Z5 Hardy Cedrus libani from Indiana Available

picea(6A Cinci- Oh)September 23, 2008

Forest Farm is offering tubes of Cedrus Libani 'Eugene' that they state it is zone 5 hardy from a tree in Central Indiana. I questioned their information and tracted down the owner of the original tree who confirmed that the tree was extremely hardy.

Year ago he had purchased lots of seed and this was the only seedlling that survived. If fact he said he had a Stenacoma and this seedling and moved them at the same time before a hard winter and this one survived and the Stenacoma died. On the recommendation of Don Howse he also placed the tree in the most exposed location he had on his property and the tree did fine.

Base on my conversation with Eugene the tree must be as Hardy as the ones at Purdue University or even more so.

I was told the tree is green and full with a softer form than stenacoma.

If you like cedrus and are looking for cold hardy forms this sounds like one worth trying.

David

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dansgrdn

Thanks for the info David. I appreciate you sharing it with us. Always looking for new conifers that may be Zone 5 hardy. Thanks again, Dan

    Bookmark   September 23, 2008 at 11:54PM
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gardener365(5b Illinois USA)

It was bound to happen sometime.

Wonderful news!

Dax

    Bookmark   September 24, 2008 at 8:57AM
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prostrata

thanks for posting this! Does anyone know what town in central Indiana this was grown, I would like to look up climate information for the area. -Jon

    Bookmark   September 24, 2008 at 1:40PM
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picea(6A Cinci- Oh)

The town is Greensburg, about half way between Cincinnati and Indy on I-74. The land is very flat there so I would asume it is windy in exposed areas, much more than here in Cincinnati. When I talked to Eugene he also said the tree over wintered outside in a wheel Barrel one year as he forgot to plant it. Thats what makes me think this may be extremely hardy.

David

    Bookmark   September 24, 2008 at 2:47PM
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prostrata

Here is what 'Eugene" looks like:

I'll be curious how this tree performs in zone 5a Penn.
-Jon

    Bookmark   October 3, 2008 at 10:57AM
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prostrata

well, here is what "Eugene" looks like after a harsh zone 5a winter:

I think it made it through pretty well...

    Bookmark   March 16, 2009 at 4:30PM
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billb(Zn5 OH)

I know that there are a few that are trying to graft/root the Purdue Cedrus under the name 'Purdue Hardy'. I know a few are around but probably not enough to distribute yet. I grafted a few this year, but only enough to evaluate in Northern Ohio. I've not seen the tree, but I hear that it is a fairly old specimen and has never burned.

    Bookmark   March 16, 2009 at 4:47PM
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pineresin

Hope it survives, but a little early to tell for sure yet. Two additional risks / possibilities: (1) that the bark has been killed as well as the needles, (2) that the roots were killed (particularly a risk if it is grafted onto a less hardy rootstock). You won't know for certain until well into the summer.

Resin

    Bookmark   March 16, 2009 at 5:50PM
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tsugajunkie z5 SE WI

Thanks, prostrata, for the update. Let us know how things come out.

You may want to remove that original packing tape stapled tight to the stake and replace it with something a bit looser.

tj

    Bookmark   March 17, 2009 at 7:16PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Also pull the chips away from the stem.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2009 at 2:21AM
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gardener365(5b Illinois USA)

Looks pretty good.

Dax

    Bookmark   March 18, 2009 at 6:57AM
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livingfossil(6a Dayton OH)

Thanks for the info and updates! I have a Cedrus deodara Snow Sprite on a south wall. It had just some minor burn on the end needles, but it looked pretty good. This is its second winter. Last summer, i bought a Cedrus deodara from Home Depot. It is planted sort of in a protected spot. It has a lot more winter burn on top, but it may pull through. I can't wait til more winter hardy cedars become more available. Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati has several very large Stenocomas. In the hurricane winds we got last year, a few got damaged though.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2009 at 2:56PM
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picea(6A Cinci- Oh)

Livingfossil and prostrata how cold did it get in your locations? I know Dawes arboretum got down to -19f and they have several stenacomas. I also know a collector in Zanesville that has Karl Fuchs. I'll check with both to see how their plants came through this winter.

From what I have been told Cincinnati got down to around
-10F. I also have a kaki persimmon that look OK and 3 small southern magnolias planted in late fall that seem to have made it. I think that fact that it gradually got colder this year helps a lot.

David

    Bookmark   March 18, 2009 at 8:27PM
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livingfossil(6a Dayton OH)

Picea, those lows sound about right for South Dayton. I think we have a few cold days in January. I took a look again at my Snow Sprite, and only a few of the very tips were burned. The Snow Sprite is sheltered by a south wall, a fence, and a Tsuga.

I know that the unnamed Cedrus I got from Home Depot was a gamble. I am not sure they should be selling those in Dayton, but I kept the receipt and it is guaranteed for one year or my money back. Before winter, I wonder if I should buy a spray and perhaps build a burlap wall for it during the winter.

Do you have several cedars yourself? I collected some seed from the stenocomas from Spring Grove, but they never germinated.

I know that my Modoc Cypress never gets winter burn and after I think 5 years, it is still going strong.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2009 at 10:45PM
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prostrata

picea- i believe it got down to -15 in my location, but it was just a generally severe winter here, i believe there was a stretch where the lows were consistently below 0, and scorching winds pretty much the entire winter. This is my 7th winter here, and it was the worst winter to date, as far as temps go.

does anyone know what forestfarm uses for a rootstock for Eugene?

    Bookmark   March 19, 2009 at 8:22AM
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picea(6A Cinci- Oh)

Prostrata-I am almost 100 percent sure Forest farm uses deodara seedlings. Bob Fincham, who all would agree is an expert, has state it is the best understock and is hardy as an understock. If you are looking for other cedars to try look for Eisregen. There is a collector I talked to in Indianapolis who told me it was his hardiest true cedar and he also has Stenacoma.

From what you have said about you weather the wind is most likely more of a problem than the cold. You may want to spray the young cedars with Wilt-pruf for several years until they become more established.

Livingfossil-I have Karl Fuchs that I got as a 6' BB 3 years ago. It had grown well and is about 10' now. The needles at the top look a little discolored but I think it will be OK. I also planted a 6'BB at my neighbors house this summer and it to looks fine. One of my other neighbors planted a weeping blue cedar that he got from Lowes or HD and it seems to have done fine also.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2009 at 10:24AM
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gardener365(5b Illinois USA)

Glad your guys plants are doing well. -10 or -19 for a bad winter isn't anything... you should be fine growing those.

For your interest a short list of the hardiest ones I know of:

HARDIEST FORMS: Cedrus deodara: 'Eisregen', 'Eiswinter', 'Karl Fuchs', 'Kashmir', 'Polar Winter', and 'Shalimar'

And a short-list of the Chamaecyparis lawsoniana that too are considered hardier:
I can attest that 'Van Pelt's Blue' (Arrowhead Nursery) does extremely well in serious cold winters (-30 etc and colder) on the exposed flatland prairies of the upper midwest. A friend has several he keeps rooting and planting and they all have zero winter injury after at least 5 years running.

'Dik's Weeping'
'Van Pelt's Blue'
'Rijnhof'
'Sullivan'

Then of course for a no-brainer and I still need one myself:
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Mr. Green Genes'

Dax

    Bookmark   March 19, 2009 at 11:01AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

prostrata, did your little Cedrus make it?

    Bookmark   July 25, 2012 at 5:52PM
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coniferjoy(z7 The Netherlands)

I think Prostrata isn't a member no longer, I didn't came across this name for the last couple of years.
The same is for Picea and Livingfossil.
May be they're silent members now...

    Bookmark   July 26, 2012 at 1:22AM
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