Removing Chinese Grass

gidget1963February 24, 2006

I have a small lot and several years ago, someone planted Chinese Grass as a natural barrier between my lot and my neighbors. Over the years, this grass has expanded into my lawn and now is threatening to take it over. In the past, I have tried digging it out to keep it in "check" but it is a loosing battle. Any suggestions as to how I can kill this thing in order to bring it back to the initial row of grass. Thanks G.

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donn_(7b-8a)

The "Chinese Grass" I know isn't a grass at all, but a perennial shrub. If you can't dig it up, and don't have livestock to browse it down, RoundUp will kill it. Cut it down to ground level, and paint the exposed stems with undiluted RoundUp, the tough brush and ivy strength. It may take more than one treatment, but it'll eventually kill it.

    Bookmark   February 24, 2006 at 8:51AM
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gidget1963

Thanks for the advice. I will give Round Up a try.
Regards. G.

    Bookmark   February 26, 2006 at 3:35PM
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gillespiegardens(Z6 cinti ohio)

Well.... you could have Miscanthus chinensis grass which is also sold as Miscanthus floridulus and is a huge grass reaching well over 10 feet high without flowers and is very invasive by self sowing seeds. Some have called it Chinese grass and some have called it Chinese Silver grass. You could also have Miscanthus sinensis Gracillimus reaching an average 5 feet without flowers which also has a common name of Chinese silver grass ( though most know it by the common ame of Maiden grass) Gracillimus is also likely to self sow too but not as vigorously as chinensis.
This is a perfect example why gardeners should try to avoid using common names and ascertain the botanical names of the plants in their gardens. Though I must admit I have some plants that I inherited or were gifted to me without the botanical name and I cannot be sure of the exact botanical name. But they are still worthy plants to have in the garden.

So either way, the first thing to do is not to let the flower stalks stay on the plant all winter after the seed heads develop. Unfortunately we lose some of our prized winter interest that way though you dont have to cut the entire plant down, just remove the flower stalks. That will prevent new ones from self sowing in the future.

Two... the round up route to get rid of existing plants you do not wish to keep is probably the best option for that. If the main planting's root system is also spreading out of bounds then you need to slice thru the roots at the edge of where you want them to stop and install a metal barrier... a deep trench should be dug and a barrier installed of at least 8 inches deep if not more.
I personally dont really have any trouble with the root spread of my Miscanthus sinensis Gracillimus but I do have it with my M. chinesis.

Sue
'The one thing all gardeners share in common is a belief in tomorrow'

    Bookmark   February 27, 2006 at 12:39PM
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gillespiegardens(Z6 cinti ohio)

I forgot to include Miscanthus sinensis Giganteus which is also sold as M. Floridulus and has a common name of Giant Chinese Silver Grass.

Sue
'The one thing all gardeners share in common is a belief in tomorrow'

    Bookmark   February 27, 2006 at 12:57PM
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donn_(7b-8a)

This is the "Chinese Grass" I was talking about:


Boehmeria nivea

    Bookmark   February 27, 2006 at 1:43PM
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gillespiegardens(Z6 cinti ohio)

Donn:

HOLY COW! makes one wonder how they came up with the common name of chinese grass for that one! I looked it up on the internet and it does say it can reach 4-5 ft tall. Well I guess we need to see what gidget says about all this!!

Sue
'The one thing all gardeners share in common is a belief in tomorrow'

    Bookmark   February 27, 2006 at 4:57PM
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gidget1963

Hi Everyone -- Unfortunately, I don't know what kind of Chinese grass I have but I can try to describe it -- it grows at least 10 feet high and is all green. No flowers. When the frost hits, it turns brown and looks to be a fire hazzard. Over the years, I have tried digging it out as it seems to have a tubular root system, however, it takes quite a bit of effort just getting through it. Once dug out, I have tried planting grass over it, but it comes up through the grass. It's stalks are very tough in that they are even hard to cut through -- sometimes a small chain saw works the best to cut these stalks down. HOpe this description helps. G.

    Bookmark   February 28, 2006 at 2:46PM
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donn_(7b-8a)

Sounds like is actually a grass of some kind. Use the RoundUp technique I suggested earlier. It'll take care of it.

    Bookmark   February 28, 2006 at 3:09PM
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