growing succulents in humid louisiana...help!

rachpreachJuly 16, 2013

Alright this is my first post and before this I have been doing tons of reading through the other posts to avoid asking redundant questions. I live in Louisiana where it is really humid right now. I bought some succulents with out knowing fully what the requirements for soil were. I originally used about half of miracle grow moisture control and 1/3-1/2 perlite. Well my plants have gone down hill. Lost some to root rot because of too much moisture in the soil. As you can see from my pics I have them planted in the center in a wooden box that has multiple drain holes. I have since unpotted everything and i am letting them lay out for a few until i can figure out my soil requirements. From what I read, for the easiest and cheapest soil formula, is to use C&S soil mixture with perlite. My question is will this be good enough for me with how humid it is? Or should I add something additional? REMEMBER I would prefer suggestions of materials that I've actually heard of and can get pretty easily. Thanks!

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rachpreach

Here's one of plants. It looks even more sad now. It's got a weird texture to its leaves.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 1:18AM
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rachpreach

And another sad plant. This one has lost a lot of its bottom leaves.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 1:21AM
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bob61

I also live in Louisiana and from what I can see your plants are exposed to rain. What I have done with plants in ground which is essentially what you are doing is to put them in a layer of at least 1 inch of pea gravel. Probably more if you live in south Louisiana. For potted plants I buy the cheap topsoil at Home Depot ( it has no peat moss in it)and screen it with 1/4 mesh to get the larger pieces out and mix 1 part of it with 2 parts perlite and one part chicken grit which is crushed granite. You can get it at your local farmers coop. For the in ground plants I remove most of the soil from the plants before planting. Fertilizing once a month with a balanced fertilizer at half strength will keep them happy. In north Louisiana we don't get near the rainfall the south gets but when it does it can be overwhelming for the plants. Just remember good drainage is everything for these plants no mater where they are located. Hope this helps.

Bob

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 6:59AM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

Your planter might be giving a structural problem to your situation. If the spaces between the wood slats are swollen shut, A large percentage of the water collected on the whole surface might be going to the hole that is the planter. That might be compounding the moisture problem. Maybe one needs to make more holes in the bottom of the container. Also I see that the perlite that you are using is the fine perlite. The big and chunky (harder to find) perlite is better.. I use screen over my holes.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 8:37AM
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rachpreach

well i went to the local nursery and bought the potting soil that they use for all their succulents and mixed it with some perlite(chunky kind) about half and half maybe. I think this will work better than what I was using which was miracle grow moisture control that also had ferts in it. the lady at the nursery said succulents dont do well with ferts in the soil. Their succulents were beautiful so I took her advice on the soil combination.

Wantonamara- Im not sure what you mean about my box I have them in. There are quite a few holes drained in the bottom of the box and the entire coffee table is on wheels so I roll it out in to the sun when its sunny and back under my covered patio when its raining. Would rolling them out into the direct sun light not be ideal? Otherwise its pretty shady under my patio so Im not sure how much light they would get.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 10:13PM
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rachpreach

Here it is under the patio. I move it forward during the day for more direct sunlight.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 10:22PM
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rachpreach

Here is how the box is constructed into the coffee table.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 10:24PM
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rachpreach

I guess I could go buy some chicken grit from the tractor supply if yall think that would make my soil even better. I just want to succeed at these plants!

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 10:45PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

The table top might make more water flow into the pot than if it was a pot alone. It depends on how the top slopes and if the cracks are swollen shut, It would mean that the area might drain into the pot area , or part of it might drain into the pot. Maybe none will drain into the pot. If one gets a lot of rain, this might be an issue, but if the drainage in the soil is addressed, then it becomes less of an issue. It would never be an issue where I live but maybe where you are. Can't say.

Nice table.

I fertilize my Echeveria with a low nitrogen fertilizer diluted to 1/4the normal.

I hope you did not water them right away after repotting. It is best to let roots callus in dry soil. Let these guys dry out for awhile. I would have looked for rotten roots and cut them off, dusted cuts with cinnamon (natural fungicide) and let them callus fore a couple of days. this is good to do with all succulents. I can't remember if anyone mentioned that.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 11:10PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

You might need more holes in the bottom. Use screen over the holes. I only see the holes in the center. If it is under the cover, one does not have to worry about rain but Echeveria like a good bit of morning sun and the green plant , crassula capitella "Campfire" need a good bit of sun with some afternoon shade. It will turn a glorious red on the edge. All these plants will etiolate (get stretched out) if they do not get enough sun. People are going to get tired of me showing this pot of plants. I just showed it to someone looking for an ID.

.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 11:24PM
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rachpreach

Like I said before. There are quite a few holes in the bottom of the box. But I might add a few more when I take the soil out yet again and add the chicken grit. Lol. This will be the third time doing repotting because of soil. I guess I'll just judge how much sun they need and roll the table back and forth from underneath the patio.
And I didn't water right away because the soil was kinda moist. I figured I'd let it dry out and then water.
How much chicken grit should I add to what I have now? It's about half soil and half perlite. What should the texture feel like?

    Bookmark   July 17, 2013 at 12:03AM
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rachpreach

I also have a ton of pea gravel. Would that benefit to add to the soil?

    Bookmark   July 17, 2013 at 1:42AM
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Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

Rach, I've done a similar thing. Far too new to these plants also to advise, but wanted to let you know you have company. It's humid here too, and raining at least once a day for the past month, hard to keep moving plants into sun (cloudy haze,) then out of rain, constantly. Hard to complain much though, it's keeping temp from breaching 90 most days, saving big $ on A/C compared to other Junes/Julys.

    Bookmark   July 17, 2013 at 10:54AM
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rachpreach

Tomorrow I plan on getting pine bark fine from petco(the reptile bedding), because its on sale, then Im getting some turface, and also some chicken grit. Should I completely omit the original soil all together? I just want to do this right.

    Bookmark   July 17, 2013 at 10:47PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

Actually you can add equal parts pinebark and chicken grit and turface and add to the soil and it should be fine. Mixing soil is like cooking if you keep the ratios of tings in mind, the actual recipe can stray all over the place. I never make soil twice the same way. I look what is hanging around and go for it. I try not to over think things. But that is me. Others here are much more scientific and exact than me. I never could follow a recipe in the kitchen . If you have a conceptual understanding than there are infinite variations that will work.

It is humid right now. We have had three days of on and off rain in July and that is very odd for Central texas. I just moved my Agave utahensis eborispina under the shed roof. Normally I would say that I do not know how gritty that you need to make it for coastal louisiana. I would err on the grittier than 50%., maybe 60 %. If you make it too lean, you will need to add nutrients .

    Bookmark   July 17, 2013 at 11:36PM
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rachpreach

So I just bought this big bag of landscapers mix at lowes and the ingredients say "landscapers mix" it was only $2.33 so I said what the hey. It looked like a mixture of small pine bark and soil. Most pine bark. I'll post a pic once I get home. Anyone know of it?

    Bookmark   July 18, 2013 at 10:17AM
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greenlarry(UK 8/9)

Try using cat litter instead of perlite or grit! Unlike grit its porous so it traps air which the roots need to flourish. Also it holds water well without being waterlogged. I use like a 70/30 to 50/50 mix depending on thw plant. Only give water when its sunny and make sure it drains out the bottom almost straight away.

    Bookmark   July 18, 2013 at 2:31PM
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rachpreach

Well I'm not going to use cat litter. I've already bought grit. And here is the picture of the landscaper mix that I bought. It looks pretty good to me. Wheat do y'all think?

    Bookmark   July 18, 2013 at 8:27PM
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rachpreach

Here is my mix, pine bark, turface, and chicken grit. I didn't really add much potting soil. It was a personal choice due to how humid it is here. The predominant ingredient is pine bark.

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 5:38PM
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rachpreach

Plants potted

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 5:40PM
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rachpreach

Another pic

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 5:41PM
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drebenc(9a)

It looks pretty!!! While I don't have much advice (being a newbie in South Louisiana myself) I have been keeping up with this thread to learn a thing or two. I love your table and your arrangement. Good luck :)

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 5:46PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

WRONG choice. The pine barck will decay and become water absorbing compost. Pine bark is only good for short term. You are dickering on the wrong side of the Organic/ nonorganic ratio.IMHO. Pine barck should be the minority and the grit and pelite should be the majority of the soil mix.

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 6:02PM
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tsugajunkie z5 SE WI

Due to the high percentage of lignin in pine bark it resists the bacterial breakdown. You'll likely need to repot long before pine bark turns to compost and becomes an issue. I use it in equal parts with perlite and turface for long term potting without issue.

tj

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 6:57PM
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rachpreach

Really?? Wrong choice?? This entire forum talks about using pine bark as the base of the gritty mix of the soil. So that's what I did.

    Bookmark   July 19, 2013 at 9:15PM
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rachpreach

Anyway.... Should I water it in or just wait until the plants need to be watered?

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 7:56AM
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plantlover80(5a-WI)

I'm not the greatest at the needs of these amazing plants to grow. They say they are easy to grow and easy to kill. I have had questions on this web forum and it is amazing how many different ideas and answers you get. Is funny when they start to argue with each other too. If you think you have enough holes at the bottom; I would say your fine. I was going to say root rot but you have repotted enough to know for sure. Just make sure it is a well draining soil. I use (here in Wisconsin, which we have a lot of humidity) 20% potting soil, 20% S&C, 60% perlite. I would use the grit but can't find it around here. Don't use too fine of perlite either. Also, I didn't know how you constructed it but did you put a slight pitch in the pot? That would help too, kinda like a gutter.
Chad

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 9:17AM
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plantlover80(5a-WI)

Also, I would keep them I'm the shade until they rehabilitate too. Then gradually move them into the sun. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong.
Chad

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 9:21AM
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rina_

Gritty mix is 1-1-1, equal parts of ingredients, non of them should be predominant (maybe you confused it with 5-1-1 mix?)

But as many grow in different mixes with success, you may mix it according to your weather and growing conditions.
Most important, make sure it is well drained. Whatever ingredients you use, they should be as close to same size as possible (Chad already mentioned not to use very fine perlite; also mentioned ratios of ingredients used which is not necessarily 1-1-1). Whatever ratios you use, make sure the soil or bark is smaller % of the mix.

I grow most of the succulents in 1-1-1- (gritty mix), using chicken grit. I use perlite but screen it (and rinse) to get larger particles.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 2:07PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

Pine bark should not be used as the base but as the minority portion of the gritty mix as stated many many times. I was not commenting on the use of pine bark but at the amount of pine bark. It should be counted as the organic portion. I usually do all organic at 30 - 20% depending on the plant. IMHO.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 2:29PM
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rachpreach

Well I did a 1-1-1 mix. Pine bark, chicken grit, and turface. And I have many drain holes at the gotten of the box. What I want to know is should I water them in or just wait?

    Bookmark   July 21, 2013 at 10:23PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

DO NOT water them in. I sugest that you wait 4 days to a week. One can thump the table up and down to help settle the dirt. Maybe tap the bottom or the sides with a hammer. The vibration will settle the dirt also.

    Bookmark   July 21, 2013 at 10:31PM
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rachpreach

Ok great! Thanks!

    Bookmark   July 21, 2013 at 10:49PM
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rachpreach

Wantonamara, so if I understood you correctly you were telling me that pine bark is bad if you don't use it in the correct ratio? I know I mentioned that I used it as my predominant base but its mainly an equal part with the turface and chicken grit. Is that good?

    Bookmark   July 23, 2013 at 2:05AM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

Rachpreach, I would "sift" that pine bark and it should be great to use on the 1-1-1 Gritty mix...I use a sifter from the dollar store, something like this to remove all the fine pieces and dust that could cause the mix to stay too wet...

    Bookmark   July 23, 2013 at 3:32PM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

Works great for Jades, succulents and Bonsai potting mix too...

    Bookmark   July 23, 2013 at 3:36PM
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rachpreach

I'm sorry I have so many questions about all this. I just want to make sure I so everything right. If I have a planter box like the one that is my size in my coffee table, with plenty of drain holes that have screens on them, how long should I water them for at one time? I know I've read that they like a good "soaking" instead of more frequent waterings but I don't know exactly what that means. How long? How much water? I was planning on watering them tomorrow since it will have been 7 days since I repotted with the gritty mix.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 1:11AM
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drebenc(9a)

Hello again from south Louisiana, rachpreach! Being on the newish side like you and being here in the humid climate as well, I have the same feelings about watering as yourself. I have been watering once a week because I have been keeping them out of the rain we have been having. It's raining as I type this, by the way! I went to Lowes yesterday and purchased a moisture meter with a long thin probe that you stick in the soil to find out if its dry or not. I know to some that may seem ridiculous, but here with our humidity and not wanting to risk overwatering, I figured what the heck at least until I get more familiar with being able to just look and tell that they need water. It was under $10.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 9:54AM
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rachpreach

Interesting. I might have to get one. So you just water when ever the meter says its dry?

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 11:32AM
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FluffyClou

I've been reading the thread to learn new things - newbie here.
Is Miracle-Gro Perlite considered fine perlite? Thanks.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 12:52PM
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Calzoner(9b)

I prefer to measure the moisture in the soil by using a bamboo skewer stuck down in the soil several inches. When you think you need to water, pull it out and hold it to your cheek or back of your hand. If it feels cool and damp, dont water, warm and dry, water away.

After time, most are able to tell if a plant needs water by picking up the pot (if applicable) and judging by the weight. You will learn the weight of a recently watered container vs. that of a dry container.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 1:04PM
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drebenc(9a)

Yes. There were different ones to choose form, the fancy ones even tested PH levels. I am always worried about the bottom of the soil staying damp here where my fingers can't reach, plus I figure it will also come in handy for my house plants.
I became interested in it after seeing old-n's post on this thread.
http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/cacti/msg070933217251.html?19

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 1:13PM
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rachpreach

So back to my question.... Do you think it's ok to water my plants tomorrow? It's been 8 days tomorrow since repotting. Soil feels dry but it was dry when I repotted.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2013 at 11:02PM
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rachpreach

Ok. Well I watered yesterday. The soil drained very well. It felt pretty dry by that afternoon. I guess that's normal? I just hope they got enough water. At least I know that my soil is well draining!!! And my little cactus purked up from being drooped over. I think I'm going to get one of those soil monitors.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 10:01AM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

Hi rachpreach...I live in hot very humid FL and I water my Jades/succulents about every 7-10 days if we don't get rain, but I do have them planted in the Gritty mix and it drains very well.

Fluffy, I've purchased Miracle grow perlite and a lot of what's inside is fine/dust...I would be very careful (wear a mask) is recommended so the dust does not blow back in your face...I usually rinse or sift all that fine particles/dust and only use the chunkier, medium size pieces and throw the other stuff out.....

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 11:58AM
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rachpreach

Puglvr, does your soil dry out like the day you water it? I stuck my finger down as deep as I could get it in the soil and it felt a little damp. I was just surprised at how much it dried out so fast.

    Bookmark   July 28, 2013 at 11:10PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

That is the idea.

    Bookmark   July 29, 2013 at 12:14AM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

Wantonamara, I forgot to comment your on your gorgeous Campfire...what beautiful colors!! Thanks for posting...
I had one a few years ago and it died (root rot) :o(...soil wasn't drying out during one of our very wet summer rains.. I need to find another, I really miss mine.

Rach, I wouldn't say it dries out the first day (again, because its SO humid) here...but it does dry out quicker than any potting mix I've used...that's what Jades prefer...slightly moist, fast draining and not wet soils...its okay if they're dry for a few days before watering them again...just because it feels dry to your touch does not necessarily mean the plant is completely dry...the turface holds some moisture for the roots...

    Bookmark   July 29, 2013 at 9:05AM
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rachpreach

Well I'm here to say that the advice of you all and my hard work has paid off! My plants are looking great and I have some small baby plants and roots on my cuttings! When I saw those roots and babies it just made everything worth it. :). I had also cut off the tops of some plants that the bottoms had rotted and I just stuck them in the soil and now they have roots too! It's so easy once you have the right components!! The only thing I wish I had was more indirect bright light. Which is something I can't change. I have to push them out into the direct sunlight for about 4 hours a day. I guess I'll see how this works out.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2013 at 11:00AM
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rachpreach

I'm getting a bit discouraged. My succulents are doing ok but I just don't see any definite growth going on. They just seem stagnant. At least the ones in the larger planter box seem that way. The ones that I have planted I the smaller container are actually showing more signs of growth. Just not sure what else to do here. I've included a pic of where I have the coffee table in the morning. I push it out from under the patio at about noon but I try not to put them directly in the sun. Any advice?

    Bookmark   August 4, 2013 at 12:10PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

Your picture is upside down. Some things do not put on growth during the height of the summer if your summer gets very hot. All I can say is patience grasshopper.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2013 at 12:20PM
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rachpreach

Sorry. It doesn't look upside down on my end. I guess you're right. Here is a pic of one of their roots. This guy has been planted for about 3 weeks and the roots look there have been no new growth. Are the dark spots on the leaves ok? I'm just discouraged. When I get into a hobby I want to do it right.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2013 at 12:24PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

The black spot is a bacteria infection. I would spray with Daconil ( available from big box stores) . It is due to heat and humidity. Once I got the daconil, I might pull the leaf but spray to prevent new outbreaks.. The black spot won't go away. When I water, I would try not to get water on the leaves.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2013 at 1:40PM
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cactusmcharris

rach,

If that's your mix in the background, it's much too water-retentive for humid Louisiana. Just my opinion now, but you're always going to have problems such as these with soil like that. It's like this and that .....I'd suggest a load of chicken grit, along with some Turface, to go along with a removal of those larger chips. For leaf succulents such as the ones you like, I don't believe anything but a really gritty mix is going to keep these fungal infections away.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2013 at 2:09PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

I commented on your mix a ways back and I don't usually like to repeat myself, but I do , too often. It is frustrating. That does not look like a 1-1-1 mix to me. It is WAY too brown and fluffy, more of a jungle cactus mix. It does look dry in your picture. Did you shake or sieve out the smaller decomposed stuff. Bark does not equal grit. All that brown stuff holds residual moisture and these plants are not tree jungle cactus. I would think that if you have a hummid condition in your environment, then one should err on the side of more inorganic grit. IMHO.

I know of people who grow in a 85% inorganic mix. Some grow stuff in 100% pumice. Matter of fact I am mixing one up today for a Euphorbia and an opuntia.

If the roots aren't growing it could be because they have rotted off , maybe from before, and the roots that you are looking at are dead and it has to start at the beginning again. Hard to tell. Sometimes the young roots keep rotting if the mix is wrong and too wet.. With succulents, I like to think that roots grow LOOKING for water.

Black spots equal too much moisture or a sloppy watering method. It could be a residual infection from before you repotted. Again, hard to tell.

This post was edited by wantonamara on Sun, Aug 4, 13 at 15:03

    Bookmark   August 4, 2013 at 2:22PM
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rachpreach

Well my potting mixture is super dry. I can't imagine how much more dry the would want it. When I water them it seems to dry out the next day. And it drains very well. So I'm so confused as to what the problem is.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 12:25PM
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cactusmcharris

rach,

Given that these leaf Crassulaceae grow in conditions in their native habitat (have you seen pictures of some of them on the Internet? Many are ravine / cliff-dwellers - see link) quite unlike yours in LA, you perhaps should consider a grittier (less organics) mix, with constant air circulation and protection from rain, if you want to get into Echeverias. What you're trying to do (quite laudable, I find) is a botanical equivalent of spitting in the wind, or something like that. Those fungal infections are, at the root of it, caused by your weather, and you have to take your situation and alter it to grow those things which fly in the face of reason. If you want them spotless, or at least not so heavily marked, stricter measures must be made.

Here is a link that might be useful:

This post was edited by cactusmcharris on Mon, Aug 5, 13 at 12:46

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 12:42PM
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rachpreach

Well not quite sure how to take the info I've gotten. But mainly I've understood that I need to make my soil more gritty due to my humid environment. So I just got through removing half the soil mixture from the planter box and yes there was alot of pine bark more than anything else. So I added more chicken grit, turface, and perlite and mixed mixed mixed. I am going to let it dry out for the afternoon while i go find the antifungal spray for my little darling and his black spot. How does the soil look now?

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 1:48PM
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rachpreach

Here's what it looked like before. Far improvements I must say.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 1:50PM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

That is better. I can see grit in it now.

I would also top dress the soil with a rock top dressing . That helps with soil born diseases and holds down the perlite and soil. I would not water in the evening . You want the leaves to be dry by night. Morning is much better. Also I find if water collects in the rosettes, and is not evaporating fairly quickly,( it might cause rot or fungal infection) I blow the water out.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 2:20PM
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rachpreach

So I went and bought this as suggested. Now I need some guidance as to what to do next. Do I spray the whole plant or just the particular leaf? And how much should I spray? How often?

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 7:33PM
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cactusmcharris

rach,

Start with the directions and treat as an ornamental plant.

Here's something you might have a read of.

Here is a link that might be useful: Echeveria eh?

    Bookmark   August 5, 2013 at 8:14PM
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rachpreach

I read the instructions. Pretty vague. It said to spray until runoff. So I kind of just sprayed the sick leaf and a few of the other leaves without saturating it. The formula is really kinda thick. It says to do it for a 7-14 day period. So I guess I literally do this everyday for 7 days?

    Bookmark   August 6, 2013 at 8:58AM
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rachpreach

On another note, since I was adding more grit to my mix, I had to set my plants off to the side. I checked them thoroughly before replanting them and a lot of them had their root look like this. I assume this is the product of root rot? I used a clean knife and cut the stem to the good part of the stem and then put cinnamon on the end.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2013 at 9:03AM
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rachpreach

Here the all are. You can see some of the bottom leaves are shriveled.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2013 at 9:05AM
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rachpreach

Ughh. I went out there this morning and saw this to one of my plants. The ends of the leaves are all messed up. It's just to the one. I'm seriously wanting to cry. I really need some help guys. Y'all have been wonderful dont get me wrong but I still have so many questions.

    Bookmark   August 8, 2013 at 12:23AM
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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

There are many diseases that can be introduced through rot also. I would spray the leaves and plants with daconil and/or Bayer 3 in one. A drench of the soil IF your unrooted plants are not in it. You are having a bad go of it. All this yanking and doing stuff with the plants in humid hot weather could be stressful but so is going to the doctor and having an operation. Lots of plants do naturally stop growth in the heat of summer, but yours do look sick on top of summer dormancy..

One might look into what plant would like dry hummid shade for that spot. I am not a grower of them but a haworthia and gasterias like a shadier spot and so does sanseveria, christmas cactus, and the arborial jungle cactus. They might need protection. I think it is best to try to match the environment with the plant. some bromeliads would be good possibly. Check what they think on the bromeliad forum..

    Bookmark   August 8, 2013 at 1:53PM
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rachpreach

Well I know the last picture of the crisped leaves are from sunburn. And I have been yanking them in and out of the soil to try to get the soil right, which I finally have. Now I just going to leave them under my patio and hope that there is enough light for them.

When do they start growing again? September-October?

    Bookmark   August 8, 2013 at 7:11PM
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rachpreach

Bump

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 11:34PM
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cactusmcharris

rach,

That's right, the Crassulaceae as a rule (there are exceptions) do much of their growing / flowering in non-extreme temperature times, i.e. spring and fall.

    Bookmark   August 12, 2013 at 10:22AM
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rachpreach

So the shriveling up of the stems is rot? Caused by overwatering? I just don't feel like that's the cause of it.

I just feel like all the plants in the big planter box are just going to crap. The plants in the smaller container are doing pretty good. Do succulents do better in smaller containers?

    Bookmark   August 12, 2013 at 3:53PM
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Pat

Succulents in Louisiana would do best in clay pots of any size. Period. Not wood and not plastic. Good air circulation makes a big difference in high humidity. The coffee table just doesn't make sense down there. Sorry.

    Bookmark   August 17, 2013 at 9:25PM
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rachpreach

Yea. I decided to put them all in pots and I moved them to the front of my house which faces south. Lots more sun. I'm still worried about them getting sunburned. Succulents at the local nursery here are all out in the sun and are doing just fine. When I put mine in the sun they start to get spots on them. I assume that they aren't used to it yet. So I guess we will just see.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2013 at 3:29PM
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whip1 Zone 5 NE Ohio

Any time you make changes like sun exposure, it's best to do it slowly. Plants, just like people, will get sunburn until they get used to the sun.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2013 at 5:51PM
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rachpreach

Ok whip1. I'll try to do that. They are in brighter shade now. After I moved them to the new spot and then I noticed them getting a few sunspots I moved them back a little bit so now they are getting just "bright shade" for now.

And Pots_alot, I appreciate any info you were trying to convey but honestly I'm not sure what exactly the advice was...???

    Bookmark   August 19, 2013 at 1:15AM
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britneylynn1241(8)

rachpreach

I live in central louisiana and new to growing succulents...hints how I came to find this thread. I see that this thread is a bit old but I was wondering if you are still growing them and how they ended up working out for you with the advice that was given? Thanks

    Bookmark   July 20, 2014 at 10:51PM
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