Camellia oleifera in November

Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VANovember 23, 2013

Just an oleifera species camellia. Yet quite hardy and you can see the blooms from a distance, even though up close they're really nothing special.

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jamesmaloy

Dave it"s nice to see the photos. Do you grow these for the flowers or for making tea?
James in Florida

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 1:27AM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

Hi,

To my knowledge C. oleifera is not grown for tea. It was (and is) grown in Asia for the oil. Another name is Tea-Oil or Oil-Seed camellia.

For me this is just a very hardy fall-blooming species that eventually forms a nice small tree with cinnamon-colored bark. So I grow it for it's evergreen-ness and to some degree, the flowers. But, I have some hybrids which are more interesting. So I may eventually take this one out.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 12:40PM
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luis_pr

Interesting. I saw one camellia at a local nursery yesterday whose petals were similar to your oleifera (but with a tint of pink on the petal edges); the petals had fallen in some sections of the plant and I thought to myself thst the plant look better with only the yellow anthers (or whatever they are called) still on than with the whole flowers still on.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 5:17PM
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