Cryptomeria japonica 'Yoshino'

redwingconifer(z5 MI)August 13, 2006

I have seen postings by forum members asking hardiness related questions for Cryptomeria japonica 'Yoshino' and have never been able to contribute a response as I have never seen one until recently. These pics were taken at a Japanese theme garden on the campus of MSU. We are a solid zone 5 and the 2 Yoshinos in the garden look quite healthy at around 30ft tall. I do not know the age of these trees or the ultimate height for this cultivar, but I do believe that the species Cryptomeria can become huge trees.

- here are the pics

1. the tag

2. the tree

3. the trunk(or trunks)

4. the foliage

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pineresin

Pic #3 looks like it might be a cluster of 3 stems regrown from a stump after frost dieback?? - might be worth asking the staff.

As for mature size: very large (40m+). It is a cultivar developed in Japan for forestry plantations; pic at the link below gives an idea of what they can be like (tho' I doubt they'll reach this size in zone 5!).

Resin

Here is a link that might be useful: Forestry in Yoshino (w photo)

    Bookmark   August 13, 2006 at 5:54PM
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pineresin

Of the size of the species:

"One of the most impressive forests in the world is the 250-year old stand of C. japonica at Nikko, where trees attain 65 m in height and up to 2 m in diameter" - Vidakovic 1991, Conifers, cited on the Gymnosperm Database

Resin

Here is a link that might be useful: Gymnosperm Database

    Bookmark   August 13, 2006 at 6:00PM
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kingn8(6a)

Thanks Redwing. I love to see good examples of trees like this. It looks quite happy too, nice shape to it.

Resin might have a good point. These trees can be tough as nails. They remind me of the broom from Fantasia; I have seen them get nipped off by frost only to come back twice as hard and fast the next spring.

Oh, thanks a lot Resin now I have another place added to my 'places to visit' list. Those ancient stands look incredible!

Nate

    Bookmark   August 13, 2006 at 7:57PM
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doniki(z5/6 NE Ohio)

Here's a question for someone, maybe Resin... What types of diseases are cryptomeria prone to... I've never had any winter damage here in z6, but I had terrible luck this summer with randome patches "browning" out... What is that??? It is very disfiguring...

    Bookmark   August 14, 2006 at 9:54AM
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conifers

Not enough water most likely:)

    Bookmark   August 16, 2006 at 10:02AM
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hibiscusfreak

I am considering buying a C.J. 'Yoshino' that I saw at our local nursery. However we get wicked north/west winds on our high altitude property. I think this tree will look gorgeous, but I'm just not sure if it will survive the winds. Does anyone have these planted in a high-wind (unprotected) area, and are they susceptible to branch breakage? We have many douglas firs planted on the west side of our property that have broken branches and are nearly bare on that side due to the winter winds. Any info on your experiences with the Yoshino would be greatly appreciated!

    Bookmark   June 18, 2007 at 11:40AM
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pineresin

It doesn't like exposure very much. Might be worth trying Sequoiadendron giganteum, that stands up to exposure rather better, though in zone 6 you're on the edge of its cold tolerance.

Resin

    Bookmark   June 18, 2007 at 12:47PM
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farslayr

Here's a question for someone, maybe Resin... What types of diseases are cryptomeria prone to... I've never had any winter damage here in z6, but I had terrible luck this summer with randome patches "browning" out... What is that??? It is very disfiguring...

I've got a Elegans with a very minor case of this too..

Leaf blight and leaf spot are two problems. Leaf blight often causes much of the interior foliage to brown, creating an unsightly specimen. Fungicide sprays help prevent the disease, as does placing the tree so it receives early morning sun to dry the foliage. Keep the foliage as dry as possible.

http://hort.ufl.edu/trees/

Here is a link that might be useful: UF Tree facts

    Bookmark   June 18, 2007 at 1:38PM
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hibiscusfreak

Farslayr, interesting info, but are you aware that your reply addressed a question posted nearly a year ago? heehee... It's good to know about the browning out though.

I am not sure of the exact C.J. 'Yoshino' I saw and was planning to purchase, but am pretty sure it is not an Elegans. I hear Elegans stays smaller though. Are they harder to find? I haven't seen any at all.

    Bookmark   June 19, 2007 at 12:50AM
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beng(z6 western MD)

hibiscusfreak, the very few examples of mature Cryptomerias in my z6 area do not look good -- weatherbeaten w/many dead branches. Warmer Wash DC has nice specimens tho.

Two seedlings have perished on my exposed lot.

    Bookmark   June 19, 2007 at 9:16AM
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pineresin

"pretty sure it is not an Elegans. I hear Elegans stays smaller though. Are they harder to find? I haven't seen any at all"

'Elegans' is a juvenile foliage cultivar, with longer (2cm), slenderer, softer leaves; it tends to be less hardy then the type. It usually also stays smaller (though can exceptionally reach 20m or more tall), and tends to have a fairly flexible trunk which slowly bends, forming peculiar shapes. It is readily available in Britain, don't know about the US.

Resin

    Bookmark   June 19, 2007 at 10:15AM
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hibiscusfreak

Awwwww, bummer! I will have to ask at the nursery now to find out which this was. But I did notice they had several different sizes, and even the larger 7' ones were staked! Is that normal for these? I did get the impression that they would bend if not staked, but one nursery worker told me they can be unstaked in a couple years. ?

    Bookmark   June 19, 2007 at 11:51PM
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pineresin

Hi Hibiscus,

They're easy to tell apart: ordinary Cryptomeria, left and centre; 'Elegans' on the right:

Resin

    Bookmark   June 20, 2007 at 5:16AM
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gardengal48

'Elegans', 'Elegans Compacta' and 'Elegans Aurea' are all very common in the milder areas of the west coast, ie. the PNW. Very popular landscape plants here and widely used and planted. It takes a long time for them to achieve significant height - most are rather short, plump dumpling-like trees. One doesn't often see them staked or staked for long, likely as this is not an area noted for high winds. Great foliage texture and rich color, especially in their winter form.

    Bookmark   June 20, 2007 at 9:35AM
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kath068

Are their any more hardy Crypto?

    Bookmark   April 18, 2008 at 8:56PM
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kath068

Were these in a protected sight? I am on top of a mountain that has pretty strong winds in the winter. I'd like to plant these.

    Bookmark   April 18, 2008 at 9:03PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

hey kath ... you know.. bringing up a two year old post.. might not get you a lot of answers ... try starting a new one next time ...

my yoshino ... took 3 years.. but it finally died.. or i got sick of looking at it cuz it was so ugly ... i am aware of no other garden within 200 miles of my house .. that are true zone 5 that grow crypto's .... you will always find one or two.. in z5 who have specific micro climates.. and get away with them ....

zone 5 is conifer heaven ... with a greater range of more plants available to you to plant..

i have no clue why you would try to grow borderline plants ... on top of a mountain .... with high winds ...

they will not take to fast.. cold , winter winds ...

but if you insist .. knock yourself out.. and have fun doing it ...

ken

    Bookmark   April 19, 2008 at 12:07PM
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