forsynthia and gardenia cuttings advice

AshtashAugust 17, 2013

A friend rooted a piece of her forsynthia and put in a pot for me (plant in fore-ground. He's still a little small. How long before I put him in the ground? I also have several gardenia cuttings that I am trying to root. How long before I know if they have rooted or not? Then, how long to ground?
One more question...Full Sun or partial sun best for these plants?
Thanks all, any advice appreciated

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trianglejohn

I like to keep cuttings in pots for at least a year and let them get big - multiple branches, roots growing out the bottom of the pot. If it something that is fast growing I will go ahead and plant it in the ground sooner. Fall is a wonderful time to plant anything that can handle winter.

I usually keep multiple cuttings going just in case something goes wrong - plants can die for a million tiny reasons.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2013 at 9:35AM
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Frances Coffill(7b)

Gardenia Cuttings are VERY easy/quick to start. I have had flowering branches root in a vase in just a few days. The roots formed in water are not very sturdy. It is better to root them in a light medium. (but sand, light garden soil and even commercial potting mix are fine)

2 - 3 weeks is more common. Humidity is very important. My favorite method is in a soiless mix with a soda/juice bottle "cloche" They will lose leaves. Don't panic, just keep the dropped leaves cleared away. and watch for new growth. new leafbuds is usually a good sign that your gardenia is growing roots.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2013 at 11:00AM
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Ashtash

Thanks for the info. As for the gardenia: I took 10-12 random cuttings. Some new growth some hard wood. I planted them together in a large pot and covered in large clear plastic for two weeks. Last night I seperated them to put in their own pots. Only 4 of them had grown roots. One was a hardwood. I put them in their own starter pots and put them back in their little "greenhouse" I also went and got 6 more cuttings to try and root more.The forsynthia was ground rooted by a friend, she sniped it, dug it up and put it in a starter pot. She said I can put it in the ground now but where it is going, it does not have wind shelter, plus It's 6 hrs full sun. I know that will be okay when he's bigger and stronger, but can he stand it now? And if I keep it in pit until next spring, how much direct sun should he receive? Bring him in this winter? And should I go ahead and put him in a bigger pot? He's been in his little starter put for more than a month, maybe 2. Thanks again for any and all responses. I will turn my thumb green eventually! :-) (the pic is the forsynthia)

    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 4:53PM
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Ashtash

Thanks for the info. As for the gardenia: I took 10-12 random cuttings. Some new growth some hard wood. I planted them together in a large pot and covered in large clear plastic for two weeks. Last night I seperated them to put in their own pots. Only 4 of them had grown roots. One was a hardwood. I put them in their own starter pots and put them back in their little "greenhouse" I also went and got 6 more cuttings to try and root more.The forsynthia was ground rooted by a friend, she sniped it, dug it up and put it in a starter pot. She said I can put it in the ground now but where it is going, it does not have wind shelter, plus It's 6 hrs full sun. I know that will be okay when he's bigger and stronger, but can he stand it now? And if I keep it in pit until next spring, how much direct sun should he receive? Bring him in this winter? And should I go ahead and put him in a bigger pot? He's been in his little starter put for more than a month, maybe 2. Thanks again for any and all responses. I will turn my thumb green eventually! :-) (the pic is the forsynthia)

    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 4:54PM
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dottie_in_charlotte(z7-8 NC)

These are easy rooters, no need to fuss to get forsythia to grow. It's deciduous and this baby that is destined for a harsh sun location will probably benefit by removing the 'greenhouse' and letting it get natural air in a dappled shade location.
The movement of this sprig in the breezes (in its pot) will help it develop stronger anchor roots and I suggest in another week or so you transplant it to a much wider pot of similar depth (4-6"deep by 10-12" wide)
This way it spreads roots laterally to begin to create a crown from which it can bush out and broaden.
I don't think you need to baby it so much in October. It needs that sun for as much time as it can get before those leaves drop but morning sun and some afternoon protection
is best for this young cutting. With some sun, those leaves are making food for the developing roots.

I wouldn't plant it until early next spring when its roots are more developed and the new leaves are starting to sprout.
Adapt it gradually to more sun exposure once the leaves are fully out. It will need to harden off
before putting it in its new permanent site and you can probably plant it a touch deeper than what it was in the pot.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2013 at 10:08PM
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coorscat(6 and 9)

I just cut my forsynthia and stick it straight into the ground where I want it to grow. No fuss, no muss, and a high survival rate. That being said, my plants are ultra confused right now. I have trees changing colors because they think it is fall and one of my forsynthias has bloomed because they think it is spring...grrrr

    Bookmark   September 12, 2013 at 6:14PM
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Ashtash

I have somehow managed to keep this forsynthia cutting and 6 gardenia cuttings alive through the winter.
everything I read says to dig the hole twice as big as the root ball but I think that is for pretty well started gardenias right? Mine are still tiny. just a few inches tall. If I want to go ahead and plant a couple outside this spring, how deep and wide? What precautions to protect it. or should I just repot and wait til NEXT spring? same question about the hole with the forsinthia. How is exactly do I "harden them off" between now and spring? Thanks for all your help! :)

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 3:04AM
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Frances Coffill(7b)

Congrats keeping them alive through the winter!

It doesn't really matter if you plant them in the ground this year or not. As long as they have room to grow in the pot and they get enough of what they need they will be fine.

Hardening off, just means to gradually expose them to outdoor conditions (sun, heat, cold, humidity whatever)

Dig a hole twice as "WIDE" not twice as big.

Both of these plants are quite resilient. forsythia especially, The sooner they are planted in the garden, the sooner they will put down roots and establish themselves.

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 5:28AM
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Ashtash

this is one of the gardenias. It looks healthy. (for all I know) The forsinthia is just a brown stick. Is it ok? Do I put the gardenias in the ground at this size or do I put it in a bigger container for the season to grow? please, I need instruction. I so surprised I didn't kill them this winter, Id hate to kill them now. Id like to keep one in a large container on the porch. Do I put it in its big pot now ot gradually go up sizes? thanks for all your help!!
ash

    Bookmark   February 22, 2014 at 6:37PM
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