Evans Cherry

gerry1(2b Sk)August 6, 2007

A number of years ago I was gifted with tissue cultured Evans Cherry. Shared one, one of the two planted in my garden grew into a beautiful tree. The shared Evans fruited early on while mine would have all of three to six ripened cherries - until this year. Have a bumper crop of lush red cherries this season. If there are any Evans Cherry growers reading this - please share your favorite recipes other then jelly and jam.

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Pudge 2b

I made a cherry sauce, sugar to taste, some cinnamon & thickened with tapioca. Goes well with ham, pork, a dollop on vanilla pudding or over ice cream. Only one of my 2 trees fruited well this year, but it's the first year with any significant amount of fruit so I'm happy. Unless my visiting aunt chooses to make cherry pies (and I'm hoping that will happen) then the rest will be left for the birds.

My Evans have struggled over the years - I planted them in 2000 and had at least 2 years where they died right back to the trunk. I've read that this has a lot to do with the amount of fall rains - they prefer real dry conditions after fruiting and into fall otherwise plenty of dieback. This past spring I had dead branches but for the most part, they are nice and full.

My big beef with these trees, though, is the suckering well away (5' or more) from the original tree. If I'd known that, I would have planted them elsewhere or perhaps not planted them at all. I have cherry tree suckers popping up in flower beds and right in the middle of a clump of flowers. I've considered moving the flowers and just letting the cherries sucker to their hearts content - and call it the cherry grove. Just seems easier than the battle to control it.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2007 at 7:04PM
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gardenista

I have 4 Carmine Jewel dwarf cherry trees, which are a newer variety than the Evans, which are known to produce significant suckers. Mine are 4 years old and have no suckers. The Carmine Jewel are stated to have "slight" suckering and Crimson Passion have "rare" suckers according to the U of Sask where they were developed.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2007 at 9:52PM
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cmmwiebe

I bought a lb of Evans at the Saskatoon Farmers Market and my wife made a Cherry Crisp. We punched the stones out with wooden skewers and it worked great! I actually ate it for breakfast with milk.
I saved the seed and am going to plant them, so wondering if anyone has experience with how consistent they are in producing a like plant or will there be some segregation from cross pollinating?
I am always sorry to hear that plants sucker. So much work. I have a seedling from the U of S material and it has created a patch 2 to 3 ft. square. I am cutting it back to one stem but not a great thing.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2007 at 11:38PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

This is my first bumper crop after about 11 years since planting...well, it was fairly good last year too, only due to 2 mild winters we had...I think?
We picked about 2/3 of the crop, [8 pails] and juiced them all today, got sweetened with honey, some gets frozen and some goes to wine. The pulp gets dried for bird food.
Konrad

    Bookmark   August 7, 2007 at 1:20AM
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gerry1(2b Sk)

Now that was worth the asking! Thank you for all the great ideas - and the pics. Will have to search out some recipes and get to more picking.

I too am finding suckering a problem - the tree is lovely, the fruit really lush but those suckers are going to make for the need to rethink the perennial garden.

    Bookmark   August 7, 2007 at 10:52AM
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cmmwiebe

Konrad I have wanted to say how much I enjoy your photos!

    Bookmark   August 13, 2007 at 8:21PM
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sazzyrose(2b Sk)

You have quite the operation there Konrad. I can't wait until my cherry trees produce.

Shelley

    Bookmark   August 13, 2007 at 9:51PM
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prairierose

Oddly enough, my Evans Cherry tree has never suckered. We have a bumper crop this year too. We picked 8 gallons today and I canned them. My family likes them just as a fruit. 32 1/2 quarts - our best crop ever. I can them as whole cherries in a thin syrup ( 1 cup sugar to 2 cups water). Delicious!
Connie

    Bookmark   August 13, 2007 at 10:13PM
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cmmwiebe

Connie would you ever have a few pits from your Evans you could spare?

Clayton

Saskatoon

    Bookmark   August 14, 2007 at 11:14PM
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northspruce(z3a MB CDA)

Konrad, what a beautiful looking crop on your Evans cherry! Nice pics.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2007 at 9:12AM
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Laurie_z3_MB(sw MB)

Last year I had 3 ice cream pails of cherries, so I canned a few quarts, made some pie filling and jelly. I also made some cherry liqueur.
You take 4 cups of berries, 3 cups sugar, and 3 cups vodka and put into a 2 quart jar. Shake it every day to dissolve the sugar, and let it sit on the counter for 3 months. Strain, and serve. It makes for an awesome Black Forest Cake when you drizzle it onto the cake.;^)

    Bookmark   August 15, 2007 at 7:45PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Thank you all!

>>Connie would you ever have a few pits from your Evans you could spare?A reminder....
Evans cherry pit seedlings make inferior trees,...according to MR. Evans, true, I have not seen any fruiting, all I use them for root stock.
Konrad

    Bookmark   August 18, 2007 at 1:49AM
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prairierose

Clayton, sorry it took so long for me to get back to you. I haven't been on the computer much. I checked my big Evans cherry tree. The ones that were too green to pick are ripening nicely, so I should have some pits I can send you. I've never sent anything before: when they're ready I'll ask you for instructions. I don't know how Evans seedlings will turn out, but I do know that results from Nanking cherries are pretty variable. Most of mine are seedlings (the birds leave pits every), and they vary in maturity dates, and size to some extent. I even have one that has pink cherries instead of red ones. They are sweeter, but much less flavorful. No matter how the cherries turn out though, they still make a nice hedge beside one of my gardens.

Connie

    Bookmark   August 19, 2007 at 9:16PM
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marciaz3 Tropical 3 Northwestern Ontario

Connie, i sent some Nanking cherry pits to Clayton. The good part is that you get to eat the cherries first! :D

    Bookmark   August 19, 2007 at 9:21PM
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cmmwiebe

Connie send me email at cmmwiebe at gmail.com about the seeds. You don't have an email link on your page. I would only need say ten seeds. Be sure they are dry as I got some from Stephie in BC and the two with a little pulp on actually where softened so I could get the cover off. See my blog below. They were not a stone fruit so this is understandable. Wrap in a little paper towel or small bubble wrap. I will get back to you at the address above.
Thanks.
Clayton

Here is a link that might be useful: My Blog

    Bookmark   August 20, 2007 at 9:14AM
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dongb

For my birthday I have been given two Evans bali, which I plant to put in the ground this morning, so I have been reading up on the variety. About the tree's enthusiastic tendency to sucker, I believe the shoots can be dug and replanted for an endless multiplication of individuals. True?

    Bookmark   August 21, 2007 at 8:03AM
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gerry1(2b Sk)

The cherries and apples have kept me busy! Made the lovely cherry sauce, some fruit, didn't have time to pit the cherries so the Cherry Crisp and Pie filler remain on the agenda for next year. Missed on the liqueur- another next year project - we love those Black Forrest Cakes and word has it that our prairie grown cherries make for a superior product so that is must for the next cherry crop.

A friend of mine purchased the grouping offered by the university a few years back - talked to her last evening and she tells me they are not suckering as the Evans has. Unfortunately raccoons beat her to the crop this year - she did note the cherries growing on her trees were about the same size.

That is some operation you have Konrad. May I ask where you get those food grade containers - I so could use some rather then buying an extra crock for my cabbage - or should I take up wine making. Now about that wine ... sounds like a fun project. Any special hints to be sharing? You don't have to pit them - right?

    Bookmark   August 25, 2007 at 1:20PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

>>For my birthday I have been given two Evans bali,>>I believe the shoots can be dug and replanted for an endless multiplication of individuals. True? Found this on the web from Jim Kohut
I now have some great news to report ! Bailey Nurseries has confirmed that the two cultivars 'Evans Bali' and 'Bali' cherry are in fact the same 'Evans' cultivar that has taken Canada by storm.

dongb
Evans are usually tissue cultured and the whole tree is the same cultivar, this means you can dig and grow the same cultivar.

Thank you gerry1!

>> May I ask where you get those food grade containers - I so could use some rather then buying an extra crock for my cabbage Not sure which one, the plastic on top is from the Wine making store, the bottom is a Stainless
high pressure Keg and is used for fermentation.

>> I so could use some rather then buying an extra crock for my cabbage I have seen someone used one of the old aluminium Beer Keg, cut the top off and you have a nice crock.
The inside has a nice none metalic finish, like a bathtub finish.

>>You don't have to pit them - right?No, you can use them whole.

Konrad

    Bookmark   August 26, 2007 at 11:35PM
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puddle_of_light_yahoo_com

it looks like this thread has been dormant for a while, but i've been searching to no avail for care tips/help for the evans bali cherry tree and was hoping someone is still out there & has some feedback! we just bought a house last june with a tree that is maybe 2-3 years old & is very sad. i'm not sure if the gal didn't take care of it last year or what happened, but it is not flowering and there are no leaves on it, and it seems like it is definitely time for some signs of life!! it doesn't feel completely dead. my husband & i are putting down some compost & mulch to past the drip line. any other suggestions?

thanks!!

    Bookmark   April 29, 2011 at 2:01PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Bali does graft them...at least some, you might have one of these?
Growing on their own root they don't need any care whatsoever.

    Bookmark   April 29, 2011 at 7:48PM
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njbiology

Hi Konrad, et al:

1. I planted a 'North Star' sour cherry and will be getting two of the SK dwarf (hybrid) sour cherries. Having these, is there much of an advantage to also getting an 'Evans' (aka 'Bali'/United States) cherry?

2. I take it that the reason the 'Evans' cherry suckers would mean that it is on its own roots, and not grafted; or initially grafted then steeped. Is there any advantage to having sour cherries like 'Evans' and 'North Star' on P. mahaleb rootstocks? They are already dwarfing and the rootstock will, for various reasons, not confer any (further) dwarfing. Perhaps, the P. mahaleb rootstock makes for a more disease-resistant tree? If not, I'd like to steep my sour cherries, burying the graft-union so that, in time, the scion will put out its own roots: will it, and should I do this?

Thanks,
Steve

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 7:27PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

For what I've heard the Evans does not produce much at all in
warmer zone's like 5-6 and up, if you have room then you might want to try and see for yourself, this might also be true with the other SK cherries?
Yes, Evans is vigorous, suckers and it does very well on it's own root. Grafting to mahaleb rootstock should help against suckering...not sure about disease for you area, you would have to check it out. I don't think I would bury the graft in your climate,.... but then, get two of each, one bury and one not, keep the one you like down the road.

I think a North Star is a better Joice for you area.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 10:49PM
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njbiology

Hi,

I'm now growing the following varieties of sour cherry: Northstar; Montmorency; and Jublieum.

Is there any advantage to me having an 'Evans/Bali' cherry, since I can grow the above (I'm in zone 6b), assuming I can even get by with growing this variety in my comparatively warmer climate.

Thanks,
Steve

    Bookmark   March 30, 2012 at 5:26PM
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don555(3a)

I don't know about Jublieum, but I think Evans/Bali fruit is very similar to Northstar and Montmorency, so unless you want a third tree with pretty much identical fruit, I wouldn't bother.

don

    Bookmark   March 30, 2012 at 6:04PM
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njbiology

How tall/wide does 'Evans'/'Bali' cherry get?

If you burry the graft-union of a sour cherry that is grafted on a rootstock such as P. mahaleb, will the scion eventually root?

I steeped a sour cherry and it only budded and persists, but doesn't seem to be growing. However, having done this to my apricot tree, the apricot is growing - although I do not know if it (did) will root?

Thanks,
Steve

    Bookmark   May 19, 2012 at 6:18PM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

On it's own root they say it gets around 12 feet tall, not sure on the Mahaleb root stock, you might want to ask in the fruit & orchard forum.
I would think the Evans would root out, I'm only speculating on this because I've seen rooting out near the surface. Cut some vertical slits into the stem where you want it to root, check a year later my removing the soil.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2012 at 1:18AM
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Konrad___far_north(3..just outside of Edmonton)

Done some sucker transplant, from a clump I could divide into 7.

    Bookmark   May 21, 2012 at 2:34AM
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