Citrus growing in south Georgia

debbiep_gwSeptember 10, 2005

Hi,I need advice. I live in south Ga. and assume I should be able to grow citrus plants.I bought calomodin(it has small furit on it now)and a Nagami kumquat.We do get temps in the mid to lower 20's.My plan is to plant these in large pots.Do I need to bring them inside or leave them outside?I have a small greenhouse that is not heated I use for tender plants,sometimes I use a heat lamp but never had to use other heat here.Our growing season is long.Most years I can garden from early March until Thanksgiving or after.I'm also sheltered from frost should frost be a problem.Any tips for me?Thanks..Debbie

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MikeP46(Zone 8 La)

Hi Debbie,

Welcome to the obsession, er citrus club. I have around 50 citrus in large pots. Watch your weather channel during the winter for temps dropping below 32. The kumquat and calamondin are very hardy, but prolonged exposure to temps in the 20s can severly damage or kill your trees. Since you only have two plants and plan to put them in pots, bring them in your greenhouse, if temps go below freezing. We have a long growing season in Louisiana, and I rearrange my trees in a temporary shelter around Thanksgiving week, too. I now have a 10 x 20 shade canopy frame to act as a temporary greenhouse during the winter. Lately, our winters have been very mild. If you desire, you can plant them in the ground but be prepared to cover them if you have an arctic blast.

Take care,
Mike

    Bookmark   September 10, 2005 at 9:13PM
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Fish_Man(z9 FL)

If you plant in the ground it would be a good idea to put some microsprinklers on the trees. If done properly you can use them to heat the trees. That is what I use and we have had no problem down to about 18F on some mornings. As long as the water does not quit it is amazing what you can do. Do a search on using microsprinklers for cold protection and you will find good info from The University of Florida.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2005 at 8:59AM
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wilmington_islander(9A/Sunset 28)

Those are both good selections. You may also try many others, including, but not limited to, satsumas, meyer lemons, and various tangerines and a few sweet oranges like Hamlin.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2005 at 9:43PM
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citrusman99(8 SC)

There are many types of citrus that can be grown in ground in zone 8 with just a little winter protection. Ive been growing citrus outdoors for the past 20 years and enjoy the hobby very much. Ive come up with a name for citrus lovers such as myself, its CITRUHOLIC! Beware, once the citrus bug bites you its hard to break away! :) Heres a link with more info on citrus: http//speps.net/

    Bookmark   September 12, 2005 at 1:02PM
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freak65candy(Z8SC)

GO FOR IT!!!PEOPLE DO NOT BELIEVE I HAVE MY POTTED CITRUS WITH MINIMAL HEAT IN WINTER.THEY ARE PROTECTED FROM FROST.I PUT THEM UNDER AN A- FRAME COVERED IN POLY WITH A 250 WATT BULB ONLY WHEN LOW 30'S UPPER 20'S THREATEN.YOU WOULD BE WISE TO LISTEN TO CITRUSMAN99,HE KNOWS HIS STUFF!!!

    Bookmark   September 22, 2005 at 9:47PM
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