New to this forum and have questions

skeipOctober 23, 2009

I have read throug from oldest to most recent posting before posting myself. Boy, have things gotten sopshisticated fromwhere they started out!! A most impressive pool of knowledge and experience. I have had my clivia since 1980, basic orange variety, blooms off and on. But based on what I have read and distilled, I could be doing several things differently. The original mother plant is long ago given away, but I saved a pup and continued. Most recently divided about 10 years ago, 8 very large offshoots around the main plant in a 10" pot. A very large and impressive plant. But, I realize it needs to be divided as it is starting to heave out of the pot. I can do that in spring before it starts to grow again. After summering outside under the trees, I have moved inside. West facing window but screened by a porch so no direct sun. I have stopped watering / fertilizing. Room it is in is 60 - 68 degrees max in winter. Hasn't flowered in several years. Questions: Should I move it to my basement where it could be in an unheated window? When I repot should I keep only one plant per pot? Should I keep it to only one plant per pot? How often do I repot/ remove the pups? I always thought they liked to be crowded. I can grow a beautiful healthy plant, they just don't bloom that often. Any help would be appreciated.

Steve

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craigr2006

Hi,

Mnay answers to your questions. The first one for me is how to get it to bloom. It sounds mature enough. I would probably give it one good dose of regular liquid/granular fertilizer vs using a bloomrite (0-10-10 type) now. I would let it get some cold exposure, down to perhaps 30-35 (anything below 50F is fine) degrees if possible for a couple hours a day for a couple weeks, then leave it in a darker area. Take it out mid Feb to early March to a warmer spot. Brightness and temps above 70 will make it bloom in the crown. After blooming, I'd split it out. Use a clean blade, but in a big plant, sometimes you just have to get aggressive and hack it. You might lose some smaller ones, but you will probably gain with more flowers and offsets on the bigger ones. I'd treat all the wounds with any antifungal vs root tone and let them dry for a couple days. Then plant up in a good mix with 50% peat and perlite with the rest some sort of organic mulch and water and fertilize every 1-2 weeks for a couple months to get good root growth. In 2 years, you will pribably have some great flowers.

Hopefully this helps.

Craig

    Bookmark   October 26, 2009 at 4:35PM
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meyermike_1micha(5)

Craig you certainly know these plants!!!

Wonder why?..LOL

Thanks for the tips. There are so many different angles I am always learning about these plants because of members like you!

Mike

    Bookmark   October 28, 2009 at 11:43AM
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skeip

Thanks craigr2006! I've been away for a week and just got your tips. That is the direction I will head! I have an unheated / attached garage that stays in the 40's all winter and has a northfacing window. Last time I divided I ended up using a butcher knife!! Thanks again for the info! Steve

    Bookmark   October 31, 2009 at 5:41PM
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craigr2006

Hi Steve,

That sounds about as good as it gets in location and method. The big plants are always a challenge to divide, but they bounce back nicely. Have fun.

Craig

    Bookmark   November 2, 2009 at 9:40AM
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skeip

Just read something on another thread about "gritty mix" potting medium? The picture looked llike nothing I have ever seen. All I have used so far is Fafard Growers Mix. Any info on what this is would be appreciated. Steve

    Bookmark   November 19, 2009 at 5:06PM
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craigr2006

Hi,

I don't know what "gritty mix" consists of, but my guess it is fairly course. It probably has some small bark, pumice, perlite, charcoal, and ??? Clivias can grow in just about any mix. The key is water appropriately for your mix and don't water the crown. A course mix will dry out very quickly and the plants will need to be watered every 1-2 weeks. An organic mix will hold more water, but you will probably need it to completely dry out before the next watering, so as not to induce fungal rot of the roots. I use one of the Sunshine mixes with a lot of peat and some perlite. I then mix in more compost to break up the peat. Even with the peat broken up, when the pot dries, it is hard for the water to penetrate instead of run down the side of the pot, so it is important to find a way to get water to the roots. Hopefully this helps.

Craig

    Bookmark   November 22, 2009 at 8:21PM
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kayjones(Mo6b)

Dr. Craig, about getting water in the crown:

Mine are planted in the ground and rain gets into the crown - no harm SO FAR - is that ok?

    Bookmark   November 23, 2009 at 9:54AM
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craigr2006

Hi Kay,

Mine get water in the crown fairly often. Like you said, rain is common. There is always a risk of this leading to rot. It is more of an issue for potted plants in protected areas. If the water sits in there for a while, bad news. If the air circulates around, then they are generally fine. My special clivias don't get water in the crown. Life happens, but Clivias have survived for eons with getting water in the crown, I just know I've lost some where this is the best explanation. Good luck with your plants this year.

Kind Regards,
Craig

    Bookmark   November 25, 2009 at 12:15AM
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skeip

Five months later and I'm back with a progress report. Of a severly pot bound plant with 8 "plants" in a 12" pot, that has now been in a 40 degree garage since October, two stems have flower spikes coming on. Woohoo!!! Do I move it back into the house and resume watering / fertilizing? You've been right so far Craig, help me with the next step!!

Steve

    Bookmark   March 25, 2010 at 4:19PM
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