I could be very confused, but.....

Bethany873(Z6 RI)April 13, 2005

i remember reading someplace that "true" broccoli is purple, and what we typically call broccoli (the green kind) is a relative but is actually something else.....? I think I saw it while browsing through an organic gardening book at B&N. Looking at Baker Creek and Victory seed......they describe thier broccoli as green. Does anyone know of a purple variety of broccoli, or was I obviously distracted while reading that book? I would love to grow it, if it exists. Thank you so much everyone!

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breezyb(z6/7VA)

"Broccoli" encompasses many forms. And there are several varieties of "purple" broccoli (all of which turn green once cooked). Buy 'em & try 'em.

    Bookmark   April 13, 2005 at 11:30AM
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bill_southerncal(10 So.Cal)

Here is a link that gives a brief description on the name origin and other info. Breezyb is right, they all turn green when cooked, just like purple snap beans

http://www.jjdst.com/category_mgmt.cfm?product_id=broccoli

Here is a link that might be useful: Broccoli history

    Bookmark   April 13, 2005 at 11:48AM
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Bethany873(Z6 RI)

thank you so much for the link!

i'm kind of sad they don't stay purple when cooked. interesting information tho

    Bookmark   April 13, 2005 at 12:50PM
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breezyb(z6/7VA)

I am too in a way - although am not sure exactly how appealing "purple" food really would be - lol!!

This year I'm growing a "red" brussels sprout which I believe is supposed to retain it's red color when cooked. Should be interesting - am thinking that mixed with regular green sprouts, it should make a colorful & seasonal addition to the Xmas roast goose.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2005 at 10:38AM
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heirloom_newbie(Z5b Nebraska)

In the Pinetree catalog, they offer a purple cauliflower that retains the purple color when cooked. They also suggest adding a little vinegar after cooking, the catalog says it then turns bright pink/fuscia. We did make sauerkraut out of a purple cabbage, and it turned a bright fuscia -my wife refused to eat it, but the flavor was fine.
So do you think the vinegar would work with beans/broccoli/etc. that are purple, add it before cooking? Not that they would be very tasty with vinegar in them....

    Bookmark   April 28, 2005 at 3:31PM
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heirloom_newbie(Z5b Nebraska)

Forgot to mention, it is not an heirloom or open polinated--rather it is a hybrid, called "Graffiti".

    Bookmark   April 28, 2005 at 3:33PM
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mindsmile(z5 ma.)

the broc history site says-invented broccoli by crossing cauliflower seeds with pea seeds!
Is this possible?
Bill

    Bookmark   April 30, 2005 at 5:20PM
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mistercross(z6b Ozarks)

No, for one thing it contradicts their other statement that "Pliny the Elder (an Italian naturalist and writer) tells us the Romans grew and enjoyed broccoli during the first century." So, not a recent invention.

Also, they are in completely different families. Brassica is in the Mustard family and Pisum is in the Legume family.

Here is a link that might be useful: Some Plant Families

    Bookmark   May 1, 2005 at 4:07AM
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