are all purslane edible?

preppystudJune 4, 2013

the ones that i buy at mexican stores seem to be big and green, wild purslane seem to have reddish color.

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preppystud

anyone?

    Bookmark   June 7, 2013 at 9:01PM
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preppystud

anyone?

    Bookmark   June 7, 2013 at 9:02PM
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peavey(4b - 5a)

All common purslane is edible, but there are many other purslanes that are not. Moss rose is one, for instance. The common weedy purslane can differ according to where and how it grows. I've never bought it, so I'm not sure about the big, green purslane from Mexican stores, but it's probably been watered, fertilized and cared for otherwise, to grow as large as it can. You can do the same with any that grows wild.

I've seen it with leaves an inch wide alongside irrigation ditches where it gets water as well as fertilizer runoff

    Bookmark   June 9, 2013 at 4:34PM
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zzackey(8b GA)

I bought some edible purslane seeds. I haven't planted any yet. I'd be afraid to eat anything that grows in my yard. Better safe than sorry!

    Bookmark   June 28, 2013 at 1:38AM
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yukkuri_kame(Sunset 19 / USDA 9)

The common wild purslane is perfectly edible, as Peavey mentioned. I am growing 'golden purslane' from a seed company, but I really can't tell the difference between wild varieties. Biggest difference is just water leading to more tender juicy plants.

There are ornamental purslanes, such as those with pink flowers, I'd probably stay away from eating those unless you have other info. But the common weeds, absolutely no worries there.

    Bookmark   July 11, 2013 at 4:25AM
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flowersnow

I have read from many different sources and watched several YouTube videos about purslane. I started eating mine and have really enjoyed it!

    Bookmark   August 2, 2013 at 7:57AM
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yukkuri_kame(Sunset 19 / USDA 9)

When grown in a garden bed and well watered it is an exceptionally productive, tasty and pest-free vegetable.

    Bookmark   August 9, 2013 at 4:02AM
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greenman62

i find the ones growing in my yard (wild) and transplant them, or weed around them, and add to salad.
im not dead yet....
Yep, the wild purslane has much smaller leaves, but perfectly safe

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Purslane just happens to contain alpha-linolenic acid, one of the highly sought-after Omega-3 fatty acids. Why pay money for fish oil when you can grow your own Omega-3 fatty acids as part of your edible landscaping?
http://landscaping.about.com/cs/weedsdiseases/a/purslane.htm

    Bookmark   August 27, 2013 at 2:36PM
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