Mass extinction

garyfla_gw(10 Florida)January 3, 2006

Hi

Are there any good books that deal with this subject from a botany standpoint.?? Lots of stuff on dinosaurs flying reptiles and giant mammals. In fact i can't even find a listing of any extinct genus??

Thanks gary

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tabs(Aust)

I have come across a few for Australian plants that give reference to rare, endangered and extinct plants while I was studying conservation and land managment. Mind you not hard in Australia, we,ve managed to kill of enough species in the last 200 years

    Bookmark   January 4, 2006 at 4:16PM
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garyfla_gw(10 Florida)

Hi
Was mostly interested in the K-T extinction but anything would be great lol.
gary

    Bookmark   January 7, 2006 at 4:57AM
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albert_135(Sunset 2 or 3)

At scholar.google a search for... plant OR plants "k t extinction" ....gets about 44 ghits so no guarantees but there may be some serious material out there.

    Bookmark   January 7, 2006 at 1:37PM
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jambu

How about a general topic search for books under "paleobotany" first--then see if there are chapters or other references to book/literature specific to KT extinction, or a specific taxon, etc.

Maybe this link will let you play a little to see what plants have been documented in the fossil record.

Here is a link that might be useful: search database of taxon

    Bookmark   January 8, 2006 at 1:14PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Yes, unfortunately, when you say "mass extinction" it sounds like you are asking about what is happening right now.

    Bookmark   January 22, 2006 at 11:06PM
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garyfla_gw(10 Florida)

Hello
Well have found nothing specific to plants but did find
some attempts to understand when and where.Apparently the understanding of the K-T extinction was much slower than previously thought.Involving several million years rather than a single sharp event.
As to plant speciation it seems the first ice age decimated at least 3/4 of plant specie. To me this is one of the most interesting as what's more important to plants than temps.?? Apparently extinction is the rule of life rather than the exception. I think this event is far more difficult to explain..Oh well, more to read
Gary

    Bookmark   January 23, 2006 at 7:12AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Nothing like a mile thick sheet of ice to put a damper on things.

    Bookmark   January 23, 2006 at 11:32PM
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The_Mohave__Kid(Nevada)

"Apparently the understanding of the K-T extinction was much slower than previously thought.Involving several million years rather than a single sharp event. "

Yeah ... geologist though still would call that a blink of the eye ( believe it or not ) .. so time is relative !

Good Day ...

    Bookmark   January 26, 2006 at 9:59PM
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TonyfromOz(z10 NSW Aust)

Just getting back to your original question, I would have thought that the vast majority of named fossil plants represent extinct species, especially those from before about the mid-Tertiary. In fact you would be hard-put to find any from the Cretaceous or earlier that are clearly conspecific with a living plant. I doubt that even the Ginkgo and the Wollemi Pine fossils are quite identical with the modern species. Many plant fossils belong to families, orders or classes that are totally extinct, e.g. all the 'seed fern' groups.

I am no expert on plant fossils, but would guess that many thousands have been given names. The major problem has been establishing which fossil leaf, stem, or wood belongs with which flower, fruit, cone, seed, etc, as most fossils are only frgaments of the plant.

As for where you can access names of fossil plants, I suspect most are in musty old volumes and specialist periodicals in museum libraries. Perhaps there is a fossil plant equivalent of the IPNI database, but where?

    Bookmark   January 27, 2006 at 8:06AM
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garyfla_gw(10 Florida)

Hello
Would you believe I found 3 times more info than i ever wanted to know on Wilkipedia?? lol Even the latest info on those fantastic fossils being found in China.
From the Cambrian explosion to the Permian- Triassic extinction. to the KT extiction.
Fascinating reading.
gary

    Bookmark   January 27, 2006 at 9:59AM
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