Please help me identify this unknown conifer!

FxBeastDecember 3, 2011

Hello everyone!

There is a nice big conifer growing on the side of one of the streets near where I live. I have seen several trees around the town that appear to be the same species, but nobody seems to know what it is. I have tried identifying it by comparing with pictures online but so far my search has been unsuccessful. I am interested because there I have a large piece of land where I would like to plant some conifers, and this particular kind seems like it grows well in my area. So thinking in the long term, I would like to figure out what species it is so I can get seedlings/seeds. I would really appreciate any input from the experts here! Thanks!

Here are some pictures (click to enlarge):

The whole tree

A bit closer to the tree

Close to the base - bark

Foliage

Any help is much appreciated!!

Regards,

FxBeast

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salicaceae(z8b FL)

A pine (Pinus species). Maybe Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata)?

    Bookmark   December 3, 2011 at 10:00PM
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pineresin

Agree, probably Monterey Pine Pinus radiata. Looks to be infected with pine pitch canker (casues the dead branches). What location is it?

Resin

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 6:38AM
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FxBeast

This is in a town in the South American Andes. I thought it might be Pinus radiata or maybe Pinus wallichiana. If it is radiata then pretty much all the trees around are also infected, because they all look pretty much alike.
Does anyone know of any large tree (conifer or otherwise) that grows well at high altitude (3500+m)in a dry climate (rain in the summer), and on somewhat clay soils? Tough question, I know. ;) I've been researching this for months...
The only thing that seems to thrive is Eucalyptus globulus, but I'm looking for something that will let other plants and grass grow under it. So this pine (if we can determine what it is)seemed like a good choice, but if it is susceptible to this infection then maybe not so much. Any ideas?
FxBeast

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 2:18PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Himalayan white pine is quite different, a translucent grayish tree with down-hanging or arching silver-banded needles in bundles of 5.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 4:05PM
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pineresin

"This is in a town in the South American Andes .... Does anyone know of any large tree (conifer or otherwise) that grows well at high altitude (3500+m)in a dry climate (rain in the summer), and on somewhat clay soils?"

Which town / what latitude? What are the minimum temperatures there? Much below 0�C? Presumably not too low if Eucalyptus globulus does well. And what rainfall?

A couple of ideas (only provisional, subject to change on location & climate information!), would be Pinus canariensis and Pinus hartwegii.

Also, can you get any photos of some cones of the pines? That would help confirm it is P. radiata (or not!).

Resin

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 6:11PM
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FxBeast

I will take more pics when I'm back in town next week. During what season is it that Pinus cones usually mature?
It's between 16 and 17 degrees South. It's at an elevation of around 3700 m according to my cellphone's GPS. Average lows in the winter are -2C and the lowest ever recorded was -11C. As far as rainfall, it occurs mostly in the summer and the yearly total is between 580 and 680 mm.
I was also thinking that it might be Pinus patula, I'm starting to doubt this however. Do you think that Pinus wallichiana would do well in these conditions? What about Paulownia tomentosa?
FxBeast

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 7:28PM
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pineresin

Thanks!

Pinus patula probably wouldn't be quite hardy enough, it gets frost damage between -5 to -10C, and also likes a bit higher rainfall. Best options would be some of the other higher altitude Mexican pines, like Pinus engelmannii, Pinus hartwegii and P. ayacahuite, they come from very similar climates.

Pine cones typically mature in the winter, but on several species often persist on the trees for a long time after maturity, so getting pics won't be difficult if you can find a younger tree with them on low branches.

Resin

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 4:16AM
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