how to properly prune Pinus sylvestris

ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5May 23, 2012

first.. take the before pix

note the blue spruce for reference .. for the panorama effect

walk around the other side

never actually saw the house from the front .. at distance

check out the dead one.. one more time

then listen for a chainsaw.. go walk to the neighbors.. find out its a family friend ... ask him how much.. simply to make them fall down the right way ... cringe when he say $400 bucks for 8 .. and then listen to him say .. $200 for the lot.. and he would limb them when they were down ...

and so they go at it ...

run up to the porch to see the evolving view ...

next one

next one

gather up the peanut gallery.. to discuss God knows what .. lol

fallen heroes??/

and the last ones

and a little help for that leaner

and though it is getting dark ...

my new view .. again.. use the blue spruce for panorama ..

i cant find this pic right now .....

and no one called me a drunk

Here is a link that might be useful: and this is how we get rid of it in the country

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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Great choice...

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 4:39PM
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Cher(6 SW OH)

Beautiful view Ken. Now I know where you can put some of your smaller things from the nursery at. :)
Cher

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 5:12PM
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tsugajunkie z5 SE WI

Oh, yeah. Like the iron curtain coming down. I'll bet it's nice to sit and "focus further" now.

tj

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 7:33PM
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j0nd03

Busy day up in Adrian today! Nice new vista :)

John

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 8:01PM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

That sure needed to be done. Your garden seems much larger.
Now you have a 'territorial view', as the real estate agents say.
Mike

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 8:12PM
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dcsteg(5 Shawnee, KS.)

Now Old Blue now gets to hang around forever.

You won't be disappointed.

Dave

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 10:25PM
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sluice

Nice series! The result looks great.

    Bookmark   May 24, 2012 at 9:17AM
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alley_cat_gw

Well done Ken...I can smell the fresh cut pine from here! Cool photos. The spruce is a beauty!

    Bookmark   May 24, 2012 at 10:33AM
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maple_grove_gw

Nice work Ken. This is a good example of what they used to call "creative destruction."

So how long do the carcasses have to dry out before you can set them ablaze?

    Bookmark   May 24, 2012 at 11:21AM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

I live in a temperate rainforest and burn a lot.
I'd start out with the branches of the dead one and add the green branches as soon as a bed of coals develop. The green branches will burn up just fine. No sense in burning it all at once in one big pile.
I usually cut up the branches to get firewood right down to about an inch and a half thick and use the rest for a crude mulch in a out of the way place. The small diameter 'firewood' makes great kindling that I don't have to split. I have also covered the highly textured branch mulch with woodchips to help the decay along rather than burn it.
Mike

    Bookmark   May 24, 2012 at 1:23PM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

Ken, I had one Scot's Pine. It fell apart in a ice storm.
I rarely see one that looks good because of our frequent wet snowfalls and ice storms here in the hills outside Seattle.
Why did you have yours cut?
Mike

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 10:47AM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

Never mind.
It seems Pinus sylvestris doesn't age well. At least, unless it's in the Lakes District in the UK, it just doesn't look good after a few years. Mine fell apart and I see others in my area not looking good too. Not even picturesque.
I like your new view.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 6, 2012 at 5:54AM
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huggorm

They should not be allowed to grow fast. Plant only in poor, dry, sandy soil, or the wood will be soft and weak. But in a proper place they will grow large and straight, ready for timber trade after 80-120 years. In the wild they might live for 800 years ore more, as long as they grow in lousy soil.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2012 at 12:35PM
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brownthumbs789(Z 6b South PA)

Sorry if this is a dumb question - I've so much to learn! But why wouldn't you shred/chip it all and use it all for mulch?

Mary

    Bookmark   November 8, 2012 at 7:15PM
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