Lets talk about Plum

Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)August 17, 2006

The other day have picked some of the sprouts sunshine plum, [my first larger crop] as soon as you would touch them they would fall off!...that means they are ready to pick but really not very good to eat!

It seems, you have to keep them a while for them to get softer, then they are fairly good and more juicy!

Anybody tasted these?

Konrad

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cailinriley(z3 Calgary AB)

Looks like a bumper crop, Konrad! My neighbour has a plum tree (don't know what kind, but the plums are the same colour as those in your photo), and I'm lucky enough to have some of the branches hanging into my yard! I don't know about having to leave the fruit--as soon as they're ripe, they drop onto my lawn and, if they're not badly bruised or stepped on, I wash and eat them. The skin is a bit tart, but the rest is very sweet and juicy. There's just a little stone in the centre. I enjoy them more than my neighbour, I think!

I don't know how much longer the tree will survive, though. The previous neighbour did an annual "pruning" with a chainsaw, and half the tree is dead. This neighbour, who has more respect for plants, has been next door for 4 or 5 years, but he's just sold the house. I hope the new owners take care of this poor tree. There aren't many of them in Calgary! I don't know if it can be revived--most of the living branches are on my side of the fence. :-(

Enjoy yours!!

    Bookmark   August 17, 2006 at 6:36PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you cailinriley!
Hope you can enjoy your neighbors plums for many more years. A good plum is something nice! I'm not sure exactly what species it is. You're right about not too many good ones are around anymore, especially old surviving species, some have been brought over from the old country many years ago.
It would be good, some of these are being revived again from other growers.

This Fofonoff Plum [from Terry]....thank you!
Have grafted last year I think and this year could taste already.
Very nice!.....almost totally free stone!
Konrad

    Bookmark   August 20, 2006 at 1:22AM
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glen3a(Winnipeg MB 3A)

Hi there,

Since the topic is "plums", I am taking this opportunity to ask a few questions that I have always wondered...

First, my experience growing plums is limited, we had a tree of "Pembina" plum by the garage when I was a kid. I vaguely remember the plums. I remember birds would peck them too. Anyways,

I assume that a plum needs another plum tree to cross polinate with, correct? If so, is there such a thing as a plum tree with multiple varieties grafted onto one? I know they have apple trees such as that.

Any thing such as a tall narrow columnar shaped plum tree, one that's not too wide? Or, alternately, perhaps one that can be kept more "shrub like" than a tree?

Just curious, I have always wanted to grow plums, but haven't been able to due to lack of room.

Regards,
Glen

    Bookmark   August 21, 2006 at 3:09PM
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cailinriley(z3 Calgary AB)

Hi, Glen. As far as I know, the neighbour's plum tree is the only one in the area. My understanding is that the tree will fruit as long as there are other "prunus" family members in flower at the same time. In my yard, and in the other neighbours', there are Nanking Cherries, flowering almonds, chokecherries and purple sandcherries.

The only difficulty with getting fruit on the plum tree is that it's one of the first to bloom in spring, so sometimes a late frost will kill off the flowers.

The tree next door is not large, at all--about the size of a mature lilac. The current neighbour has not pruned it, as far as I know. The previous owner regularly hacked at it with a chain-saw. (He also shortened branches of my mountain ash, that were hanging over his side of the fence. Grrrrr. I was able to repair the damage. He butchered all the beautiful, mature trees on his property...that's OT, but I still seethe when I think of it. He couldn't understand why I preferred to use my pruning saw after he offered to lend me his chain-saw. Grrrrr.) The owners, prior to the hacker, carefully pruned the tree, after it flowered, to keep it small and bushy. If only they hadn't moved away...

    Bookmark   August 21, 2006 at 4:48PM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Konrad,

A number of years ago my italian neighbor gave me two prune plum suckers and has bear fruits for a few years now. Last year one of my tree didn't produce any fruits on one side of the same tree. Why?? I have yet to figure that out. This year it is bearing fruits. It is quite sweet for eating and good for jam too which I mix it with my sour cherry. As far as I was told you will require two prune plum tree for it to produce fruits (cross pollination). Maybe in a few years I might have more suckers to give away. Hands up! I am siutated in Edmonton area.

venuscat

    Bookmark   August 22, 2006 at 12:38PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Hi Glen
You'r right, most plum need another plum to polinate with.
Others in the prunus family can work, the problem is flowering time and overlap. The Nanking I believe can work.
I have never seen plums sold in multy grafts, this is something you might be able to do yourselfs after you planted a tree.
Have one tree with about 5 veriaties, some are self fruitful and have plums growing ever year now.
I wouldn't worry about plum tree getting too big, they tend to bee much smaller then apple trees.

venuscat
Most likely your Italian neighbor has grafted the suckers before he gave them to you. I have done the same with my neighbors suckers growing on my side.
It could be a seedling, if so, I sure would be delighted to except your gift!

>>As far as I was told you will require two prune plum tree for it to produce fruits (cross pollination

Most European Prunes and Plums are self fruitful and don't need another tree, most Japaneese plum, [what are primarly sold here] need a cross polinator.

Konrad

    Bookmark   August 23, 2006 at 1:09AM
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twrosz

konrad, the 'Sprouts Sunshine' I had grafted (from you) has grown very well and I look forward to the tree coming into production!

Fofonoff has fruited very quickly for you! Yes, it was only last spring that you had grafted it. I can't guarantee this being true to name, but whatever it is, it sure tastes GOOD!

Terry

    Bookmark   August 23, 2006 at 1:31AM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Konrad,

It is a sucker from her matured tree. I have given to two of my sisters and hers are growing well. I have some suckers now but they have been spoken now. I haven't dig them yet maybe might have extra. I will let you know.

Konrad,

Do you have any scion wood so I can graft to my plum tree? Maybe a pembina, will that work?

Terry,

Could you tell me if it will work for me to graft fofonoff plum tree to my black prune plum tree? How long does it takes? Is it better to do it in spring?

Cheers.

venuscat

    Bookmark   August 23, 2006 at 12:56PM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Konrad,

It is a sucker from her matured tree. I have given to two of my sisters and hers are growing well. I have some suckers now but they have been spoken now. I haven't dig them yet maybe might have extra. I will let you know.

Konrad,

Do you have any scion wood so I can graft to my plum tree? Maybe a pembina, will that work?

Terry,

Could you tell me if it will work for me to graft fofonoff plum tree to my black prune plum tree? How long does it takes? Is it better to do it in spring?

Cheers.

venuscat

    Bookmark   August 23, 2006 at 1:02PM
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twrosz

venuscat, yes it would be fine to graft the Fofonoff plum onto your tree. Unfortunately, I have but only a few rather small grafts of it on my 'Pembina' plum tree. I was actually doing some chip budding today, a method said to be good for plums at this time of the year. I will check again if there is any desirable scion wood I could send you for spring. Have you ever attempted grafting? As shown by Konrad, fruiting can occur the very next year!

Konrad, do you practice budding at this time? ... chip budding? I hope my attempt at chip budding will be successful, as regular budding with plums is sometimes a bit difficult when the bark does not properly lift.

Terry

    Bookmark   August 23, 2006 at 9:47PM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Terry,

I have tried grafting apples from my neighbor's tree but failed on two attempts. I did a quick basic grafting course at Devonian but so far in vain. I will be delighted to have your scion wood comes spring. :) Maybe this time I will be successful.

venuscat

    Bookmark   August 24, 2006 at 11:34AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

venuscat,
Can you post a picture of that prune?
Sounds interesting......[your plum sucker]...I'll have some plum
scion we can trade with. You can graft any plum to plum including
apricot.

>>Konrad, do you practice budding at this time? ... chip budding? I hope my attempt at chip budding will be successful, as regular budding with plums is sometimes a bit difficult when the bark does not properly lift.

My favored is bark grafting, have done ones chip budding late summer, I think it was too late in the season, all have failed. But two times have done in the spring, same technique and all buts have taken.

Here a sweet cherry chip graft this spring.[two budds on one stem]
Konrad

    Bookmark   August 25, 2006 at 1:29AM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Konrad,

We can trade and I will have to try chip budding too. Did you use electrical tape to bind the bud? I went around to get some budding tape but could not find one except grafting wax and pruning paint.

I don't know how to paste pictures here yet. I can paste in my blog for you if you like. If you show me to paste it here I will definitely try to paste it here.

venuscat

    Bookmark   August 26, 2006 at 2:53AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you venuscat for emailing your plum pic.! [very nice]

First thing I have done, downsized it from 2.5MB to about 130KB ....good for emailing.
This is the very first step I found works good before uploading to what I use is photobucket album, then it's easy, just a matter of copy and paste.

Hope you don't mind, I posted it for you!

This plum, called MT. Royal , 99.9 % sure, have it too, grafted, [ate some today], but not on it's own root. I know this from another grower and this is the only plum I know of can be grown on its own root.
I'm still very interested to get a sucker from it!

>>Did you use electrical tape to bind the bud

Yes, also when bark grafting.
Konrad

    Bookmark   August 30, 2006 at 2:52AM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

konrad,

Oh thank you very much for posting my pic! :) Maybe next year I might have small suckers. I saw a few growing around my tree. I will email you if you don't mind them small like pencil or middle finger thin and about 2-3 feet tall. It takes 3-5 years to produce fruits. The fruits are quite sweet when they are ready. i will let you know comes spring.

venuscat

    Bookmark   August 30, 2006 at 11:01PM
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twrosz

konrad, thanks for showing your chip budded cherry. I just checked on the chip budding I had done a week ago, of course too early to tell, though buds are still looking nice and plump. With more good weather coming up, maybe they will heal in before too long, I hope!

venuscat, I bet that MT. Royal plum of yours tastes real GOOD! I can send you the Fofonoff scions early next spring. The wood I have available is rather fine, but is easily worked with when one chip buds.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2006 at 11:46PM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Terry,

Thanks I will be looking forward to learning more from you comes spring. I love to try my hands on grafting again. Yes the fruits are quite sweet but beware dont go too, too far from home you might need your toilet :P Good for someone who is constipating lol We do eat them and some I turned them into jam after I finished making my sour cherry vodka liqueur.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2006 at 1:57AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you Venuscat,....sounds good!

This one, Supreme Plum [on the picnic table], picked some the other day, 25 year old tree not loaded, that's why they grew huge!
The fruit is very tasty!....skin is slightly bitter.

This one could use a I.D.
The tree was put in about 12 years ago and produced first time! As I remember, some kind of Siberian apricot?
The fruit is dry like apricot, not really my favored to eat out of hand, think would be nice in pie.

This Prune, top graft, has produced first time in about 8 years. Just excellent fresh eating, also nice for pie and dehydrating, like MT. Royal plum.
The grower from where I got the scion wood from named it "Empire"
Konrad

    Bookmark   September 3, 2006 at 1:53AM
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twrosz

Konrad, those large blue plums are totally AMAZING! ... though, it has not produced much over the years, due to weather? What stock tree do you have it and others grafted upon?

I just again checked on my chip budding and all is nicely callusing in! ... I'm happy about that because I was beginning to feel like a failure due to my poor grafting takes. I will use this method much more in the future, chip budding is very simple and quick!

venuscat, you should practice some chip budding, so as you will be successful with the 'Fofonoff' I send next spring. The scion wood I have available is kinda small, and this is likely the best way to work with it. By the way, I can eat in large amounts just about any fruit without it giving me even the slightest stomach ache or worse!

    Bookmark   September 3, 2006 at 4:59PM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Konrad,

What beautiful looking fruits you have!! They are more oval shaped. How do you dehydrate your prune plum?

Terry,
You are one of the few i know who doesn't get tummy ache. I do somehow envy you people for that. :P I will definitely try to do chip budding comes spring. I don't mind it small cause I don't have really strong fingers if there are too thick I might have problems.

venuscat

    Bookmark   September 11, 2006 at 5:47PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you all!

>>What stock tree do you have it and others grafted upon?

I graft on anything I can get my hands on, really don't know the root stock, some are grafted onto bought trees, [top graft] some to grown seedlings from previous plum seeds.

>> They are more oval shaped. How do you dehydrate your prune plum?

The oval shaped ones are the "true" prune plums, shaped to a point on both sides, free stone and flesh is firm, juice not running out like a plum, that makes it an excellent dehydrating plum. I never really had enough of them that I had to dehydrate, usually eat them fresh. I'm like Terry, I can eat allot of them and it doesn't bother me.

In Switzerland where I grew up, we cut into the center of the plum, then flip it over [the two half's stay together], take the stone out and dehydrate them by a commercial plant.

Here, I would do it in a small home dehydrator, we have one, so far have used it for apples and pears.

Konrad

    Bookmark   September 12, 2006 at 1:21AM
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venuscat(3a CANADA)

Cheers for the info. I will try dehydrating some next year as i have given most of my fruits away and some I make Jam jelly.

konrad, amazing prune plums! :P

venuscat

    Bookmark   September 19, 2006 at 8:47PM
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murray2paddles

Hello everyone. I have just found this site today and feel I have finally found help ! I am attempting to do bud grafting. I have started out practising on some lilacs and some of the buds are doing ok,"I think". Now it is time to do my plums, but all the info I read says, "do my T cut through the bark but not into the wood". That is easy to understand but now I am wondering if cutting through the bark means just that and stopping before the cambium..... or do you go through both bark and cambium then stop when you reach the wood ? I was going to do it both ways just to cover myself then realized it was much smarter to just ask. So please, what do I do ?

    Bookmark   August 14, 2007 at 8:05PM
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seekingtruth

Hi, Perhaps you could help me to identify my very large plum tree. We were told the tree was a Siberian Plum when we purchased our property. I have researched and have not found a Siberian Plum..except for one supposedly found by scientists that was 90' tall,frozen with leaves & fruit attached, north of the artic circle! Our tree is about 70' tall, has large leaves which shed 365 days per year, and bears many small, oval shaped, dark purple, slightly bitter fruits once a year. We do know that the tree is not native to Florida, and if it is some type of plum tree, it obviously doesn't require a dormant period. Thanks for any help of info you can provide to help us identify our plum tree! :)

    Bookmark   August 17, 2007 at 1:21PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you venuscat!

Murray, just cut through the bark and when your knife stops, you're are at the end where the wood starts.
There is more info on the Fruit & Orchards forum.

Seekingtruth, ..this is interesting on this plum tree of yours!
Sorry, I can't help, perhaps someone in the Fruit forum with a picture.
Wow...70' tree is a large tree!

Konrad

    Bookmark   August 18, 2007 at 1:38AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Another good year's Plum harvest.
Don't forget, Fruit festival is on this weekend at Devonian Garden. I will have some fruit to taste!
Tonight I picked some of these and have the dehydrator going full blast.
Temperature forecast is -4C tonight...hopefully they are fine?

This is one larger, of several branches on this tree, Greengage [Reineclaude] Plum, first picture is looking from
the outside, second, looking from underneath.

Same Tree, Mt. Royal Plum, some Stanley, Wangenheim Prune, and some others


The first time some Mirabelle Plum on the same tree.

Two suckers,[from Nighbor] grafted to Greengage.

Another Tree, Supreme and Mt.Royal.

Sprout's Sunshine with a German, Wangenheim Prune on top.

Konrad

    Bookmark   September 13, 2007 at 1:31AM
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prairierose

Lovely plums, Konrad. Your plum trees remind me of my Dad's apple trees - several varieties per tree.
Connie

    Bookmark   September 13, 2007 at 12:16PM
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twrosz

Konrad, wonderful pictures of your plum trees! ... you have BC in your own backyard! I'm hoping to attend the Fruit festival this weekend!

Terry

    Bookmark   September 14, 2007 at 1:50AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you all!
Terry
Also, I will demonstrate the apple juicer tomorrow....lot's of juice to drink!
Hopefully I'll see you.
Konrad

    Bookmark   September 16, 2007 at 1:44AM
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klippster(2)

I would like to try Toka and Alderman plums but nurseries in Saskatchewan do not carry them. Are there any nurseries out of province that I could mail-order from?

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 11:44PM
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wcentrale

I picked a small plum at an organic farm. I'd like to grow the seed inside. Does anyone know how I might go about doing this?

I thought it might need to be scarified, and then frozen for a few weeks, then planted.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

    Bookmark   August 27, 2008 at 7:03PM
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orchidguy4ever(4a)

Great pix.
seekingtruth, check to see online information on prunus avium, known as bird cherry or siberian plum that originate in Western Siberia

    Bookmark   August 28, 2008 at 10:47PM
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peonyman(Zone 5, Lawrence, Ks)

This has been a really interesting thread. Sorry I got in on it so late. This has rekindled an idea that I have had for some time to top work 5 plum trees that I grew from seed and a purchased european plum tree that reverted to the rootstock the spring after I bought it. I am not that far north being located about 25 miles west of Kansas City Kansas, southern edge of zone 5. Anyone out there that would know what varieties would grow well here? I have done limited grafting but nothing like this. I think the right time to get scion wood would be the first of February and then do the top working the first of April? Is that close? Is there anyone near me that would be willing to part with scion wood?

    Bookmark   November 29, 2008 at 5:01PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Wcentrale, can you please fill in your zone in member page?
I usually plant seeds in a small tray and putting it out in the garden come winter.
Never had much luck germinating too many, some do.

Peonyman...
Your question might be better answered in the Fruit & Orchard forum. It looks like your trees are a perfect candidate for top working.
Yes, you can cut scion around this time, I usually cut about 2 weeks to a month before the buds swell.
When leafs open I usually start grafting and end about a month after that.
Keep your scion in a Ziploc bag with a moist but not soggy paper towel and put in fridge.

Below is a link of my modified bark grafting technique.

Konrad

Here is a link that might be useful: Bark Grafting

    Bookmark   November 30, 2008 at 12:04AM
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peonyman(Zone 5, Lawrence, Ks)

Konrad,
Thanks so much. I will try top working these this year and see how they turn out.

    Bookmark   November 30, 2008 at 11:28PM
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raffy_gman

WOW!!! almost had an orgasm...just kidding,
awsome pictures beautyfull fruit, nice colors...thanks, I have a satsuma tree (in its second season) and a late Santa Rosa tree (in its third season) they are starting to flower and the exitement is starting to grow...

Here is a link that might be useful: satsuma plum flowering

    Bookmark   February 27, 2009 at 6:35PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thanks Raffy!
Did you have fruit set on your trees?

Konrad

    Bookmark   April 22, 2009 at 10:48PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

I figured this one might go into the record book of our late ripening plums, this Mirabelle de Nancy, [picked today] was the
first time it could ripen on the tree.

    Bookmark   October 8, 2011 at 12:07AM
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beegood_gw

You sure do have a great way with fruit treess. Did you take classes or all self taught? I'm hoping my 4 or 5 in one plum tree will give me a few plums next year. It wintered well so there is hope.

    Bookmark   October 8, 2011 at 8:45PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Yea...self taught, always had a keen interest in my younger years on the farm in Switzerland.

    Bookmark   October 9, 2011 at 9:56PM
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beegood_gw

Well you are good student. When I was in Europe with the RCAF I visited Switzerland several times as I just loved it. Beautiful country.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2011 at 9:18AM
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sengyan

Hi Konrad,
Is the Mirebelle de Nancy good eating? It sure looked good - a little like apricot.
Sengyan

    Bookmark   October 11, 2011 at 3:45PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

If you like SWEET it might be good for you. Have never tasted anything sweeter then this in a plum but I really prefer a plum that has a bit of a "tang" to it, more acid. These plums apparently are very good for processing into jam.

You can read more in this Mirabelle thread..

Here is a link that might be useful: the best Mirabelle plums?

    Bookmark   October 11, 2011 at 9:33PM
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cmmwiebe

Some great photos and info here. Konrad any chance of getting a few pits from the Mirabelle plum?

Clayton in Saskatoon

    Bookmark   October 18, 2011 at 8:43AM
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njbiology

Hi Konrad, et al.:

Why do you say that 'Mt. Royal' is the only European plum (P. x domestica) that can be grown on it's own roots? By this, do you mean that it is the only one that is naturally dwarfed of size? If so, there is a seedling of 'Mt. Royal' that is also dwarfed; 'President' is semi-dwarf; etc.

Thanks,
S

    Bookmark   January 21, 2012 at 7:36PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Clayton,
Sorry, I usually put all seeds together into one bag in the fridge and planted later.

S..
The Mt. Royal is the only one I know of that is sometimes grown in our region on it's own root. Growing it on a more vigorous rootstock might be better for our harsh climate
because on it's own root it is a really slow grower.

    Bookmark   January 22, 2012 at 1:02AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Had some others fruiting the last year or two.

Brook Gold

    Bookmark   May 2, 2012 at 1:25AM
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Collin001

I was wondering if there was something to growing a tree on its own roots stock. All my trees which are on their own roots are growing much more slowly than the grafted ones. At this rate I'm going to be an old man before my wild plums are of use! When I pulled everything for landscaping I noticed the root systems were more extensive and reaching on the ungrafted varieties. I guess all the energy is being spent on the understory of the plant, hidden away making it appear less impressive above ground.

Looks good Konrad. Which of the cultivars on the cherry plum are we looking at?

    Bookmark   May 2, 2012 at 12:14PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Not really sure 100%, since gave up years and years ago with these plums I haven't kept track, think it is Opata?
I find a very slow grower too.

Have just emailed the picture for I.D. to
Dr. Bob Bors
Head of the Fruit Breeding Program

He say's...
Unfortunately, almost all cherry plums look just like that on the outside. Inside they are either red or green, so not much help there either but red is less common and might narrow it down to 3 or 4 varieties.
The only way to tell might be to have your fruit at the U of SK and taste it at the same time our fruits of cherry plums are ripe.
_________________________________________

I have tried growing some plums on their own root but experience what you said, ...very slow grower!
Since sprout sunshine plum is such a vigorous plum,...got it to root, twice now but it does not want to grow!

So, let me think what your'e growing on their own root, Mt. Royal, and......?

    Bookmark   May 4, 2012 at 1:12AM
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Collin001

Citing the Plums on the Prairies document pg 5 says Opata has green flesh.

Your flesh from the picture looks pretty red. Could be Zeta.

The recommended cultivars from the document are Dura, Manor, New Oka, and Zeta. Opata was a South Dakota cross which is vigorous enough to grow back most winter kill.

I'd like to see the full shape of these plants at 10 or so feet away. They look gangly enough that running them on an espalier system may not seem crazy. What do you think Konrad?

    Bookmark   May 4, 2012 at 12:24PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Sure, I do this already, some of the longer leaders, some I let crawl on the ground.

>>All my trees which are on their own roots are growing much more slowly than the grafted ones.What are they?

    Bookmark   May 4, 2012 at 9:18PM
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Collin001

This is good news. This means I can create a privacy fence using a chain fence on the west side of the property.

Trees on their own roots:
Ivanofka plum U of S plug
Apricot cross U of S plug. (last plant I have to break dormancy so I am pretty pumped about late bloom times)
2 Wild Canadian plums U of S plugs
and 2 hazelnut/filbert crosses also U of S plugs (distinct genetic differences between the hazelnuts.)

All were transplanted to bigger pots or dug up. Inspected root growth and paid attention to number of lateral roots verses tap roots. While not comfortable about disrupting the trees the landscaping was necessary for drainage. This was an educational experience on what these plants are doing below the surface.

    Bookmark   May 5, 2012 at 1:42AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

I can understand, ...we're usually never concerned what's going on underground.
Perhaps graft them to a vigorous root stock, a project down the road. I was looking for some time now for a Canadian wild plum in my neck of the woods without success, a good pollinator, similar is the American wild plum which had flowered for 2 years, hasn't helped much. I also have Ivanofka, has bloomed about 3 or 4 years now with a handful of plums,...it might need to get older?

The reason why I tried to grow the Sprout's Sunshine Plum on it's own root is because when the Sprout Farm, ...according to my discussion with the owner said, they found this by accident,
it was one of their root stock seedling.

Now..this doesn't make any sense to me because on it's own it just does not want to grow!

    Bookmark   May 6, 2012 at 1:54AM
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Collin001

Very cool story Konrad. I'm surprised how Sprout was found. Maybe different soil conditions are blocking the roots? Maybe there are voles present? It is vole country here.

It goes to show you how people randomly sampling wild fruit can find the next big thing!

Last year when I was visiting relatives just outside Brooks I found a semi wild plum tree. The tree had already dropped all the its plums. They were light red. I expected the plums to be bad as they were all sitting on the ground. They were a bit mealy but were some of the sweetest plums I've tasted so far. The fruit resembled Pembina but tasted nothing like the Pembina fruit for sale at the market gardens. There was no tang or astringent taste of any kind. The fruit was easily sweet enough that any juice created would not require sweetening. It was that sweet! Maybe that is indicative of over ripe fruit? It was October after all.

Looking at the tree I had my doubts it was a grafted. The tree was an older tree. At least 20 years old (has been there before my relatives took possession of the property) but only 8' tall and gnarled and weathered looking. The tree was not watered but was mulched. Essentially it was on its own for most its life. It was overshadowed by a golden elder that was taking away the light. I saved the pits. If any of the seeds come up this year I will use them as them as rootstocks as the parent tree was just the right height.

    Bookmark   May 6, 2012 at 1:34PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

I find plum trees don't get HUGE around here, ..you might get a decant plum from one of the seedlings if they grow. I have a hard time getting them to grow, did any of yours came up?

Peach Plum
Have the first small crop, [ripe] plum of the season, got this one for about 10 years now but pollination seems to be the trouble, just a light fruit set, ..it does live up to its name, a beautiful large plum.

    Bookmark   August 12, 2012 at 12:31PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

PTITSIN Plum is getting ripe too.

Here a comparison with a penny in a bowl.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2012 at 12:36AM
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Mike_Ham

Hi Konrad,
You seem to be a resident expert on plums in Edmonton! I recently planted a Pembina plum. It died the first winter due to rabbit damage, so I replaced it with another. The damaged one seemed to have some life left in the root stock, so I planted it in my back yard, and there are now many shoots coming from the roots. The leaves seem different from my new Pembina, so I assume that's the root stock.

1) Any idea what the root stock is? Will it produce a tree that might pollenate my Pembina?

2) How do I prune these shoots to grow into a single tree? Trim all of the shoots except for one?

(I also have Nanking cherries planted in the front - will they possibly pollenate the Pembina?)

Thanks a lot! Your plums look gorgeous and I hope to grow some myself! :)

    Bookmark   August 17, 2012 at 1:05PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you Mike!
No idea of what root stock was used, it could be a wild plum which is always good to have around to pollinate other plums, I would let it grow a few years and see, you can also top graft something else but still let some of the wild plums grow. Yes, let the the largest shoot grow and cut the rest,..you might want to stake it for a couple of years. Nanking might work also if it flowers in the same time, the same goes with western sand cherries.
You'll find that not all is lost, rootstock, which is usually very vigorous grows very fast and you'll end up with a tree in no time. A wild plum or any plums are so pretty in spring when they flower, ..good luck!

    Bookmark   August 17, 2012 at 9:24PM
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Collin001

Sorry Konrad, none of the plums seeds came up. That is a beautiful peach plum you have there. How does it taste?

    Bookmark   August 18, 2012 at 11:47AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Too bad with your seeds,..sometimes it takes a couple of years for some to come up.
The plum taste nice, sweet and juicy, I would say like a good average plum, not something spectacular.
I got a call from somebody local here who said I sold him this plum tree 5 years ago and first time he picked about 6 plums, he was very pleased with it and said they were wonderful. He's neighbor bought a sprouts sunshine in the same time and it seem these two trees do the cross pollination. I have both trees together too but so far I think it is a poor outcome, something else might work better, perhaps a Canada wild plum.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2012 at 1:52AM
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Collin001

Well in the third year both plums had one plum each. Unfortunately the plum was picked by squirrels well before it became ripe. I see them climb the trees regularly and the fruit had bite marks. I am sort of worried that as these trees mature they will be squirrel bait and my hopes of sampling will be for naught.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 7:54PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

That's not bad in the third year!
Hopefully your neighborhood will grow more fruits so your trees will not be prime target. We have squirrels too but not many at all, one's in a while I see one. I think all my paper tags on trees disappeared by them this spring.

Here is a new one for me, called Zapie.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2012 at 1:00AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

I thought this year is early harvest, when looking back at my first post with sprouts sunshine Aug. 17, 2006, I picked them on weekend this year.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2012 at 1:05AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Out on the acreage I will be picking this week the same plum. This tree was munched over by a moose in winter, damaged flower blossoms a bit and pruned it pretty good, ...that's why some branches have no leaves.
The new branches what grew with new leaves have been nibbled away by deer.
This plum proves to be super hardy, I would think zone 2 because not even a inch will die back. The plum is really nice, tree grows like crazy and disease free so far. Overall the best plum for our cold zone I.MO.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2012 at 1:23AM
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Collin001

That is impressive Konrad. You might want to call up Rick at the U of S and send him a couple of samples of Sprout. This tree deserves propagation!

My own bit of good news. Despite having only one plum this year which was ravaged by a marauding squirrel, it seems I missed one plum on my Pembina. Today this greeted me on the ground. It was extremely juicy, sweet, but the flesh is quite sour. So typical plum. My first dividend since planting the tree three years ago. Not a big deal but the first piece of fruit I have produced on this property and thus worthy of a picture!

    Bookmark   September 3, 2012 at 7:51PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

This is great,...it's a start!
Supreme is similar to Pembina, as they say better tasting, very sweet, but skin on all Japanese plums I find bitter, some worse then others and can be different from tree to tree/shade or sun etc.

This Supreme picked on Sept. 1, 2012 backyard / Beaumont

    Bookmark   September 4, 2012 at 12:15AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

The Greengage is getting ready,...only the second decant crop because the mild winter was easy on the fruiting buds.

I wasn't expecting this many,..funny, when they turn yellow they really stick out.

    Bookmark   September 8, 2012 at 1:09PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

The Green Gage was awesome sweet this year.
Also Mirabelle, just picked today.
Nice thing about these European, they don't need a pollinator.

Mirabelle

    Bookmark   September 25, 2012 at 10:28PM
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embertr

Hi to everyone.

I've just gotten into the plum life by purchasing a few trees in Calgary. I got a Brooksred and Pembina. I was at the Fruit tasting at the Devonian gardens a few weeks back and enjoyed the taste of the GreenGage. I'd love to know where I could pick up some of these wonderful plums. Does anyone have a good source? Thanks very much and the pics I've seen in this thread look amazing. Maybe my apple trees will be jealous eventually.
Cheers.

    Bookmark   September 27, 2012 at 2:38PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

The Greengage at Devonian I think was mine, was surprised nobody else had them after giving scion wood out for over 7 years or so. This plum is really a zone 5 plum but can grow not too bad in a sheltered spot. Are you in Calgary?
Perhaps get some wood on our annual scion wood exchange, usually held in April, [same place] and top graft your other plum. I don't think you'll find any trees in nurseries around here. Or, I could graft onto a root stock come spring and you'll have a little tree the following year,...if the little tree makes the winter in my nursery out of town? I'm in the process of building a little root cellar and store some tender stuff in there but the cellar will not be ready for this fall.

    Bookmark   September 28, 2012 at 12:19AM
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embertr

Hey Konrad,
If that GreenGage was yours then thank you very much for sharing that. It was the best tasting Plum there. I had originally gone to the public day in order to sample apples to determine which I was going to get scion wood for next year. I was astounded by the quality and size of the apples being produced. But even more surprised by the plums, which I never thought would be that sweet. I immediately came back to Calgary and purchased the last 3 trees on the lot at my local Garden center. 1 pembina and 2 brookreds. I've also decided that if I can get the greengage I've got room for 5 or 10 along my fences. Just means something else has to make way! I like your grafting idea as well. I took a 1 day course with Amanda and had some success with the apple grafts I did this year from the scion exchange. I'll have to see if everything survives the winter this year. If you are doing GreenGage on root stock I'd be very interested as I'd like some smaller trees as I hope to try to Espalier them along my fences. Think it would be the best protection for them although we do get a lot of wind here. If you were at the Exchange this year then I probably met you as I had a chance to chat with lots of people there. Were you with Mr Evans by chance?

    Bookmark   October 1, 2012 at 12:17PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Well,...we get to meet this spring, did any greengage scion wood take?

I'll have Greengage again this year at the Devonian Garden show, ...
Saturday September 14th, growers day,
Sunday September 15th 10:00 am to 4:00 pm public day.

Had a nice little crop from the Ptitsin plum, think it's the #5, nice aromatic and freestone, [picture below] earliest plum from Aug.14th.

    Bookmark   August 26, 2013 at 11:32PM
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mattpf

You are the plum master Konrad.
I'd love to taste the pitsen plums as I almost planted a nice one this year .

    Bookmark   August 27, 2013 at 12:01PM
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Collin001

You know I will try to get to the Devonian show Konrad. I'll try to set my holidays to match. I would add that I am also interested in purchasing your juicer plans. What may I ask is growers day? Is that the day to trade scion wood or is that the next day? PM and I'll provide email info.

    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 6:15PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Great Collin!
Hope I didn't speak too soon about the Green Gage, this year they're ahead by almost two weeks, been picking the last several day's but today I saved some in the fridge,..hopefully they make it till then?

Haven't juiced out there for several years now since fruit rescue set up a stand. I don't have plans,..only pictures on internet. Sunday would be the day for public tasting, scion wood exchange is held in April.

Here is a link that might be useful: My Juicer

    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 10:00PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Looks like this Patterson Pride Plum is ripening out this year, usually it's touch and go,..first time bringing this to the show!

    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 10:49PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Got the Sunrise Apricots off today,..[small] comparing against the,..just over 2 inches Green Gage.

    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 10:55PM
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Collin001

Wow, those are very impressive. How is the taste of the Green Gauge?

    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 2:05PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Green Gage called in north America, or Reineclaude in German, around 2 inches in diam...was my favored early plum as a child,..still is, used to climb the tree, was huge and sometimes wasp would eat the yellow extra sweet one's..me too and ouch! No bitterness on the very thin skin, very sweet, soft and mellow flesh, never get soggy. Sometimes my mom canned them,...WOW!

    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 12:54AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Kind of semi freestone, fine texture flesh..melts in your mouth!

    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 2:11AM
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mattpf

I've got to do some exchanging with you this spring. I've got to get some of these European variety off you.

My Italian plums are doing the best this year. They seemed more hardy than the brookgold and much hardier than the westcot and rated for zone 5. I'm south of Calgary on the cusp of zone 4 so I'm thinking this is probably why they are grow so great. Didn't get much fruit rain wiped me out. But the trees are huge already and this is only year two after planting.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 3:03PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Scionwood exchange is usually held in April at the the Devonian Garden, please check with me in March or so.

Here, two more Varieties I had a the show.

Damson, nice little plum, a bit like a small Italian.

    Bookmark   January 9, 2014 at 11:34PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Ivanovka plum
not looking at their best because I had to pick them about 2 weeks before the show.

    Bookmark   January 9, 2014 at 11:42PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

American Plum, [could be some seedling]..used allot for root stock, also good as a pollinator for other plums. Flesh is sweet & juicy, skin is very bitter.

    Bookmark   January 9, 2014 at 11:53PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

This pink flowering plum was found in southern Alberta on a abandoned homestead, fruits are similar to the American, above.

    Bookmark   January 10, 2014 at 12:22AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Here the fruit

    Bookmark   January 10, 2014 at 12:31AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

This is a none fruiting plum, Muckle Plum, Prunus x nigrella.
A great bee plant, pink flowering shrub.

    Bookmark   January 10, 2014 at 12:41AM
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vic2b3

Having just read this chain it occurs to me that in reply to Collin001 query from May 2012, it might be worth trying to root prune his trees to jump start fruiting. In which case to prune around half of the tree one year and the other half in the next.
Possibly this may lead to an explosion of root suckers that should be torn off, not cut.
Are any of you growing plums/gages as fans on south facing walls or fences?
Anyone know of any fruit convention/fairs in Manitoba apart from the Morden apple festival.

    Bookmark   January 19, 2014 at 10:55PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

From last year,..getting better pollination, seems like the American plum near by helps.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2014 at 1:16AM
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mattpf

Konrad your plums are beautifull. Not a lot of people appreciate a nice plum maybe because the name prune? You are the plum master.

    Bookmark   May 4, 2014 at 12:42AM
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goldenheights

Konrad what plum root stock do you find the best for zone 3

    Bookmark   May 16, 2014 at 10:48AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

I can't really say what root stock,..been buying some Siberian plum seedlings from Boughen nursery in Nipawin, Saskatchewan, not all were hardy, and some died from not heaving roots, useable was about 50% ..dug up suckers.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2014 at 5:23PM
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twrosz

So, I've picked up 'Toka' and 'Mount Royal' ... should have gotten that large in flower 'Mount Royal' at Ellerslie Greenhouse when a friend and I had met there with Konrad and his wife, that sure was a very fine tree that likely would have produced fruit already this year ... oh, we enjoyed a good visit also :)

Could anyone possibly identify a large blue plum by the foliage shot below? A Polish friend has this large late maturing plum that grows to the size of an hen's egg, it's probably an Italian type? The foliage is large and thick textured, photo is of grafts put on my tree this spring.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 3:26PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Yeah,..nice trees don't come around often.

This foliage does resemble a large plum,..there ares so many!
Hopefully it will make the winter.

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 2:31AM
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twrosz

Konrad, my friends have had the large blue plum for many years in their rather open exposed Edmonton yard, so I'm hopefully it'll do well for me with all the wind protection that exist here. I'll be seeing the folks in a few days time and will check on this tree.

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 12:52AM
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Collin001

Well this year was largely a bust except for one Pembina plum. Maybe one day my trees will set fruit like yours Konrad.

The size is exceptional this year. I can't imagine what an entire tree of fruits like this would be like. From the hue I'd say about another 5-7 days before ripe? If memory serves the fruits started to drop around the 7-10th of Sept. last year.

Chances are the bulk fruit shot will be for the next owner to enjoy. Still I operate by the old adage, when presented with the opportunity to create beauty, take it!

    Bookmark   August 31, 2014 at 1:29PM
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donna_in_sask

^I beat you, Collin...got THREE Pembina plums this year! Lol. I really need to plant another plum tree...when I first put this one in, my next door neighbour had planned to plant one as well so we would have proper pollination. Well, she moved away before doing that.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good pollinator for the Pembina? Someone mentioned Brookred...I don't have a huge amount of room, so would like something that tastes good.

    Bookmark   August 31, 2014 at 5:45PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Terry...have you checked with your friend on that plum?
Would be nice to have some at the show.

Collin, lovely...one is better then none, be patient. If plum feels hard at that stage then let it on the tree another 2 or 3 day's and check again.
If you have no room for another tree or more, then top grafting some branches would make a big difference. I'm not sure what does it for my trees/grafts but I think the Ptitsin #5 is good to have. I also top grafted prunus Nigra on this spring.

Picked about 2/3 of the Supreme and most of the Sprout's Sunshine today.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 1:17AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Greengage is getting ripe, picked one today,....just awesome, best plum one can grow in a very sheltered spot, town or city.

Here, some of the Sprout's Sunshine with Supreme

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 1:22AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

OH..if you have no room for more trees, you might want to try Mt. Royal prune plum, self fruitful, no other trees needed.
This branch is top grafted onto the Supreme,...still need at least another week or so until ripe.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 1:32AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Here a test graft on the left from this spring, [prunus cerasifera x salicina 'RUBY'] about 6 foot up on the Sprout's Sunshine, ...that little branch just loaded, energy went into the fruits, the graft/wood has grown so much bigger in one season.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 1:49AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

About a week or more behind is this other, allot smaller Supreme tree, grafted about 8 years ago. It's a little cramped in there and doesn't get as much sun, nevertheless, fruits look good. Right now, this tree carries another 3 or 4 different plums.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 2:00AM
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Collin001

To answer your question Donna if you can get or graft wild plums that would be your best option according to the U of S.

This is my second attempt with a wild plum. Last winter took out my previous attempt. The problem is the area is prone to excessive moisture as the city will not enforce broken eaves on the neighbouring property. This meant super saturated heavy soil which is tough for anything other than poplar or basswood.

Konrad's recommendation of increasing graft varieties is the next best thing you can do. However due to wind considerations to the front yard I had to be pretty aggressive in my pruning routine. The winds we experience here snap lots of city trees.

Konrad, your shot always inspire the imagination. My plan originally was to let these wild plums grow tall and lanky. If one of the three could make it they would make a good place to start grafting as this area is protected by three sides with structures. I figured the wild varieties stand the best chance of surviving the grey clay. I've been amending the soil but it keeps reverting back, it is weird here.

I have practiced grafting somewhat but really should take a class. Then I'd be a bit more confident.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 1:27PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

You got the right idea, Collin!

I said this before...was told many years ago at the fruit show that my labeled plum tree Pembina was not Pembina, they said it's Supreme,.. so I've been saying Supreme ever since.

Looking just now from Rick Sawatzky description,.......
Supreme is another Uof S plum, yellow with a red blush, 5 cms in diameter, of excellent quality and ripening in late August.

I can't see yellow in my plums! Theyr'e very close to Pembina but definitely not semi-free stone as said.

From Rick Sawatzky...
Pembina is a dark red plum with a bluish waxy bloom on the skin. The fruit is approximately 5cms in diameter, has very sweet flavourful flesh, a semi-free stone, moderately sour skin

Is yours like this?? Please observe your plum.

I was hearing also, Pembina does split/crack easy, my Supreme doesn't.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2014 at 2:48AM
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donna_in_sask

My Pembina looks like the ones on the internet. There isn't any yellow as far as I can tell, only red with this bluish waxy bloom. It is very sweet; can't eat the skin because it is too tough and sour. I would like to know how konrad grows such blemish-free fruit, mine are sometimes quite scabby.

I have never tried grafting, don't have a clue where I would even find the plant material to do that in my city. Maybe since some of these plums were developed here, the university is an option, but I would rather just buy a tree.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2014 at 10:27AM
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twrosz

Awesome photos Konrad! I might possibly have some 'Mount Royal' plums next year upon the vigorous grafts I did spring 2013 from scion wood received from you :)

Konrad, my Polish friends plum tree has gone into decline due to a damaged and decaying stem, there is no fruit and it appears the tree will likely die.

Donna, cleft grafting is rather a very simple method, I had about 90% success with it this spring. Hopefully, you can obtain some varieties to assist with pollination, plums can be sooo frustrating!

    Bookmark   September 4, 2014 at 10:31PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Yes..ones you start grafting you'll be hooked!

Terry, hopefully your friend has given out enough scion wood for it's survival.

Tonight, was checking on the still green plums on a couple grafted twigs,..about 2/3 were on the ground, finding out that these were ripe! Thinking back,..yeah, I forgot about them, got some wood from a fellow member of the fruit group a couple of years back,..only to find out that it's a Green Japanese plum I grafted again this spring from the same person.

They're small plums about the size of Ptitsin, around one inch.
Clingstone, very sweet. One plum I pulled off the skin to show color of flesh.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2014 at 11:15PM
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alcan_nw(z1 AK)

I thought one more picture would fit in nice because it is a cold hardy plum that originally came from Alberta from Mr. Lee which is early season and up to 1.5 inches.

Picture taken in the far north last summer

    Bookmark   December 19, 2014 at 3:33PM
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twrosz

alcan_nw, that's one heck of a loaded branch!

Konrad, your small green plum shown just above looks much like what I had also grafted upon my tree, the plums produced were sooo small that I had removed the branch and will re-graft it to something else.

    Bookmark   December 19, 2014 at 11:50PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

alcan_nw,..thank your for posting this, didn't know Mr. Lee had
one, how does it taste?

Terry, yeah, did you get yours from Tony also,..he had some larger ones at the show but you're right, most are small. I'll keep it alive and might use it for breeding, it might help the pollination of others,..can't have too many plums!

    Bookmark   December 20, 2014 at 12:19PM
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alcan_nw(z1 AK)

Konrad, The image of Lee's red was taken during a summer tour that I wasn't on so I never had one yet. The only thing I have had before is pollen from this Lee red which resulted better than most others when crossed on another plum.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2014 at 4:14PM
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