Roasted Tomato Garlic Soup

SuzyQ2(MNz4)February 12, 2009

I had about 20 - 1 gallon bags filled with tomatoes in my freezer from two summers ago when my garden went wild. Last week my mom & I decided to use those tomatoes to make Katie's Roasted Tomato Garlic Soup (recipe posted many times in the forum).

Can I just say, OMG! We didn't even bother to can the soup as we knew it would be eaten too quickly.

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shirleywny5(5)

I process over 50 pints of the Tomato Garlic soup every summer. I use it in chili, BBQ sauce, stuffed peppers and just plain tomato soup with a grilled cheese sandwich. I'm glad you had luck with it, using frozen tomatoes. It is one of my must have canned items.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 2:56PM
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dgkritch(Z8 OR)

Good stuff, huh? It's one of my "Must Can" items too!
Enjoy!

And thanks again to Katie for sharing!

Deanna

    Bookmark   February 13, 2009 at 12:56PM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

Can someone post her recipe please. I love garlic and don't think I could get too much in a soup. :) I searched for her recipe after reading a post about it and never did find the recipe.

    Bookmark   June 16, 2009 at 1:21AM
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joannaw

gardenpondr, here it is. Found it buried in the "Greatest Hits Recipes for Leesa" thread. Looking forward to trying it myself!

Roasted Tomato Garlic Soup
Recipe By :Katie
12 tomatoes -- *see Note
2 carrots -- cut in 1" pieces
1 large onion -- quartered
2 whole heads garlic -- peeled (or more, to taste)
olive oil
2 cups chicken broth -- (or 3)

1/2 cup chopped fresh basil -- (or 1 Tbsp. dried)
Core tomatoes and cut in half. Place, cut side up, on foil covered cookie sheet with carrots, onion and garlic. Brush with olive oil. Bake at 400F for about an hour, or until vegies are roasted and a little blackened. Place in a large saucepan with the chicken broth and basil and simmer for about 10 minutes. Blend with a stick blender (or in small batches in a blender) until almost smooth. To can: Process in a pressure canner, pints for 60 min. and quarts for 70 min.For dial gauge canners use 11 pounds pressure at 0-2000 ft., 12 lbs. at 2001-4000 ft., 13 lbs. at 4001-6000 ft. and 14 lbs. above 6000 ft. For weighted gauge canners use 10 lbs. pressure at 0-1000 ft., and 15 lbs. over 1000 ft.
*Note: These measurements are approximate...I use whatever it takes to cover the cookie sheet. This makes 1 1/2 to 2 quarts of soup. Cream may be added to taste when the soup is served.

    Bookmark   June 16, 2009 at 7:34AM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

Thank you Joanna!!!

    Bookmark   June 16, 2009 at 5:34PM
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katykelly_gw

It's also good for a pizza sauce.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2009 at 1:26AM
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dian57(M-H Valley NY-5)

Question: my canner holds 7 quart jars. If this recipe makes 1 1/2 to 2 quarts and I want to process 7, do I just quadruple the recipe? Or can I make each batch and refrigerate until I have enough to process?

A question that's been roaming around in my head lately!

    Bookmark   June 18, 2009 at 3:07AM
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jimnginger(9)

Double, triple, quadruple the recipe is great. If you have the cookie sheets to roast the tomatoes, and you are sure you would like this recipe, make enough for a full load in your caner. It costs just as much to process 7 quarts as it does 2 quarts. If doing pint jars, I always try to plan on doing a double layer in my caner. I would do a short load IF you want to know what something might taste like and you are not sure you would like it. Hope this helps - Jim in So. Calif.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2009 at 5:14AM
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shirleywny5(5)

I do triple batches all the time. While subsequent batches are roasting, I'm blending, adding broth and spices and heating the first batch. My canner holds 10 pint jars.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2009 at 7:30AM
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joy_unspeakable(7NC)

It also freezes very nicely. I did not want to can just two jars last year (and I didn't know how well I would like it) so I froze it. This year it is on my 'make more of' list. Delicious! As already said above, great as soup, spaghetti sauce, etc, etc.

Happy Canning!
~ Tracy

    Bookmark   June 18, 2009 at 9:49AM
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mom2wildboys(RI zone6)

I preferred the flavor of the soup after having been frozen than after canning. I think the flavor of the basil was negatively affected by the canning (at least, to my tastes). However, it could've just been a difference in the flavor of the tomatoes from one year to the next. Regardless, I think this year I will can the soup minus the basil, freeze some chopped basil in oil, and stir in a little bit of the frozen basil when reheating. Just another option!

    Bookmark   June 21, 2009 at 9:50AM
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ksrogers(EasternMass Z6)

Basil once cooked does seem to change its taste. They still add a leaf or two to commmercial canned tomatoes.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2009 at 3:33PM
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ccaggiano

I am going to try this recipe today. I plan on freezing it since I don't have a pressure cooker. But I am curious... is this recipe even safe for canning?

My experience is limited (2nd year just using recipes with a bwb), so please don't get offended. But there are three things that seem questionable to me. If I am wrong, I would love to know why so I can learn.

First, I would question the use of the chicken broth, which is pretty fatty. There is also the use of oil on the veggies before roasting. Would that make a difference? Aren't fats a big no no with canning?

Second, aren't onions, carrots and garlic low acid foods? And therefore wouldn't you need to add additional acid?

Lastly, the directions are vague in terms of quantities of each ingredient. Shouldn't the measurements be more precise such as cups or weights?

Thanks guys!!

P.S. and Dave - aren't you proud of me?? I added to a thread instead of starting a new one :-)

    Bookmark   July 21, 2009 at 2:07PM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

LOL yeah we live and learn don't we CCaggiano? :) With this forum there is only so many pages they allow and when that certain amount of pages are posted then others fall off into never never land never to be seen again. I just WISH there could be some sticky posts that would stay. I think it's like this with all of the garden web threads though.

    Bookmark   July 21, 2009 at 3:28PM
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ksrogers(EasternMass Z6)

Yes, the more new threads posted, the more old ones get dumped. If it were 5 years ago, they would have only been around for maybe a year at best as the forums were much smaller in total size and contained smaller amounts of posts in each thread. Using the search feature and posting again within the older threads and same topics will bring them back up to page one again. This can help to save some from eventual dropping off forever.

    Bookmark   July 21, 2009 at 3:33PM
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ccaggiano

Thanks for the responses - I do get what you are saying about threads falling off. But what about my question about the soup?? :-)

    Bookmark   July 21, 2009 at 3:42PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

You concerns are calid for doing things in BWB but this is a pressure canned recipe and many things that aren't allowed with BWB processing are quite safe with pressure canning.

First, I would question the use of the chicken broth, which is pretty fatty. There is also the use of oil on the veggies before roasting. Would that make a difference? Aren't fats a big no no with canning?

The chicken broth is defatted just as if one would make stock following the approved recipe for it. Oil is allowed in small amounts in several tested recipes when they will be pressure canned. In this case the oil is removed with the skins.

Second, aren't onions, carrots and garlic low acid foods? And therefore wouldn't you need to add additional acid?

Pressure canned recipes seldom contain added acids. It is the processing that kills botulism in low acid pressure canned recipes, not added acid.

Lastly, the directions are vague in terms of quantities of each ingredient. Shouldn't the measurements be more precise such as cups or weights?

You'll find many of the older canning recipes like this one are given in amounts rather than in cups or weights. Many are only just now being converted to actual measurements.

I believe that a conversion was posted here somewhere on this particular one at one time but since you are freezing it it wouldn't make much difference. Still there are conversion charts available on the web that can convert the numbered amounts to average # cups for you if you wish.

Dave

PS: yes, thanks! ;)

    Bookmark   July 21, 2009 at 4:04PM
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ccaggiano

Thanks - that cleared up a a lot!!

    Bookmark   July 21, 2009 at 4:11PM
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junelynn(7NC)

I made the soup for the first time last night. I assume it's OK that I used canned chicken stock that I made earlier this year. From the recipe and 3 equivalent cans of chicken stock (2 pints), I got 4 pints of soup. I wanted to see how good it was first, from all the forums.
My question is:
After using the "motor boat" (Emeril calls it that) or the stick blender, it still seemed slushy. I have a BRAUN stick blender that has an adjustable speed. I strained it, then blended it separately. It was still a bit slushy w. small tomato peels and little pieces of onion, garlic, etc. The tomato skins were the most bothersome. Is that they way it's supposed to be? Do you peel the tomatoes before you roast them? Or after? I did add the slush back in. I just had too much of it to discard.
Also, how much canning depth do you leave? I left 1 inch of head space as that seems what BALL BLUE BOOK recommends for soups.
We newbie need details. It does taste like something you would get from a gourmet restuarant! Very good!
Thanks for your answers!!
June Lynn

    Bookmark   July 22, 2009 at 7:21AM
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joy_unspeakable(7NC)

June Lynn - I peeled my tomatoes after roasting. The skins just slipped right off (and as said above, I think that helps to remove some of the oil). Mine was 'slushy' too - or I'd say mine was a little chunky - lots of bits of carrots and onions. But I froze mine, so was no concerned with getting it smooth. I suppose you could blend in a blender or puree if you wanted a smoother consistency.

Sorry, can't help with the PC questions as I have only froze mine (which worked really well).

~ Tracy

    Bookmark   July 22, 2009 at 11:23AM
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ccaggiano

My first batch came out pretty good but it was just a little too garlicky for me. There can be quite a bit of size difference between heads of garlic so keep that in mind when making this.

I roasted mine in a baking dish - not a cookie sheet. There was a good inch of water in the dish when the tomatoes were done. I shudder to think what my oven would have looked like if I used a cookie sheet!! Also, I ended up adding that water to the pot to dilute it and offset the garlicky taste.

I froze mine so I can't help with the pressure canning questions.

As far as the "slushy-ness" of the mix, I found that the consistency of my batch was similar to a can of condensed soup. I added some cream when re-heating and it was a perfect bowl of cream of garlicky tomato soup. I think it is stated above that if you are going to add cream, do it before you are going to use it - not before pressure canning.

    Bookmark   July 22, 2009 at 12:34PM
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joe-il(5)

Made some tonight and this is pretty darn good. I baked it on a jelly roll pan, not watery, I guess that depends on how watery your toms are. After cooking I pureed it in my blender that can puree a brick I was able to do it all at once. I used 14 oz can of broth, heated then added puree. It did come out "slushy" Just change the name to tomato bisque is all lol. I didnt have basil. I added salt and pepper to taste and a 1/4 tsp of dry ground chipolte. Warms it up and gives it a little smokey zest. Will be great when the snow is falling but to do that I will have to make more because my wife just ate it all. cripes!

    Bookmark   August 19, 2009 at 9:08PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

bump to save Katie C's recipe

    Bookmark   January 8, 2011 at 7:57PM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

When you all pressure can soups or anything else, how do you keep your other jars while one canner is pressure canning? Do you just wait to fill the second batch of jars or do you go ahead and fill all the jars and just let them sit out while the others are pressure canning. I have a soup recipe and it makes 23 quarts so that would be 4 canners and as you know that would have some of the jars sitting out for over 4 hours on the cabinet. Wondering how to go about doing this batch? Thank you!!!

    Bookmark   September 18, 2011 at 11:29PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Do you just wait to fill the second batch of jars

Exactly. You never fill the jars until they are ready to go into the canner. When ready to fill the second set of jars, reheat the soup in the pot to boiling and then fill those jars and put them in the canner.

Dave

    Bookmark   September 19, 2011 at 6:05PM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

Thanx Dave!

    Bookmark   September 19, 2011 at 9:04PM
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kat0412

I hope this thread isn't too old to respond to... I need some help here. I made this tomato soup, and followed the directions. When I pressure canned it, I lost about 3" of soup from each quart! Not having canned tomato soup before, I'm not sure if this is something anyone else has run into. I left the specified 1" of head space, so I don't know why this happened. Maybe the soup was too thick? At any rate, my question is whether or not it's safe to eat. The jars have good seals, and the only thing that appears to be wrong is that the level isn't up to the top any longer. I'd hate to waste all the ingredients and time, but I also don't want have to eat tomato soup for the next 6 weeks either... Any ideas??

    Bookmark   February 25, 2013 at 12:25AM
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readinglady(z8 OR)

If the jars have a good seal then there's no problem (except of course it's frustrating to look at them lined up on the shelf, seeing the reduction).

If the water in the canner was not clear and had tomato residue, then you experienced siphoning from the jars.

The chart at the link provides several possible causes. See if you can identify the reason in your own case. Come back if you have additional questions or search the forums. There are lots of threads on this topic.

Carol

Here is a link that might be useful: Causes and Solutions for Canning Problems

    Bookmark   February 25, 2013 at 2:30PM
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cristywisty

I would like to make diced roasted tomatoes with onions and garlic. Could I remove the carrots, chicken stock and herbs? Do I need to add more onion and garlic to make up for the carrots? I would like to pack them with out any added liquid other than the natural liquids/juice from the tomatoes, is that possible? Thanks!

    Bookmark   September 13, 2013 at 9:50PM
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pattypan(z6b CT)

hello, dave, you mentioned above (july '09) that some oil is removed with the skins. the posted recipe omits that point. also it says to place tomatoes cut side up, that means the flesh is brushed with oil, not the skins. i was thinking of brushing just the other veggies with oil, or covering with parchment paper, to lower the amount of oil. usually i leave the skins in...any worries??
anyway, i'm glad to find a recipe with so much garlic ! and am i glad i now have a presto16 qt. PC !

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 8:35AM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Posted by joannaw 6 (My Page) on Tue, Jun 16, 09 at 7:34
.................................
For weighted gauge canners use 10 lbs. pressure at 0-1000 ft., and 15 lbs. over 1000 ft.

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Which authority has said that ? I LIKE TO KNOW.

With weight system , the internal pressure does not change substantially, to merit using different weights at different altitude. It is negligible. That is the beauty of weight system.
You might need different weight/pressure for processing different foods but not for change in altitude.

Example:
A given weight produces 15 psi internal pressure at sea level.
How much internal pressure will it produce in an altitude where atmospheric pressure is 9.5 psi (~ 10,000 ft.)
ANSWER: 14.65 psi.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 9:37AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Seysonn - the need to adjust weights for various altitudes is common knowledge and has always been that way. One need only look at most any pressure canning recipe.

The "authority" is USDA and NCHFP and Ball and any pressure canner manual. They all list such adjustments in detail, if not attached to the particular recipe then in a table in the book or on the site.

The weight requirements for this particular recipe are no different than those for many other recipes that are pressure canned.

Dave

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 11:54AM
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sharonann1

seysonn's question reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of pressure canning. The goal of pressure canning is to achieve a specific temperature, not a specific pressure, within the canner for a specific time period (which has been tested for the specific food being canned) In pressure canning, the goal temperature is higher than 212 F, the boiling point of water at sea level, in order to kill botulinum spores among other baddies.

The boiling point of water at higher altitude is already reduced due to the decreased atmospheric pressure. Thus, the water in the canner will boil at a lower temperature at elevation, and though the canner is full of steam and pressurized to a specific psi (or close to that psi of a canner at sea level), the temperature inside the canner will be lower at elevation if the same canning wieght is used at altitude and at sea level.

As it is temperature, not a given pressure, that has been tested to ensure canning safety, the canner at elevation must achieve the same internal temperature for the same time period as the canner at sea level for a given recipe to be safe. The only way to to raise the temperature of the steam inside the canner at elevation is to increase the pressure inside the canner to compensate for the decreased atmospheric pressure at altitude. Thus, the need to have the larger weights at altitude.

In this way, the temperature inside a canner at sea level and at altitude will be equivalent, enabling the use of the same recipes and time requirements at sea level and at elevation.

Here is a link that might be useful: Understanding boiling point at altitude

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 1:39PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

The pressure adjustment only required when one uses a dial gauge of diaphragm type where the reading is affected by the atmospheric pressure. With the weight system the effect on the weight sitting on the vent hole and ultimatelt the internal pressure is negligible . The body of the vessel itself, being rigid body, is not affected by the changes in atmospheric pressure.
Atmospheric pressure is only some additional force acting on top of the weight and it is proportional to the cross sectional area of the vent hole. And that being in the magnitude of about 0.01 to 0.02 square inches, makes negligible difference.
I am contacting USDA on clarification.
I will let you know of their answer.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 7:15PM
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pattypan(z6b CT)

this is fascinating ! please do pass on USDA's response.
and i thought i didn't like physics ( is this physics ?)

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 7:24PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

The pressure adjustment only required when one uses a dial gauge of diaphragm type where the reading is affected by the atmospheric pressure. With the weight system the effect on the weight sitting on the vent hole and ultimatelt the internal pressure is negligible . The body of the vessel itself, being rigid body, is not affected by the changes in atmospheric pressure.

You are missing the whole point. Have you looked at any of the pressure canning charts that detail the differences for altitude between gauge canners and weighted canners? It really is quite simple. Do you understand the difference between gauge canners and weighted canners? I have to ask as you have often said you don't do much pressure canning.

Gauge canners allow for a whole range of various pressures to be used - anything from 0 to 15 lbs. That is why a range of useable pressures is given for many foods based on altitude.

Weight canners only allow for 5-10-or 15 lbs. That is how the weights are made. there are no 12 lb, 13, or 14 lb weights. So when using a weighed canner and you live above 1000' (2000' with some foods) feet you have to use 15 lb.

The instructions for this recipe are typical. There is no need to turn it into some convoluted complex discussion about physics.

Dave

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 7:58PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Dave, I am strictly talking about the pressure canner/cooker with weight system, not gauge. I know it well that diaphragm type gauges will show higher numbers at high altitudes, because the gauge is affected by the atmospheric pressure.

Pattypan, yes this is physics.
I'll wait for the USDA response.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 10:50PM
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2ajsmama

We went through this 11 months ago...

When the USDA (NCHFP? Who did you contact?) comes back and says the same thing sharonann and I did about boiling point, temperature, weights and pressure, will you believe them?

    Bookmark   September 1, 2014 at 11:00PM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

I haven't made this yet but have some heirloom tomatoes growing right now so I HOPE I can get enough from them to make this with! Making me some notes now on just how to do it. Thank you all again for the info!!!

    Bookmark   October 6, 2014 at 11:11PM
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gardnpondr(Zone 8)

Well I finally got to make it and it was so good it didn't get a chance to get canned. lol I made it like 3 times last fall and this will also be canned this summer because we dearly love this stuff!!!!

    Bookmark   March 8, 2015 at 8:53PM
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