Seminole Pumpkin

Stellabee(7, Atlanta)January 27, 2013

Hi Everybody,

I just ordered some Seminole Pumpkin seed from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. I've never had luck with Pumpkins being healthy and prolific here in Georgia and was very curious about this indigenous Florida pumpkin the Seminole Indians grew in the Everglades. My thinking is that if any pumpkin could handle Georgia's heat, humidity and disease that it would be a pumpkin native to the South. I'm just worried about how it will handle composted clay soil instead of sandy loam.

Has anyone here in Georgia in the clay zone grown this pumpkin??! If so, please do advise...

Thanks!

Stella

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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

I've grown these before. They do seem to like more moisture than other squash, but I have not really grown them in clay, but in really good soil. I think they do fine here in amended clay. The vines grow long and really like to climb. I've grown them on a chain link fence and the vines were maybe 30-40 feet long. The first two pumpkins were HUGE! Perhaps 30lbs, I think because I was trimming vines. So when I've grown them again I have trimmed vines because my friends seemed to like them very large. They were sweet tasting, just fine as a squash.

    Bookmark   January 27, 2013 at 5:33PM
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urbanfarmer7b

The Seminole pumpkin, c. moschata, is in the same species as butternut squash which means they have the solid stems which helps against vine borers. I agree with GGG they ramble and are climbers. I'm in Georgia clay as a base, but there's been a lot of compost over the years. I started from reading southern exposure seed exchange as well. I was tired of trying 'pumpkins' and have them succumb to viner bores and mildew, plus my kids were studying native americans in school. Everything it says in Southern exposure is true. It holds up really well. They are prolific. I haven't tried what GGG did in keeping only a few by cutting back. I get a quite a few 3-6 lb pumpkins, about the size of a butternut. If you grow them, they take a long time to mature, but you end up with a lot. They start and stay dark green until the end of the season and then they turn a buff tan color. When you pull the vines up, the ones that are large but still green will continue ripening in storage. They are delicious, they store well, and one 3 lb squash cut in quarters is a perfect side dish for four. As long as you give them full sun and some level of improved soil you'll be good.

    Bookmark   January 30, 2013 at 10:13PM
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Stellabee(7, Atlanta)

Hey GGG and Urban Farmer, thank you so much for the info. I didn't think anyone would have grown these here for some reason-expected no response. I feel really good about my order now!

Oh, by the way, do either of you remember the month you put the seeds in the ground?

Thanks Guys,

Stella

    Bookmark   February 1, 2013 at 10:09AM
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mcleod(8a)

I love seminole pumpkin, the flavor is so much better than butternut. I don't grow it regularly because I lack the space for it and I have just over a quarter acre under cultivation, that should tell you something. The vines are extremely rampant, I've measured them to forty foot. Other than that they thrive for me, in red clay loam, with little to no effort on my part.

    Bookmark   February 5, 2013 at 12:06AM
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urbanfarmer7b

I plant mine from seed after April 15. I might plant a week or two earlier in seed pots inside, if I m more organized than usual.

    Bookmark   February 6, 2013 at 10:09PM
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Stellabee(7, Atlanta)

Thanks, Urban Farmer...will do!

    Bookmark   February 7, 2013 at 1:17PM
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Stellabee(7, Atlanta)

I would not have imagined 40 ft, Mcleod?! I'm rethinking where my growing spot should be now...
Thanks for the info!

    Bookmark   February 7, 2013 at 6:34PM
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