Leland cypress death.

newgen(9 Central California)August 15, 2011

A little over a year ago, I planted a row of 7 5-gallon trees next to one another, in order to act as a privacy fence. I planted them 3' apart. They've been growing well, until last month, when 2 of them died. These 2 are not next to each other, and have both turned brown and brittle.

[1] I've read somewhere that Lelands really can't stand hot weather, is that true? Summer here is in the high 90s with some days in the low 100s, hot and dry.

[2] Does the planting distance have anything to do with this?

[3] Once the branches and leaves turn brown and brittle, is this irreversible, as in 100% dead?

[4] Watering is 2-3 times a week.

I'm wondering why only 2 of them died.

Thanks,

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pineresin

Leyland Cypress can take hot weather, but only in a limited way - it leaves them highly susceptible to Seiridium cardinale canker disease, and they rarely survive more than 10 years or so in central California. Possible the plants may have become infected at the nursery, or soon after delivery.

You'd do better to use one of the California native cypresses, such as Sargent Cypress, which is more resistant to Seiridium canker.

Resin

PS Leyland

    Bookmark   August 15, 2011 at 7:06PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

Thank you for the info, I'd better get rid of the 2 dead ones before others are infected.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 1:52AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

Upon closer inspection, other trees are infected as well, but they're are still green. Is there ANYTHING I can do to save those remaining trees? I'm not sure if the fungus is the same type that you said, please see the photos. Thanks,


    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 12:13PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
scotjute

Removing the dead would be a good idea. My wife has a row of them planted at 6' apart. Within 4 years they had completely closed this gap, that is also about the time the bagworms started. 6' was way too close together. 12' would be a better distance. These trees seem to be either growing or dieing and are high maintenance trees. I am currently climbing ladders to remove bagworm/remove dead limbs/etc and their drought resistance appears to be nominal. Eventually they will get too tall or I will be too old. I have reached the point where I prefer low maintenance trees, which sends one back to more native varieties as suggested above. Drought resistant/low maintenance Arizona Cypress or Eastern Red Cedar have worked well here in Tx. In California, you have several native conifers to choose from. Good luck.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 12:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pineresin

I'd strongly suspect the disease is far enough progressed that they were infected before they left the nursery. Try to see if you can get a reclaim on them.

Resin

    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 6:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wassercom(5a)

Not my area of expertise, but those sure look like mealybugs to me (you can see their ovoid shapes and antennae in a few spots). Once established, I think they are very hard to get rid of...

    Bookmark   August 17, 2011 at 12:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shastensis

I would suggest ridding yourself of them and planting one of the native species of California Cypress that are adapted to hot and dry climates such as Tecate Cypress, Sargent Cypress, Macnab Cypress, or Cuyamaca Cypress. Tecate is probably the fastest growing and can be purchased from Las Pilitas Nursery via mailorder, or as seedlings from University of Idaho Nursery at 2 dollars each. Call Annette at 1-208-885-3888

    Bookmark   August 17, 2011 at 3:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

OK I'm in the process of removing the 2 dead Lelands. Are you guys saying that the remaining 5 trees, that have the white infection on the trunks and branches, are beyond saving, even though they're still green? I will remove them all if this is the case. I just want to find out if I can scrape the white stuff off the 5 green trees and use some fungicide, will allow them to recover.

Thanks,

    Bookmark   August 17, 2011 at 6:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
scotjute

newgen,
I'm not an expert but from what I've seen and read, the Leylands appear to be a high maintenance species in many parts of this country. Even if you had success this year, the same or other problems will likely show up next year, and the year after, and so on.
That said you already have the trees planted and its not a good time right now to plant other trees, why not experiment a little and see if you can perhaps save them for a while.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2011 at 9:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

scotjute: That's exactly what I'm thinking. Avoid having to dig up 5 other trees,when there's a small chance they can survive for a while more (even a few months is worth it to me). This gives me time to research for their replacement (I may go with something else entirely) and tend to the rest of my yard. Also like you said, it's too hot to be digging and planting. Thanks,

    Bookmark   August 18, 2011 at 12:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

The white stuff on my trees don't look too much like the photos here: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr341

So maybe it's not Seiridium cardinale. The white stuff feels mushy, kinda like mealybugs, like wassercom posted above, and there are ants all over them.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2011 at 7:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wassercom(5a)

If you look at the big mass of white stuff in your first pic, at the 10 O'Clock position, you can see one of them crawling away.

I've had them with indoor tropicals before; they're pernicious.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2011 at 11:05PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

I got rid of the 2 dead trees. I crushed and wiped off as much as I could those white masses of mealybugs on the other 5 trees. Tomorrow I will do this: http://www.ehow.com/how_5075401_kill-mealybugs.html

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 12:43AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
newgen(9 Central California)

Update: I mixed full strength rubbing alcohol with a good amount of dishwashing soap, sprayed all over the mealybugs colonies, I immediately saw them shriveling up and died. As of now, there are no more of these nasty bugs on my remaining 5 trees. My last spray was over 2 weeks ago. All branches are healthy now.

    Bookmark   September 6, 2011 at 6:17PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Some conifers I grafted.
Conifers I grafted this winter are starting to push....
maple_grove_gw
Test
Test
bamboo_nuts
deer and conifers
Momma deer and twins have taken residence in the yard....
zephyrgal
What are these trees?
What are these two conifers? One is blue/gray with...
edlincoln
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™