Big broom taken down by storm Eino

Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)November 19, 2013

Picea abies with a big broom on top was spared when area was clearcutted. Tree like this is very vulnerable in the middle of clearing and after almost a year of standing there storm called Eino came and took it down. That was 2 days ago.

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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

The broom is beautifully roundshaped and pretty tight by structure .

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 11:43AM
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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

I call this broom `Einoô after the storm that fell it.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 11:47AM
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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

It would have been nice to have it there as a monument of nature but since it had to go down, the timing was definitely right as it can now be stored for propagating purposes.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 11:53AM
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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

Part of broom `Einoô, about to be preserved on ice and snow until grafting time.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 11:59AM
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mirek_l

Very nice! Super!
Now you can safely grafted.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 12:04PM
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monkeytreeboy15(Zone 7b/8a)

Cool!
I like how you have a big chunk of it in a bucket.

Best of luck with the grafting; looks somewhat blue!

-Sam

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 12:10PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

you know.. as well as most of us.. that thing was never going to stand there.. in a clear cut area ... especially with a planetary orb balanced on top of a 100 foot telephone pole.. lol ....

you have enough stock.. why not graft some immediately ...

mail some off ...

cover all your bases.. rather than hoping ice will work ...

ken

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 12:35PM
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cococo(7 Nashville)

Great broom.Beautiful color.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 1:46PM
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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

Right, Ken, even spruce whitout a ball on top couldnôt stand a chance in those circumstances. Root system is way too shallow.

Well here we have snow coming in next few days. I have learned by experience that grafting material, buried in snow, will stay fresh amost forever. Sure i will share some of it aswell.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 1:46PM
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henksgarden

Very nice compact broom succes with grafting

Henk

    Bookmark   November 20, 2013 at 1:19AM
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NoVaPlantGuy_Z7b_8a(Alexandria, VA 7B/8A)

Nice broom! This is OT, however, I have always wanted to ask why is it that Picea Abies look so different over here in the states than they do elsewhere. Is it environmental factors? Ecosystem / Habitat? They are very common here in the states however most of them appear vastly different. Very wide, far reaching branches giving the tree more rectangular and / or odd shape rather than the traditional narrow / conical / spire like appearance. I'm also aware that there are alot of cultivars of it as well, perhaps that is a factor? Sometimes they are so different looking they don't even really look like a traditional spruce. Just curious. Thanks for indulging the question!

    Bookmark   November 20, 2013 at 1:55PM
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wisconsitom

Nov, I think most of what you're seeing is due to domestic (US) NS being relatively open-grown and shots like this one in this thread showing a forest tree. Even though it's open around that tree now, throughout most of its life it was surrounded by its mates and had to adopt the more usual forest growth form-most growth continually being directed towards the main leader.

+oM

    Bookmark   November 20, 2013 at 2:05PM
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sluice

Wow! Nice broom.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2013 at 9:25PM
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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

novaplantguy, i donôt know. My quess is that picea abies is just such a shapeshifter and itôs genome allows big variety of appearances. Also here you can find many kind of branchangle and width within the same piece of forest. There is also many times more mutations in picea abieses than in other species at least here in Finland.

    Bookmark   November 21, 2013 at 1:28AM
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mesterhazypinetum(6)

Jarpe, congrats to Eino.
I send you a finnish surprise, which is not known for you. I found in1991 in Savonlinnna a hybrid Abies seedling, which is possible alba x lasiocarpa. His name is Abies savonlinnensis x, and a first graft is made of it some years ago. I'd like to send you and Finland some scions. An other photo is here: http://files.conifertreasury.org/2013/112MPHSzeged/Abies%20savonlinnensis%20x%20DSCN0935.JPG

Zsolt
conifertreasury.org

Abies savonlinnensis x

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 6:45AM
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mesterhazypinetum(6)

Abies savonlinnensis x
Not yet staked

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 7:14AM
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Jarpe(z4-z5 Finland)

Interesting abies hybrid, Zsolt. If you mail me scions, i see that it is later on spread among conifer people here. Some of succesfull grafts would be from very beginning raised at Lappeenranta, very near Savonlinna where you made this discovery. Good time for mailing scions would be end of March or beginning of May.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 9:10AM
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NoVaPlantGuy_Z7b_8a(Alexandria, VA 7B/8A)

Wisconsintom: I think you are right. I had thought of that. But like Jarpe said, they are shapeshifters, espeically over here in the states it seems. They vary greatly. Sometimes when grown in groups or stands they do take on the narrow spire shape, but ive also seen many together that were mostly wide and irregular as well. One thing, at least around here where I am, that I have noticed is that the ones grown up on the mountains behind our house are MUCH more like the ones you see in the forest. Most of those are very narrow, spire like cones. Perhaps its also elevation and other factors such as exposure to high winds, cooler temps...etc. It does get very windy here (gusting over 40MPH today) but up on those ridges above 800' (our very nearby mountains top out at just a few feet under 2,000') its much windier. On a day like today it gusts 55-65mph regularly up there. Now that I think about it, most tree conifers that are up on the ridges have much more of a very narrow / spire like habit. Sadly, no brooms that I have seen yet anywhere nearby.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 3:52PM
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wisconsitom

Yup Nova, and I in turn agree fully with the observation that, especially for a spruce, NS does exhibit a wide range of characteristics. Varied forms are common. I know of, for example, some specimens with very large side-branches which have become co-dominant leaders, something much more common among hardwoods. Another oddity is that every so often a specimen will arise having two leaders...and one of these will spontaneously begin to wrap itself around the other, such that in time, a double-spiral effect is created. Might sound crazy, but a place where I worked decades ago had a row of NS, one of which had just that feature! Imagine my surprise when, upon walking around my plantation a week ago, lopper in hand in order to "correct" a handful of trees, spruce, larch, etc. which had formed double leaders due to injury, etc. I came across one of mine, now maybe 7 or 8 feet tall, that is starting to do this! That one I left alone, to see if it will indeed continue the process. Sure does look like it's going to.

But yeah, as Spruceman-a member here who hasn't posted much recently-and I observed many years ago, NS seems to have quite a bit of genetic variability.

+oM

    Bookmark   November 24, 2013 at 4:33PM
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clement_2006


Picea abies "Eino" grafted in february.
Show your grafts, please.
Clement

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 6:58AM
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