Avocado - Can we grow it in Georgia?

realshadygardener(8)July 11, 2011

Is anyone growing a avocadoes here in Georgia? If so, please let me know what kind. I was thinking I could handle the dwarf tree and bring it inside for the winter, but I can't find an affordable source. Does anyone know where I can get a 1 gallon starter plant?

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kngskid(Georgia zone 7b)

I ordered a Brogdon Avocado from Plantogram at the beginning of this year and it has done well thus far.

I ordered a 3 gal sized tree to get fruit sooner but Mickey may have smaller ones as well and he throws in a complimentary tree with your order at no additional charge, at least he was doing that back when I placed my order with him.

Here is a link that might be useful: Plant-O-Gram

    Bookmark   July 11, 2011 at 9:53PM
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jay_7bsc(8a)

You can grow _Persea borbonia_, a close relative of the edible avocado, outdoors in Georgia. _Persea borbonia_, the red bay, is native to the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Delaware southward. It's a beautiful, broadleaf evergreen whose leaves can be used in cookery like the familiar bay leaf. There is a beautiful planting of _Persea borbonia_ surrounding UGA's famous Arch on Broad Street in Athens. The fruit of _Persea borbonia_ is dark blue and attractive but too small to be useful as a food source for humans; however, some songbirds enjoy it.

You should be able to grow your own "grocery store" type of avocado very easily. First, buy an avocado or two and remove the seeds. Use about three toothpicks, gently pressed into the outer surface of the avocado pit to suspend the seed, blossom end down, over the surface of water in a regular-sized glass or small jar. The end of the seed should barely touch the water. In a few days, roots should emerge from the avocado pit, followed soon by a growth shoot from the other end of the pit. Pot your plant into a good growing medium when it looks ready for independent living. The "grocery store" avocado requires a frost-free climate to be grown outdoors year round.

    Bookmark   July 15, 2011 at 10:42PM
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jay_7bsc(8a)

You can grow _Persea borbonia_, a close relative of the edible avocado, outdoors in Georgia. _Persea borbonia_, the red bay, is native to the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Delaware southward. It's a beautiful, broadleaf evergreen whose leaves can be used in cookery like the familiar bay leaf. There is a beautiful planting of _Persea borbonia_ surrounding UGA's famous Arch on Broad Street in Athens. The fruit of _Persea borbonia_ is dark blue and attractive but too small to be useful as a food source for humans; however, some songbirds enjoy it.

You should be able to grow your own "grocery store" type of avocado very easily. First, buy an avocado or two and remove the seeds. Use about three toothpicks, gently pressed into the outer surface of the avocado pit to suspend the seed, blossom end down, over the surface of water in a regular-sized glass or small jar. The end of the seed should barely touch the water. In a few days, roots should emerge from the avocado pit, followed soon by a growth shoot from the other end of the pit. Pot your plant into a good growing medium when it looks ready for independent living. The "grocery store" avocado requires a frost-free climate to be grown outdoors year round.

    Bookmark   July 15, 2011 at 10:45PM
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greyghost61(8b SoWeGa)

I have a Brogdon that I am going to plant this spring, there is one in Tallahassee that has been doing well for 40 or so years (so I have been told). I live in the southwestern part of the state and Tally actually gets colder than we do, at least it has for the past few years.

I plan on protecting it its first couple of years in the ground. I have a number of citrus that have done good without any protection these past couple of winters, and they have been rather tough ones, so maybe the brogdon will make it.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 2:46PM
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gusolie

FYI, posters, if you'd like to set your botanical names apart from regular texts on the forums, you can insert basic code scripts.

For example, place botanical name if you'd like the name to be italicized.

Or, place botanical name if you'd like the name to be in bold.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2012 at 8:05PM
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gusolie

FYI, posters, if you'd like to set your botanical names apart from regular texts on the forums, you can insert basic code scripts.

For example, place and "i" in the arrow brackets before the plant's botanical name and a "/i" in the second brackets after the name. It then shows up like this: Quercus palustris.

If you'd like the name to be in bold, insert a "b" inside the first botanical name . In the second arrow brackets, insert "/b". Such as: I really hate Chinese holly that is planted all over new housing developments.

When you input this code in your message, you will see the brackets and i or /i or b and /b, but once you hit "preview" or "submit" the code disappears and all you see is the name in italics or bold.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2012 at 8:12PM
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vroomp(z7Ga)

Thanks for the tip Gusolie.
But, good luck with fruit producing Avocados north of Macon. Most Avocado Trees can't handle frost well but, NO Avocado likes temps below 20�.

    Bookmark   February 13, 2012 at 5:55PM
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el_vato30066(7)

I will give my two cents worth. I have five trees one 4+ years and 4 just started. As for the toothpick thing that is not needed, just put them in a pot of dirt, they grow. Just becareful always as their roots do not like to sit in water or high salts. I planted the four in the fall within a month they sprouted. I have heard that some varieties can tolerate our Ga climate even take a mild freeze down to 10 degrees or so. One person said they planted it near the house and it did excellent, home kept warmer. Have fun, plant many of them as they only have like a 25 % fruiting rate.

    Bookmark   March 23, 2012 at 3:03AM
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