Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

nutsaboutflowers(2b/3a)July 27, 2011

twrosz mentioned chip budding in another post, so I looked it up on YouTube because I didn't know what it was. I'm still not exactly sure what it is.

However, is it as easy as they make it look?

One woman also used honey when grafting a stem from a rose onto another rose bush. Really? That easy? Can't be......

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beegood_gw

I'm sure Konrad can give you some great help with this. By the looks of his friut trees he does all kinds of grafting.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2011 at 9:14AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Yes, it's very easy, you can do it now with new wood/bud.
I would do it if I had allot of time on hand right now but I don't.

My preferred grafting is bark grafting, [scion in spring]

Here is a link that might be useful: Bark Grafting

    Bookmark   July 27, 2011 at 8:42PM
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nutsaboutflowers(2b/3a)

Awesome link Konrad. As usual, your pictures tell a thousand words. They kinda make a person want to give it a try =:) Thank you.

Have you ever heard of anyone using honey for grafting rose bushes?

I believe you generally stick to fruit trees, but I'm wondering if you, or anyone you know, has ever used it?

    Bookmark   July 27, 2011 at 9:36PM
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nutsaboutflowers(2b/3a)

Konrad, I forgot to ask.

Why do you use two different types of tape on the same graft? Electrical tape is easy to get but is the second tape you use breathable? It looks like it is.

I saw use of breathable tape on YouTube. Is it necessary?

    Bookmark   July 27, 2011 at 9:52PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you ..
I've never heard of honey...it might do the same thing as the sealant I use?

The electrical tape is to hold tight the chip/bud or scion, the other tape, [parafilm] is to prevent from drying out the bud or scion and you can just leave it on, new growth will push through it and will fall off by itself.

Here is a picture of 2 chip graft's done in spring, sweet cherry onto pincherry roots stock, [grown out] you can do the same with roses but just slightly below ground.
On the bottom graft I didn't put a tape on top and the chip slightly lifted on me...then I sealed it up a bit.

    Bookmark   July 28, 2011 at 2:57AM
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sengyan

Chip budding is not difficult. I first learned Cleft grafting. Then Konrad taught me Bark grafting which I mastered. Now I do both Chip budding and 'T' budding. 'T' budding is similar to Konrad's bark grafting. The 2 differences are that (1) for Bark grafting you have to cut of a branch whereas in 'T' budding you do not have to. (2) You use a 2-3 buds scion in Bark grafting but you only use 1 bud in 'T' budding. The similarity is that you have to slip the bark and place the scion wood or bud under and then bind up. With Chip budding you have to be very careful to match the cambium of the bud to that of the rootstock. If you match well and the bud is good you have a take/success. If you are in Edmonton it would be a pleasure for me to show you.
Sengyan

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 5:37PM
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nutsaboutflowers(2b/3a)

Thank you sengyan for the gracious offer, but I'm far far away in Saskatchewan.

When I get some time I think I'll try one or two of these methods. It looks really rewarding.

Thank you both for the information =:)

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 6:55PM
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freezengirl(3aMN and 5AK)

Now you have opened up a whole new world of gardening for yourself. :-) It is just as addictive as straight gardening.

    Bookmark   July 31, 2011 at 10:14PM
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twrosz

Yes, chip budding is very easy and has a high rate of success. Here's a bud about one month after being inserted. I had used painters green masking tape to securely hold the bud in place and keep in moisture, I like this tape because it is not too sticky and comes off easy when removed. I have not always been the most successful with other forms of grafting, I guess I'm just not good enough at it, lol.

    Bookmark   August 11, 2011 at 12:00PM
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nutsaboutflowers(2b/3a)

Oh, everyone here makes me want to try this out.

I sure wish I had gotten some good $5.00 buys on a few roses, as I would love to try to get two different colors on a rose bush.

twrosz - what did you "sprout" and what did you graft it onto?

    Bookmark   August 11, 2011 at 2:10PM
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twrosz

The "sprout" is 'Royal Red' Norway maple, this has been chip budded upon rootstock of a few Norway maple seedlings that appeared next to the mother trees I planted a few years ago, these seedlings had regular green foliage.

    Bookmark   August 11, 2011 at 4:24PM
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