Miscanthus blight?

summer99(7b SC)October 9, 2005

A few months ago I got some Miscanthis Hinjo at Lowes on the bargain rack for $1 each. I was excited b/c I'd heard that this was a shorter, less likely to flop Zebrinus and they were the only ones I've ever seen in my area. Anyway, they looked like they had been watered maybe once in the last month, so they were a little raggedy. They were in one gallon pots and I potted them up into three gallons until I got my new bed ready for them. Well, the beds ready but they're not! They have been growing well, and although I removed most of the brown foliage when I potted them up, I have noticed that lot's of the new foliage has turned brown. It's very rust-like and when I looked it up on-line it appears to be miscanthus blight, but in some cases whole blades are brown!!!! Is there any hope for these plants. If I get them in the ground and cut them back will they be ok next season or do I need to trash them? I would just replace them, but I've never again seen them locally. Thanks for the help!

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AgastacheMan(z7 CA)

If it is miscanthus blight, which I believe its too early to tell, then I would either a- take them out and replace with new specimens, or b. cut them back this late winter, and make sure the soil drains freely. You can apply a foliar fungicide to suppress to spread of the disease, but most of the time it is a waste of money. It is better to get rid of the plant than to pump money into a first year planting. If it is truly miscanthus blight, then remove the plant before spores gestate even further.

    Bookmark   October 9, 2005 at 3:31AM
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dereks(6 Utah)

I had a miscanthus grass with those rust lines and spots all over it. I just cut it down and the next year it was fine.

    Bookmark   October 9, 2005 at 10:33AM
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summer99(7b SC)

I really hope that's the case, dereks. I would replace them but I can't find anymore. Could I cut them down now and treat what's left with a fungicide, or do I need to wait 'till late winter? Here's some pics, they really do look bad.

    Bookmark   October 9, 2005 at 12:39PM
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AgastacheMan(z7 CA)

That is horrible. If you want to go the fungicide path, do not just use a contact spray like Funginex or Neem Oil or the alike....definately go the route of using a systemic fungicide like Banner or Banner-Max....This will contact kill the spores as well as going through the vascular system of the plant, to kill the disease within the plant. It will usually last 2-3 weeks in the plant, but only spray when you have green growth on the plant. No fertilizer, no heavy water, and no top watering the plant. Make sure too that the grass does not get any runoff from herbicides, preemergents, or fumigants. That will definately promote the scars on the plant that you see as well....

    Bookmark   October 9, 2005 at 11:53PM
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pezhead

It also seems possible to me that these plants could be suffering from simple neglect. If they were in a Lowes they -- like grasses I've purchased from big stores -- were undoubtedly neglected, in poor light and either overwatered or not watered. To then take these and transplant them in the middle of the South Carolina summer as they are pushing flower spikes is to stress them about as much as possible. It's no wonder they look pretty ratty. I've had grasses (including some Miscanthus that I transplanted at the wrong time in too much heat) look very close to what i see in the photos. Give them a chance next season! My guess is they will do fine if just left alone til next spring.

I'd just cut them back as ususal next spring and see what happens.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2005 at 10:02AM
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summer99(7b SC)

Thanks for all the help. I'll just cut them back in the spring and maybe spray what's left with some Bayer fungicide I have (it's systemic). I am leaning torward it being simple neglect. They looked bad when I bought them, and though I potted them up into larger pots immediately, they have been residing in my "pot ghetto", which is partially shaded and is a little overcrowded with resulting poor air circulation. Thanks for the encouragement, pez!

    Bookmark   October 10, 2005 at 1:19PM
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summer99(7b SC)

Thanks for all the help. I'll just cut them back in the spring and maybe spray what's left with some Bayer fungicide I have (it's systemic). I am leaning torward it being simple neglect. They looked bad when I bought them, and though I potted them up into larger pots immediately, they have been residing in my "pot ghetto", which is partially shaded and is a little overcrowded with resulting poor air circulation. Thanks for the encouragement, pez!

    Bookmark   October 10, 2005 at 1:21PM
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pezhead

Sure:

I'd go even further and say don't even bother with a systemic in the spring. My guess is that if you provide these grasses with a well drained medium for the winter and shear them and plant them in the spring, they will come up perfectly for you next summer. If they don't...nix them. You'll be able to find 'Hinjo' somewhere if these don't pan out. You could mail order a unique patented banded cultivar called 'Gold Bar' from Joy Creek Nursery. It stays quite small for a banded grass and has many many bars. Their plants are not the cheapest, but they are healthy and the shipping is very good from what I'm told. Since they are just a few miles down the road from me I don't need to have stuff shipped!

    Bookmark   October 11, 2005 at 12:02AM
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AgastacheMan(z7 CA)

lol......I went a little further..........and say don't bother at all......lol..had to say it....had to..lol

    Bookmark   October 11, 2005 at 8:00PM
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pezhead

Agastache man -- you ok down there in Cali? you seem a bit unsteady...

    Bookmark   October 12, 2005 at 4:29PM
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summer99(7b SC)

Wow, Pez, that 'Gold Bar' from Joy Creek looks awesome! Maybe if these goys don't bounce back next season I'll look into ordering some of those. I love that they seem to stay so compact, and the barring is excellent. Thanks for the heads up!

    Bookmark   October 14, 2005 at 10:18AM
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pezhead

Sure. Joy Creek is an excellent nursery and if you're ever in the Portland area (Oregon) you should make sure to tour their gardens.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2005 at 10:45PM
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luvahydrangea(Albany, NY 5)

I had a zebra grass that was perfectly healthy and I decided to move it. Ever since I moved it, its sort of looked like the one you've pictured. I wonder if its just transplant shock or like someone else mentioned, neglect. I'm not doing anything to mine. Hopefully my wait and see style of gardening won't cost me a zebra grass. Good luck with yours!

    Bookmark   October 16, 2005 at 11:51PM
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purpleshovel

Summer 99- Curious how these plants made out. I see this is from way back in 05.
I've had my grasses for years and I think my splitting them so late in the season may have caused this. Hoping if I cut back, wait out the winter that they will come back fine in the spring.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2014 at 12:01PM
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