Thuja GG bad root system

donfordJuly 17, 2008

My wife and I went to a local nyrsery to see if they had any Thuja GG trees and the lady said she would not even order them because they were a soft wood (which I knew) and they had a bad root system.

Can anyone tell me what she was talking about? Do the roots run on top of the ground or what? From photos we have seen of them, they look nice but I don't want to plant them and then find our 10 or 15 years later we made a mistake. Thank you and have a BLESSED evening.

God Bless You

Don

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pineresin

If properly grown, they have a perfectly good root system.

The problem is that many wholesale suppliers keep them for too long in pots that are too small, resulting in potbound plants with coiled roots at the bottom of the pot. Planted out, this makes for unstable trees liable to blow down once they reach any size. I'd guess your local nursery recognises this, and refuses to buy in poor quality stock like this.

Resin

    Bookmark   July 17, 2008 at 7:36PM
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donford

Hi Resin,

I'm just guessing but I was thinking your the owner or moderator of the forum. You seem to be pretty knowledgable about the contents posted and answer pretty quick.

Anyway, what I would like to know is will the TGG fair well in my zone (I'm guessing 7b to 8 about 50 miles west of Fort Worth Texas). I have never seen one up close and wanted to know about how wide they are at the bottom?

I was looking on a web site at either the 8" to 18" (Peat wrapped) or the 18" to 24" (potted). Which would have the best chance for survival here? Thank you for the answer you have already given me and thanks in advance for anything on this question. Have a BLESSED weekend.

God Bless You
Don

    Bookmark   July 18, 2008 at 10:05PM
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pineresin

"I'm just guessing but I was thinking your the owner or moderator of the forum"

Grief, no, just one of the regulars!

TGG might be a bit 'iffy' where you are, a bit hotter and drier than it really likes, but not really sure. How wide at the bottom - with age, probably 10-12m wide, but that'll be in 100-150 years. That's only a guess, as TGG has only been around for about 50 years (it's a hybrid first bred in 1950). If you want something more drought tolerant and not so huge, Arizona Cypress would be a better choice.

Resin

    Bookmark   July 19, 2008 at 5:10AM
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plants77

"Arizona Cypress would be a better choice."

maybe, but subject to the same problem mentioned above about the thuja. They grow very fast and you don't want one that sat around the nursery for a year because it will have major root defects. A bad storm could blow it over in a few years.

Are they commonly planted in that area? They are not as long lived in humid areas as dry ones.

    Bookmark   July 19, 2008 at 12:40PM
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donford

"Are they commonly planted in that area? They are not as long lived in humid areas as dry ones".

I have no idea if there are any of either around here or not. We do get pretty hot here is the summer time. One of the reasons I wanted something fast growing for a privacy tree is my wife and I are 68 years old and wanted something that wouldn't take too long. I'm not really worried about 50 years from now. LOL.

God Bless you
Don

    Bookmark   July 19, 2008 at 2:41PM
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plants77

I bet either the green giant or the arizona cypress would be fine then.

Arizona cypress has green, blue or even gold forms available. Is probably less tolerant of shade. more tolerant of drought.

The thuja can be sheared, while the arizona cypress cannot. Good luck

    Bookmark   July 19, 2008 at 4:07PM
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plants77

RE:I was looking on a web site at either the 8" to 18" (Peat wrapped) or the 18" to 24" (potted). Which would have the best chance for survival here?

thats still pretty small so Id probably get the larger ones, plant them in fall. Try and break up the root ball -spread out the roots a little while planting.

    Bookmark   July 19, 2008 at 4:11PM
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gardener365(5b Illinois USA)

I'd go for the Thuja then. Just be sure to have some jock in the neighborhood dig a hugely-wide hole while breaking up the soil very well. Plant it slightly above the soil surface like this:

Get yourself a 3 or 5 gallon plant for a hole such as that. Heck, you will get super-fast results doing so. A five-footer.

Here's another photo for perspective. Mulch it well keeping the mulch off the trunk backing it off about 2 inches from (the trunk). Water it 2 or 3 times a week or put the hose on the mound and let it slowly soak for an hour once or maybe twice a week.

Next year I'd let the hose soak it for an hour once a week. At night is a good time. Keep this once a week schedule into eternitity and you should have a fairly or the very best chances of overall survival and hopefully excellent results.

Dax

    Bookmark   July 19, 2008 at 10:19PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

What's the purpose of the mound in this last instance?

    Bookmark   July 20, 2008 at 5:26PM
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scotjute

donford,
I'm about 15 miles southwest of Waco and have several Arizona Cypress and Eastern Red Cedar and one Thuja Green Giant. The Thuja is surviving and growing, but it seems to take more water than either the Arizona Cypress or Eastern Red Cedar.
There are several fine specimens of mature Arizona Cypress and Eastern Red Cedar in both Killeen and Waco. Both of these trees will thrive in this area, and should do well where you are. From my observations so far, the Eastern Red Cedar have outgrown the Arizona Cypress.

    Bookmark   July 23, 2008 at 9:40AM
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