Weekend Trivia - Sunday

midnightsmum (Z4, ON)August 1, 2010

I should have just posted this last night, but where's the fun in that? You guys would have had it answered by now.

So, we all know that there are many ways to describe the way that leaves and flowers present on stems. Often, this is the way that different cultivars can be distinguished. Here are two:

1. Decussate

2. Distichous

Very similar, yet singular. What do you think??

No clues today, I am off shopping with my cousin and her daughter. Good luck, dear cottagers.

Nancy.

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cyn427(z7aN. VA)

Hmmm...
Well, I certainly wouldn't have it answered yet. I have a thought for #2, but no idea for #1 other than something to do with swearing (cuss?)-snort.

Will have to rely on clues from everyone else...Tm?, Annette?, GG...anyone???

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 12:19PM
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thinman(Z5 MI)

OK, this is nothing but guessing for me, but I'll happily put my ignorance on display for the good of the cause.

We know di means two, so distichous may have something to do with pairs of something, like the needles found on a Scot's (or Scotch) pine.

Decussate is causing no apparent response in my brain cells at this time, so I'll think about it some more.

ThinMan

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 1:07PM
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aftermidnight Zone7b B.C. Canada

1) Fuchsias usually display this trait.
2) If I've got it right most ferns display this trait, not really sure on this one. Sooooo my guess it has to do with the lay of the 'land' LOL.

Annette

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 1:11PM
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cyn427(z7aN. VA)

Well, still no clue for #1, but I was thinking in terms of two for #2 as well. Using Annette's clue, would it be two symmetrical sides-you know, leaves matching up?

Cynthia

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 4:12PM
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midnightsmum (Z4, ON)

Remember, very similar, but singular. So Tm, you are off the mark, slightly. Annette, how could I think I could outsmart you?? Follow Annette, Cyn!!

Nancy.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 5:44PM
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greylady_gardener

I think my brain has turned to mush! I haven't had a clue about either question this weekend. :)
I will sit back and wait for the answer (and an easier question LOL)

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 9:17PM
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cyn427(z7aN. VA)

Okay,"the way they present on stems"+ferns...the fronds have the leaflets (I know that isn't the name of those little things, but can't for the life of me come up with the correct name) across from each other on the stems creating a symmetrical frond. For #1, all I can think is that it must have to do with the flower (Annette's clue of fuchsia). Does it have to do with one set of petals-not the center, but the others? Can you tell I am grasping at straws here????

Cyn

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 11:02PM
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aftermidnight Zone7b B.C. Canada

No, not the flowers :).

Annette

    Bookmark   August 1, 2010 at 11:52PM
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cyn427(z7aN. VA)

Well, I am stumped! DOn't have any fuchsias this year, so I can't go look! Oh well. Can't wait to hear the answers! Thanks for keeping my brain working yesterday-and now this morning, too!

Cynthia

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 10:59AM
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cyn427(z7aN. VA)

Oh, did some research on the Spanish Moss thing. A conservationist named Todd Ballantine formerly from Hilton Head, SC is cited in numerous places as having said that Ford did use the moss in car seats. It was also used in mattresses in the south since the fibers allow the flow of air which made it cooler than other materials. Couldn't confirm the chigger part, although I did find several references to them being found in the moss in trees. Cool story.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 11:21AM
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midnightsmum (Z4, ON)

OK, late start here as it is a Holiday Monday - sorry, again!!

I read about these terms in a recent edition of Canadian Gardening, and then couldn't find the article to save myself!!

Both terms mean opposite:
1. Decussate

Each successive pair is rotated 90° progressing along the stem.

2. Ditichous

Not rotated, but two-ranked (in the same geometric flat-plane) - or as Annette said, "the lay of the 'land'!!

I hadn't heard them before, and wanted to see who the smarties where!!

for Annette!!!

Bonus Round:
for Cyn, who found some info. on the Spanish Moss!!!

Thanks for playing - who's got some ideas for next week??

Nancy.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 12:51PM
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thinman(Z5 MI)

I hadn't heard them before, and wanted to see who the smarties where!!

And you also found out who the smarties WEREN'T. Like me.

Good questions, Nancy. Thanks for coming up with them.

TM

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 2:05PM
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cyn427(z7aN. VA)

Yippee-now we are ALL smarties. Now, how to work this into a casual dinner party conversation..."oh and did you know..." teehee. Great, great questions, Nancy!!!

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 2:20PM
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aftermidnight Zone7b B.C. Canada

I was pretty sure about the first one, the second one was more of a guess for me but thought they both had something to do with way the leaves were positioned on stems. Great question Nancy. I know the meaning of some of these words, my problem is saying them, my tongue gets wrapped up in knots LOL.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 2:48PM
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midnightsmum (Z4, ON)

Hey Annette - thought I'd throw this in just for fun:
 Whorled  three or more leaves attach at each point or node on the stem. As with opposite leaves, successive whorls may or may not be decussate, rotated by half the angle between the leaves in the whorl (i.e., successive whorls of three rotated 60°, whorls of four rotated 45°, etc.). Opposite leaves may appear whorled near the tip of the stem. - this apparently may refer to fuchsias. It's too complicated for me!!

Nancy.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 3:55PM
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aftermidnight Zone7b B.C. Canada

Nancy, when buying fuchsia starts I always look to see if there are 3 leaves instead of 2 at each node, with 3 you get a much fuller plant. I usually pinch when each branch has 2 sets of leaves, that extra node adds up to a lot more flowers. I've only seen a fuchsia with 4 once. I've never paid attention to how these were positioned on the stem though, I'll have to go look.

Annette

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 4:49PM
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