat overgrown on our property (last owner let them go a bit). I asked a landscaping guy and he said after the last frost (mid-Feb) but I think we'll do it earlier given the notion that they are not susceptible to frost.

Thank you!

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 10:31AM
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GeeS 9b

Frost susceptibility isn't really the point. The point is that cutting these things back the way they usually should be cut back (i.e. severely) oft leaves them rather unsightly. By waiting until after the last frost, you minimize the time they remain unsightly. If that isn't a concern, have at it!

This post was edited by GermanStar on Wed, Nov 6, 13 at 20:24

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 6:37PM
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aztreelvr

Keep in mind that severely cutting them back (aka renewal, rejuvenative pruning) can only be done once every 4 -5 years because its so stressful on the plant.

After renewal pruning follow 'natural' or 'selective' pruning practices to keep them looking good. Also watch the water. Texas Sage (Leucophyllum) can survive on minimal water and too much makes them grow like crazy.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2013 at 5:39PM
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GeeS 9b

^ Guy down the street from me does it annually, to no ill effect so far -- not that I disagree with your assessment.

    Bookmark   November 11, 2013 at 2:31PM
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glendale_gardener(9)

Newbie question, sorry: Can silver cassia also be cut back like the Texas Sage? We just recently bought our house and the previous owner had overwatered the plants and had them pruned in such rounded shapes that the plants are over grown and have bare patches of growth or sticks for their interiors. We'd like to cut everything back (several Texas Sages and Silver Cassias) then begin again with more natural pruning techniques. Thanks for the help!

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 4:03PM
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