Peruvian Daffodils

tkhooper(7)December 9, 2010

These plants had all green leaves on them when the snow hit. Now the leaves are slimy green goo. Is there any chance the bulb will survive? I'm pretty sure I won't get blooms this comming year. But have I lost them completely? Thank you for any insite you can give me.

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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

They'll be fine and you'll get blooms. They bloom in mid-summer, the leaves come back in early spring. Mine have never had a problem returning!

    Bookmark   December 10, 2010 at 11:13AM
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flora_uk(SW UK 8/9)

I was wondering exactly where tkhooper lives. It is really pertinent. I can only say that in the UK they are definitley frost tender, and will not survive our winters outdoors.

    Bookmark   December 11, 2010 at 7:37AM
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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

Flora, what is your zone there? I just went by the zone in the bi-line of tkhooper. I have grown the Peruvian Lilies for years hardy in the ground. I just throw mulch over them. Today the foliage was slimy. I just cut it back and threw a mulch of dry leaves over. They always seem to return and multiply for me.

    Bookmark   December 11, 2010 at 9:28PM
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aftermidnight Zone7b B.C. Canada

In my Vancouver Island zone 8, they would have to be lifted they certainly wouldn't winter here but I don't know if they would have to be lifted in zone 8 Georgia, totally different growing conditions.

Annette

    Bookmark   December 11, 2010 at 9:54PM
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tkhooper(7)

Interesting. I'm in southern virginia zone 7b. These are planted in the foundation bed so zone 8 for them. They came back last year after being covered in snow for several weeks. I was just worried that the cold temperatures came quickly this year and I wasn't sure how the bulbs would respond to that. But if yours come back and even bloom I'm going to hope they do the same here.

By the way have you ever tried to transplant them. I've heard they don't like it.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2010 at 8:33AM
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flora_uk(SW UK 8/9)

girlgroupgirl - your reference to 'Peruvian lilies' caught my eye. The OP asked about Peruvian daffodils, which I took to mean Hymenocallis sp. (not hardy in UK), not Peruvian lilies, i.e. Alstoemeria sp. (hardy in UK) We need to ask the OP which plant they are talking about.

Flora

    Bookmark   December 12, 2010 at 9:52AM
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flora_uk(SW UK 8/9)

Sorry - that should be AlstRoemeria.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2010 at 12:14PM
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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

I also took them to be hymenocallis, Flora. The reason being as I saw Zone 8 and the typical hymenocallis you see are sold as "peruvian lilies" and are very hard here. http://www.plantdelights.com/Catalog/Plants/Genus/Hymenocallis

These are much fancier, but the plant that is most often labeled "Peruvian Lilies" here in the Southeast US. I hadn't thought about the alstroemeria simply because I have not seen them labled as Peruvian Lilies in a long time, typically they go by their latin name here in the trade.

So TKhooper, do the ones you purchased intend to be the types of bulbs I sent a link to or these: (which incidently, have Peruvian Lily) at the top of the page!
http://www.plantdelights.com/Catalog/Plants/Genus/Alstroemeria

Many alstroemeria are hardy provided they get the right cultural requirements (and I have not really figured out exactly what that is, even though my friend three blocks away can't kill hers for trying!)

    Bookmark   December 12, 2010 at 7:10PM
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flora_uk(SW UK 8/9)

girlgroupgirl - that's a very interesting link, thanks. There seems to be more to Hymenocallis winter hardiness than just the temperature, as they certainly don't survive over here. I wonder if it's to do with the fact that our winters are wet as well as moderately cold? Also our summers are not as hot as they like and they often will not flower, even if lifted in winter or grown in pots. Perhaps the bulbs don't get sufficiently 'ripened' in our summers. They get listed over here as semi tropical. I attach a link to show you how they are viewed here. It's very interesting that there is such a wide difference in how they are viewed. Maybe we should be bolder and try them more.

Here is a link that might be useful: Hymenocallis

    Bookmark   December 13, 2010 at 1:13PM
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aftermidnight Zone7b B.C. Canada

Flora I really think it is our wet winters that do them in, on the other hand I have no trouble wintering Alstroemeria in the garden. I've always grown Hymenocallis in pots and dried them off in the fall.
I also can't winter Amaryllis in the garden for the same reason, too wet. I wonder if it's worth experimenting, try wintering by placing an upturned pot filled with mulch/leaves over one keeping the bulb on the dry side through the winter.

Annette

    Bookmark   December 13, 2010 at 2:26PM
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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

I'm inclined to agree about the wet winters. I overwinter amaryllids in the garden just fine in general, although a winter like this winter will do some of them in...

    Bookmark   December 13, 2010 at 9:13PM
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flora_uk(SW UK 8/9)

Amaryllis belladonna manages over here as long as it is put in the sunniest, driest, best drained position you can find. Mostly recommended for the foot of a S facing wall. Have you tried that one, aftermidnight?

Nerine bowdenii is another similar plant which I can grow even in a slightly shady garden. Flowering October - November.

But no way would the large flowered hybrid Hippeastrums (often referrred to as 'Amaryllis') survive outside.

Here is a link that might be useful: Amaryllis belladonna

    Bookmark   December 14, 2010 at 4:28AM
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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

I did loose a few of the cultivars once, so I made raised beds within the raised beds.... little half circles of stone (which I do for some irises also) that are raised a few inches above the beds (which in rainy places get compacted and kind of sink a bit again and get very compacted in some areas). This has worked quite well for me. If we are having weather like we are now having (super cold, days on end) I layer on the pine straw thick and that keeps 'em dry, if we are going to get rain at that time, I throw large black garden pots over the bulbs and weigh 'em down with a rock over the middle hole. No water gets in there. It's not decorative and it won't work for large stands of amaryllis, but this does the trick when needed. I have some larger stands of amaryllises and I keep those under the drip line and mulch well and plant in this compost from the County which is very well draining. That seems to work ok. Yes, fussier than some stuff I bother with but SO PRETTY!

    Bookmark   December 14, 2010 at 1:49PM
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tkhooper(7)

These are the spider lilies, I wasn't aware that they were called that. I just knew what was on their tag from walmart lol. I'm still pretty new to gardening. I started in 2005 and am slowly learning what I can about the plants that interest me.

Can anyone tell me if it is possible to transplant these without killing them?

    Bookmark   December 16, 2010 at 9:32AM
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girlgroupgirl(8 ATL)

tkhooper, I have transplanted many. They actually grow like wildfire and make loads of offshoots quickly but it takes two - three years for me to see lots of blooms on the new bulbils. Transplanting is easy, just do it when it warms up, after your last frost date.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2010 at 2:36PM
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tkhooper(7)

Thank you girlgroupgirl.

    Bookmark   December 17, 2010 at 9:56AM
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natalie4b(7b GA)

They come back year after year for me here in Georgia - zone 7b-8.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2010 at 10:07PM
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susie_gardener_2007(OK 7)

I've seen these lilies growing wild in the ditches just north of the Red River and they come back year after year. I've been tempted to stop and dig some up, except it's on a busy highway.

    Bookmark   December 22, 2010 at 1:58AM
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sweetannie4u(midOK_z6b/7a)

Susie,
I tried digging some once. They were buried quite DEEP. I quit digging and just pulled the dirt back around the stems and let them be.

I bought some once labeled Peruvian Lily. It grew that year for me and bloomed. What a beautiful and fragrant beauty. The tag said they were tender. I moved the pot into the greenhouse for the winter. Next spring. it was HUGE and bloomed again. Someone told me they would freeze, so I planted it out. I froze. Nothing left of the bulb next spring but a slimy mess where the bulbs had been. Needless to say, I was upset over the loss.

I want to grow one again. This time I will plant it in a big pot and haul it into the greenhouse in early fall.

~Annie

    Bookmark   December 23, 2010 at 11:54PM
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sweetannie4u(midOK_z6b/7a)

Oops! I meant "Wouldn't freeze". My bad.

    Bookmark   December 24, 2010 at 2:39PM
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