Thomasville Citrangequat Zone 6b SUCCESS

rqhansen(4b)April 28, 2012

Just wanted to let everyone know that my Thomasville Citrangequat, grafted on trifoliate, now 10 years old and about 10-12 foot high, originally purchased from Stan McKenzie, has over 100 blooms on it and I just noted that fruit is set. I cannot wait for it to reach edible size. We had a really mild winter, which I am sure helped, but still it is amazing to me that this tree has survived, without ANY protection in our Zone 6a climate here and has seen a low of -3 degrees. It took forever, but finally there is success.

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cearbhaill

He recommended against it for me but now I want to try it anyway :)
I would love to see photos!

    Bookmark   April 28, 2012 at 3:05PM
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mandarin1

That's so wonderful, will be fun to watch them grow through the season, fingers crossed for you! Keep us up to date!

    Bookmark   April 28, 2012 at 5:27PM
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mrtexas(9a)

Don't get your hopes up as to the fruit being edible.

    Bookmark   April 29, 2012 at 1:10PM
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copingwithclay

Why was it grafted to the trifoliate? The T.C. is good on it's own roots.I am currently germinating T.C. seeds for future r/s use. If you use limes, you may be content substituting green T.C.s. If you can enjoy/endure citrus as sour as grapefruit, the T.C.s are milder when orange/ripe. Certainly not in the top 40, but the top 40 won't grow there.......Congrats on the patience and results......

    Bookmark   April 29, 2012 at 10:25PM
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rqhansen(4b)

I will post pictures as soon as I can. I am not a good photographer so bear with me. My understanding is that it is grafted on trifoliate to increase hardiness and to shorten the time to bear(which it certainly has - to anyone contemplating getting one). Cuttings are fine, but they may take much longer to bear. BTW, Stan is a great guy if you are contemplating getting any hardy citrus. I harvested from pot culture, over 20 Satsumas from a tree I got from him (also grafted on Trifoliate). I will keep you all posted.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2012 at 2:40PM
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crispy_z7(7B-8A)

I'm curious how the fruit were. Did they get ripe? How was the taste?
(I have a citrangequat from McKenzie's too, but it is still young)

    Bookmark   March 13, 2013 at 9:40AM
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jacklord(7A)

I also have a Thomasville from McKenzie. I kept it in a pot at first, but then stuck it in the ground (Maryland 7A). No protection at all. It fruited last year.

I harvested the fruit and bit into a slice of one. Quite frankly, it tasted almost exactly like a lime. If someone gave it to me and told me it was some kind of lime, I would have believed it. I did not wretch, choke, foam at the mouth or turn green.

I generally do not eat limes out of hand, so I made a pie out of them. I am no cook or baker and have no culinary skills to boast of. None the less, that pie was so good that it did not make it through the weekend.

I should also mention that mine grows next to a Citrumelo and comes through the winter with much less damage.

    Bookmark   March 14, 2013 at 2:21PM
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fabaceae_native

Thanks so much for reporting this. How exciting!

I've really wanted this plant ever since seeing a big one loaded with fruit at a garden in Athens, GA (8a).

My last concern would be the taste, since I am not dissuaded by the comments of Mr. Texas, but I have to say that a wait of ten years will probably keep me from trying. I don't really understand why the so-called hardy citrus seem to take so long to fruit, as all the grafted citrus I've grown in containers went from spindly little things to fruiting in 2 years or less!

    Bookmark   March 14, 2013 at 4:56PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

Hi fabaceae

Zone 6B gives good growing conditions for 3 months of the year. They have a mediocre spring and fall growing time. Tree in containers however have good spring and fall as well as the 6 month through winter to grow roots if not leaves. The citrus trees in the ground do not the perfect soil or care that potted citrus tree are given. My citrus put on 2/3 of its growth starting 10-20-12, after bringing the tree in for the winter.

The picture is of my Meiwa after 7 75 months from seed sprout.

    Bookmark   March 14, 2013 at 10:45PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

This shows 4 months 1 week from 10-20-12 through the winter to 3-1-13. notice the differences in size

    Bookmark   March 14, 2013 at 10:54PM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

I don't really understand why the so-called hardy citrus seem to take so long to fruit, as all the grafted citrus I've grown in containers went from spindly little things to fruiting in 2 years or less!

This is because citrus grown from seed have a very long juvenile period...up to ten years or more. Grapefruit (and their hybrids -- like citrumelo) seem to take especially long.

Now if you were able to obtain a grafted hardy citrus (grafted from mature budwood), your hardy citrus should bloom in a year or two just like any other grafted citrus.

    Bookmark   May 15, 2013 at 9:54AM
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crispy_z7(7B-8A)

Just agreeing with Dave in Nova- grafted trees have a "mature" top. Many cold hardy citrus are grown from seed though, so they have to reach maturity the normal way- with time.

I have some grafted satsuma mandarins that fruited at 2 foot tall, and I have a 7 foot tall trifoliate orange grown from seed that still hasn't flowered

    Bookmark   May 15, 2013 at 10:12AM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

Bumping this up, because I want to hear where jacklord is located. I'm in Northern Virginia.

How is that Citrangequat tree doing?? Did you get a grafted tree from Stan?

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 10:45AM
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jacklord(7A)

Dave:

I am across the Potomac in MoCo.

I procured it from Stan, but it is not grafted,

The tree completely defoliated this winter after making a pretty good stand through most of it. However, it has recovered and looks perfectly fine. It has yet to flower this year.

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 2:00PM
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Soulfire

Hey Poncirusguy-

I have a question I'm hoping you can answer. I'm concerned about my trees' abilities to survive the winter, as I do not have very good windows. I bought a growlight with the intention of putting them in my basement, elevating them using styrofoam and putting the lamp on a timer. Can you elaborate a bit on what you do? I have searched for this in the container and citrus forums, but there are so many different things, that it's really hard for me to get actual useable details regarding what kind of growlamp to buy and specific things from knowledgeable people...

This post was edited by Soulfire on Wed, Jun 12, 13 at 14:20

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 2:19PM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

jacklord,

Sounds good! At what temp does it start to show twig damage?

How old is your plant now?

You said you got some fruit from it already??

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 3:16PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

HI

I just noticed that the send email responses was unchecked an I did not get any of the response. I will get back shortly and read and reply in a day

Light setup for small tree click link. my tree is 15 months old, no fruit or flowers

Steve

Here is a link that might be useful: http://s1094.photobucket.com/user/wreristhechimney/slideshow/Bucket%20light%20system

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 10:04PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

growing through winter up north

4)---16 brocoli plant in 1 gal. cans under 8 lights of 650 lumens, Above, Meiwa kumquat tree's roots are warmed by lights to 85 deg


meiwa kumquat tree's roots getting warmth from lights over the Broccoli plants


This shows the Meiwa tree with it's light bucket over it


4 ft by 4ft by 3.5 ft tall adjust to 8 ft tall to acomidat 12 pepper plant in 5 gallon buckets


In side the grow light box. Those pepper plants could be citrus


All scrap material used except screws and light bulbs

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is a link that might be useful: http://s1094.photobucket.com/user/wreristhechimney/slideshow/GROWING%20KUMQUATS%20FROM%20SEED%20TOOLS

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 11:31PM
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Soulfire

Thanks Steve, there's a lot of food for thought there, last question- what is the wattage of the light bulb you use for your kumquat? I recently bought a 400w grow light, I'm trying to figure out if that is enough.

    Bookmark   June 12, 2013 at 11:39PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

I am using 13 Watt CFL's 5300 K . the fact that the trees are totally enclosed and aluminized enables this to work well on such low wattage. The big box I use either 13 or 18 watt CFL's, which ever are on sale at the purchase time. The box is painted gloss white. aluminizing that large of an area with aluminium foil is difficult and gloss white works better on rectangular boxes. As the tree gets bigger I will graduate to trash cans fitted with a 23 watt CFL. I kneed to think what will work best with your 400 then I write back again

Once again my tree will do most of thier growing in the fall - early spring

    Bookmark   June 13, 2013 at 7:47AM
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susanne42(6)

at what temperature and humidity do you grow your trees in winter months steve?

    Bookmark   June 13, 2013 at 9:44AM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

the 5 gallon bucket light with a 13 watt CFL runs at a 20 F warmer than the surrounding air at 2" distance from the bulb... If the top bucket containing the light is used alone, the bottom where the roots are is about 5 F to 10 F warmer than the surrounding temperature. The 2 foot tall box with the broccoli inside with the meiwa tree pot hanging through is about the same except the roots of of the meiwa tree are at a 20 F temperature rise. The enclosure keeps the humidity higher than the rooms. You do have to ventilate it occasionally for insect out breaks an be careful no to splash soil up onto the leave. This can cause fungal problem. Have insecticides an fungicides on hand and be ready. I use soap and water.

have lots of aeration holes in you container

left nagami pot right meiwa pot

This post was edited by poncirusguy on Sat, Jan 31, 15 at 9:07

    Bookmark   June 13, 2013 at 11:45AM
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Soulfire

Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us Steve. Do you think my 400w grow light is good for citrus? I just want to make sure I don't kill my trees.

    Bookmark   June 13, 2013 at 2:26PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

It should work fine. just don't get it to close to the trees. To test a safe difference place a pepper plants at varying distances and see when the deform or burn. I also let tomato plants grow into the bulb to see when damage occurs. properly set up you should be able to grow a lot of garden 'starts' and the savings in store bought plants will pay for the electric

Furthermore if you heat with oil or propane, you can heat with CFL's for about the same costs.

    Bookmark   June 13, 2013 at 4:49PM
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susanne42(6)

thank you steve.
i was thinking to use LED growth light as this will not add any extra heat. the room i'm planning to overwinter my trees will be around 65F to 70F during the day and at night more in the low 60's. if needed can get it a bit warmer. there is an east and south window in the room but because winter days are short i thought i might need extra light.
my collection grew and now have on meyer, two feminello, one tango, one moro, one fukushi kumquat, one key lime and one tangelo. i probably will add a meiwa and a grapfruit somewhere down the future.
i just hope they will all adjust to the same temps and humidity in winter.
i do not use gritty mix for now as i already had a fast draining potting mix. using the wood stick is working great for me. poking in the soil for testing also aerate the roots.
bought neem oil today just to be prepared :)

    Bookmark   June 13, 2013 at 5:27PM
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Soulfire

Thanks Steve!!!

    Bookmark   June 14, 2013 at 11:48AM
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jacklord(7A)

Dave in Nova:

No idea when twig damage begins. I take a sink or swim attitude with it. I reckon it is about 4 years old at this point.

It fruited last year. MIght be strongly related to the warm winter we had.

    Bookmark   June 17, 2013 at 8:48AM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

jacklord

how did the fruit taste.. I've heard what mrtexas thinks

    Bookmark   June 17, 2013 at 12:16PM
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jacklord(7A)

poncirusguy:

I respectfully disagree with Mr Texas when it comes to Thomasville. Tasted like an exotic or different kind of lime to me. I made a pie out of them and the family devoured it within 2 days. Also tried a slice in a gin & tonic and greatly enjoyed it.

Now when it comes to Trifoliate Oranges and Citranges, Mr Texas is probably too kind in his descriptions.

    Bookmark   June 17, 2013 at 4:08PM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

Well, I've eaten a Morton citrange and I was amazed at how good it was. Now the skin you have to avoid, but carefully sqeezed with a bit of sugar and Wow! Now, maybe it was just the perfect year for them, I don't know. They were on a tree in VA Beach.

This post was edited by dave_in_nova on Fri, Jun 21, 13 at 14:41

    Bookmark   June 21, 2013 at 2:40PM
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jacklord(7A)

I ate one in Myrtle Beach and thought it tasted like an orange that had been marinated in sea water. I did not add sugar though.

Generally, these trees are good conversation pieces.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2013 at 1:25PM
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jacklord(7A)

Update:

My Thomasville has set some fruit again. We'll see what happens.

    Bookmark   July 26, 2013 at 5:23PM
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meyermike_1micha(5)

For those of you living in the snowy climates and sub freezing temps.....Do these trees go bare and come back in the spring or are they evergreen?

I wonder if I would be pushing it up here in my zone without protection or if this type of tree would allow me to cover it ?

A citrus tree that would grow here in my zone sounds like a miracle and I would buy one in a heart beat:-)

Thanks

Mike

    Bookmark   July 26, 2013 at 7:32PM
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Scott_6B

Mike, many of the trifoliate hybrids can become semi deciduous in cold climates. I would think that a really good microclimate (unless you are on Cape Cod or the Islands) in MA would be a must. It may be possible to get a Thomasville through the winter outside and unprotected here, but I doubt it would be a happy tree. Frank_zone5.5 has a Thomasville outside, but he provides heavy winter protection. His tree fruits regularly. I also know of a Dunstan citrumelo (which is probably a little more cold hardy than the Thomasville) here in MA. It also has winter protection. I am skeptical that an unprotected hardy citrus could survive winter and be able to mature its fruit sufficiently as to be useable given the comparatively short growing season in New England (this seems to be an often overlooked consideration). If it is unprotected the fruit would need to be harvested before the first hard freeze. Depending on the year and specific location this can happen quite early in MA. Just last year many areas in central and western MA had their first hard freeze in early Oct.

In any case, I think it's pretty amazing that the OP's Thomasville is doing so well in zone 6b! That's absolutely great! However, I would caution going into this expecting to get the same results. The long term survivability of any unprotected poncirus hybrid in an area that sees temps below zero on a regular basis is iffy. Even where I am, which is one of the warmest areas in MA that is not the Cape or Islands sees sub zero temps on average once every 5 years. I have a friend in central MA only ~40 miles from me that saw a low of -15F 2 or 3 winters ago. These temps would have killed any unprotected citrus except for P. trifoliata.

Now having said all of that, I too am curious to see if one of these hardy hybrids can be grown unprotected in a good microclimate here. It certainly does not hurt to try.

-Scott

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 7:17AM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

Jacklord: could you save some seeds for me?? I'm in Northern Virginia.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 9:11AM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

Mike

Your greenhouse should provide a temperature rise to extend your growing season about 1 to 2 month on either side of the growing season. You'll see the biggest advantage in spring with the longer days while it is still very cold as you approach equinox. What I did that will work well for you, is insulate the soil surface and in february i used a hair dryer to blow hot air though pipes going down 3 ft deep in the soil. I used CFL 's to heat the air. my fig tree came out earlier and was bearing fruit by early june. A meiwa kumquat tree would do very well along side of your meyer lemon.to.

To put it outside unprotected would probably kill you tree even if its a PT

If you have a brick house you could plant very close to the south wall but you will still have to lean-too green house it to protect against cold air and wind. You will also loose out on about 7 to 8 hours of the 18 hours of solstice sunlight that would make up for the short growing season.

If you place the tree out in the yard you would need to protect it with a make-shift cover as blinkblogger does on this tread. It is near the bottom. pics of frames then covers

Here is a link that might be useful: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/citrus/msg0122005810811.html

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 9:51AM
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Scott_6B

Poncirus trifoliata can easily survive zone 6 winters. I know of several mature trees in zones 5b to 6b here in New England growing outdoors with no protection.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 10:25AM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

I left 2 of my 4 PT's outside accidentally through a series of 8F nights. The nuclear embryo seedling tree survived with extreme damage. The sexualy fertalized seedling tree died. I have heard from a man down in southern texas the terms horrible when describing the fruits of PT.

My best PT was grow inside during the fall up to winter. AT that time I put it in the basement in front of a window

At 1.5 years I have 10 feet of linear growth on its 3 main trunks and branches. Simply planting one outdoors will take a long time, and I doubt any other citrus hybrid will grow without protection. Much less give you fruit.

On other forums I have heard you state an interest in kumquats. You have connections and know enough to find the 10 degree nameiwa, nippon orangequat ignore indio. Also to get fruit off you meyer lemon you must maintain a minimum temperature of 28F. An owari satsuma does very well down there, and on PT things will go so slow the fruit might last most of the winter where as it must be picked down south 'I am just guess for I don't know enough. I am very new and fairly old to do much experimenting.

Good luck I'm following your progress and readings

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 12:07PM
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Scott_6B

Poncirus, I'm surprised your PT was damaged by 8F, was it dormant? In ground or in a container? They are pretty tough when planted in ground up here, even as relatively small trees. If you have multiple seedlings, why not try planting one?

Here's a current picture of my Flying Dragon, planted in late spring 2010. It has never been protected and has not received any winter damage. The tree has seen a low of 3 or 4F.

It is ~5.5 ft tall with the water sprout on top. When I planted it it was about the same size (or just a little larger than) the PT seedling in the bottom of the picture.

Here's another local PT example growing at the Arnold Arboretum in Boston since 1980. It is probably around 10 ft tall. These trees have seen lows of at least -8F. I know of two other established trees (both Flying Dragon) that have easily seen temps below -10F in the past decade. This picture is from January and it is still holding onto some of its leaves.

Since we're on the subject of edible to semi-edible hardy citrus, here's my Thomasville citrangequat, which is a rooted cutting, that I planted this spring. It will receive significant winter protection, but no supplemental heat, during the winter.

Regarding the taste of PT fruit, personally I do not think the taste is that bad. However, the sticky resin and smell are not so fun. In my opinion, because of the awful smell of the juice, they are really mostly for ornamental value and a seed source for rootstock.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2013 at 6:01PM
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jacklord(7A)

MyerMike:

My Thomasville dropped most of its leaves last Winter, but has bounced back in total. It was a rough Winter followed by a rather cold Spring, which I theorize delayed its recovery. In any case, it is presently a deep, lush green with a few small fruits.

My Citrumelos wilt a bit, but there is no major defoliation. Of course, they are 1/2 Trifoliate while the Thomasville is only 1/3.

I recently added a Morton Citrange and an Ichang Papeda to the Lord Estate. Confidence is high.

dave_in_Nova:

If the fruits survive and become viable, you are welcome to some seeds. Cost you a tour of your garden with a brew.

    Bookmark   July 29, 2013 at 11:07AM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

Gentlemen

Take a nice vacation down to hilton head island, Then on the way home stop by Plantfolks, pick up a 7 gal tree for not bad and bring it back. you should get fruit soon. I believe they graft to PT.

Dave I'd take jacklord up on the offer if iI were you, but still get one tree from plantfolks. The seed grown citrangequat should grow faster and stronger than a grafted tree.

I have decided to end my citrus growing after my trees die, although I hope they live long and prosper but there will be no new trees. My main energy is going to figs and blueberries.

May the growth be with you
Steve

    Bookmark   July 29, 2013 at 11:41AM
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Scott_6B

Poncirusguy,
I'm not sure you are aware, but Beaufort County SC, where Plantfolks is located, is under Quarantine for Citrus Greening. Unless the situation has changed recently, for all practical purposes, inter-state transport (and/or transport to non-quarantine areas) of trees and plant parts from Beaufort county is prohibited.

Here is a link that might be useful: Quarantine order for Citrus Greening

    Bookmark   July 30, 2013 at 9:11AM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

jacklord,

Of course! The yard is always open for tours.

How does a Negra Modelo sound?

I'll be in NC for a week in Sept and have found a grower down there who has a few Thomasvilles. Hope to get one or two.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2013 at 12:23PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

Scot_6B

I was not aware of the quarantine. I had always dreamed of passing through and picking up a bloomsweet grapefruit on own roots or a meiwa kumquat on benton citrange or K x R.

The bloomsweet grapefruit is the only citrus that I will consider giving a try if I could find the fruit for seeds.

Global warming is quit real and I will be able to grow some "good tasting" citrus this far north.

Steve

    Bookmark   July 30, 2013 at 12:51PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

Greeting COLD HARDY CITRUS GROWERS

How have your trees done this winter. As we all know it has been brutal.

Steve

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 11:01AM
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copingwithclay

Steve: All snarkiness excluded, your July 30 2012 assertion that "Global warming is quit(e) real" typed in hot Summer is less objectionable than if typed today, considering the brutal Winter which has set a LOT of modern era records in terms of local snowfall measurements and local low temps, so you were wise not to proclaim the G.W. belief today. That being said, my old Bloomsweet GF have faced 14 degrees and had only partial defoliation from that. They faced 18 degrees and lost almost zero leaves. If you still have an interest in getting seeds, I can ship a ripe fruit to you to both sample and get seeds from. If you like lemon flavored GF, they are good eating.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 1:05PM
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c5tiger

Coping, my citrus faced 14 degrees along with high winds. They had frost cloth and c9 lights and had little to no damage. The wind blew my cloth off the bloomsweet and it took severe damage. All limbs under 1/2" diameter were killed. I grafted a croxton grapefruit on it this summer and it put on 6" of growth. This small croxton graft on my bloomsweet took no damage which surprised me.

How does your bloomsweet compare to grapefruit in terms of cold tolerance?

My new arctic frost satsuma was left unprotected and it was totally defoliated and may have taken more damage, I am still waiting for it to wake up. I thought it would have fared better.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 5:17PM
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tcamp30144(7B N.ATLANTA)

I emailed you i would like a rip fruit to try and try to grow it in ga I with sub of atlanta.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 7:16PM
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copingwithclay

c5tiger: The 3 Bloomsweet GF here are now 20 years old, and they were 17 years past their sell date at Home Depot, (where rookie's like me buy fruit w/o any idea about the importance of WHICH ROOTSTOCK is keeping their tree hopes alive in Winter) when exposed to the 14 degree event w/o any protection. Since the 3 trees never passed 10 ft by 10 ft dimensions, I 'spose that they may be on something other than sour orange. Just wildly guessing. If they were on trifoliate, that would sure help the cold hardiness on old trees. On the other hand, a newly planted Henderson GF on trifoliate sat a few feet away from one of these Bloomsweets during that 14 degree event, and I did quite a bit of work to protect it. Not enough. Dead Henderson. No more gonna do that. Trifoliate was obviously not a magical solution when dealing with a young tree of less than 4 feet. Last Spring I topworked the smallest of the 3 Bloomsweets, using Chandler Red pummelo bark grafts at about 5 feet to 7 feet altitude. The recent 18 degree event caused the unprotected Chandler grafts to defoliate about 70%, but after a few weeks it seems that only a couple slim twigs died back a few inches. New sprouts are now emerging from the Chandlers sitting high up on top of the Bloomsweet branches.I credit the high altitude grafts with imparting greater- than- pummelo cold hardiness from the Bloomsweet branches to the young grafts Just like the Page mandarin grafts done last year at 5 ft to 6 ft on a 6 years old sour orange tree with a 2-1/2" thick trunk. It got pretty good cold protection for the recent 18 degree event, but still lost a few inches at the tops of 3 skinny shoots As opposed to one Page graft done last year on top of a Thomasville Citrangequat old tree at about 8 foot high This grafted scion grew a few leaves last year after the graft took, but did not gain more than a few inches height. When the 18 degrees hit it, it had ZERO protection, but only lost a few of it's 8 to 10 leaves. It is still a beautiful green. I attribute this Page graf't's extra cold hardiness to the old T.C. cold hardiness being imparted to the dinky scion at the high altitude The higher the graft, it seems the more of the r/s's cold hardiness is imparted to the grafted hitchhiker on top..I suppose that your Arctic Frost's publicity/marketing info on the plastic sales tag did NOT have a qualifying statement as to the cold hardiness not being at maximum potential until the tree had grown big over the years. Archie Manning's 2 QB-playing sons did not reach their maximum potential as QB's until way past their high school days.Think biggerer and olderer for your citrus to reach their maximum cold hardiness.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 9:24PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

coping

It sounds like you did overall OK with your citrus trees. I am happy to hear so. I was asked by several citrus'ers to let the global warming article die and I agreed. How ever I did think of reviving it with the entry of "I am really awed at the power of these global warming driven ice storms and record setting cold blizzards we have gotten across the mid west and eastern United states". Oh but I promised to let It die.

I argued with a lot of people that it was unwise to expect citrus of any kind to grow in areas like mine with out an already in place greenhouse for backup for the 1 out of 10 years like this one. My green house will be readily put up and taken down. However I will install it in fall and remove it in spring to get more out of my trees.

It sounds like your living in zone 8a you can succeed with the most cold hardy of tasty citrus and get good fruit. Best of all you can plant stone and pome fruit trees too.

Thanks a lot for the Bloomsweet grapefruit offer. I am no longer looking for any variety of citrus. I have found homes for 1 of 3 poncirus trees. I have found a home for 1 sweetlee tree. The meiwa and nagami kumquat tree will become bonzii bushes with no expectation of fruits. I will keep 1 PT and 2 sweetlee trees as rootstock for meiwa and nagami grafting. The remaining PT will be planted outside and the sweetlee will be grown as a sweetlee.

I have learned so much on this forum that help with other plants that I can say that growing these trees have payed for them selve even if none survive. I have also learned that the only thing harder to grow other than citrus is the PAPAYA tree. don't do it.

Steve

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 10:22PM
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crispy_z7(7B-8A)

This past January I've seen colder temps here than the last 4 or 5 years. Numerous drops to the mid teens (F) and at least one night down to 9F or so.

In the yard my citrangequat (3 years old) completely defoliated, and some "experimental" seed-grown madarin trees also completely defoliated, and lost most small branches.

Inside the greenhouse my Satsuma mandarin trees are undamaged, also I have some potted kumquats, Meyer lemons in the greenhouse that are undamaged. The coldest temp recorded in the greenhouse was about 16F on the coldest night.

I also have some various palm trees that were completely defoliated and spear pull.

    Bookmark   February 24, 2014 at 8:45AM
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c5tiger

Picture of a seedling grapefruit a couple miles from my house after 14 degree weather, 30 years old and 15' or more tall. It defoliated but is flushing back out now.

Our all time record low was 9 degrees in 2001, it probably took a substantial amount of damage but obviously survived.

    Bookmark   February 24, 2014 at 10:13AM
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tantanman(z9Tx)

For the record, Thomasville citrangequat is trifoliate x orange =citrange. Citrange is crossed with a kumquat to give the Thomasville. Other citrangequats exist. Citrangequats are therefore 1/4 trifoliate, but being 1/2 kumquat makes them more cold hardy than some PT hybrids.

One cannot predict how cold hardy PT hybrids will be. I have a cit-triwasha, 3/4 PT, 1/4 mandarin. It partially defolialted in temperatures of 22 to 24. Nearby, a triwasha was undamaged. as well as a Swingle citrumelo. These last two are 1/2 PT.

    Bookmark   February 25, 2014 at 3:29PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

Has any ones 7 a or colder thomasville citrangequat survive the winter of 2013-2014

Steve

    Bookmark   July 9, 2014 at 12:01AM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

Steve, I don't know about citrangequats, but locally here most all the citrumelos and citrandarins died way back to either the ground or to a few feet up the largest trunks. Really a bad winter.

Now I planted a few citrumelos at my office in DC and they don't seem to show any damage. Probably a 7B microclimate there.

    Bookmark   July 9, 2014 at 8:23AM
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tcamp30144(7B N.ATLANTA)

Well just got a Thomasville citrangequat today will plant inthe ground in spring.
Trace

    Bookmark   January 30, 2015 at 11:46PM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

Jacklord, did you end up losing your Citrangequat after winter of 13-14?

Curious.

    Bookmark   January 31, 2015 at 1:20PM
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Steve, Micro (6B ground, 5B roof)

McGarrett

I to am interested in the outcome of your citrangequat

I am also curious of your kumquat tree you started from seed a while back

Trace How is your citrangequat tree doing

    Bookmark   last Friday at 7:30PM
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tcamp30144(7B N.ATLANTA)

Few curled leafs but it doing fine. I have found they are more fussy thank typical citrus but not as fussy as kumquat. My kumquats are the only trees that lost leafs this year and treated them the same.

Thanks Steve

Trace

    Bookmark   last Saturday at 10:12PM
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