Looking for cuttings

earthworm73(WA z8)May 8, 2013

New here to growing hibiscuses. I am looking for more "tropical" looking cuttings from hibiscuses to start. I already have a couple Rose of Sharons but want something more interesting. It's too late for me to start from seeds so hoping someone generous can provide a few cuttings. I do like the Hawaiian type ones and the like (Lord Baltimore I am originally from Baltimore, Texas Rose, etc).

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Gutzmek(6)

Earthworm73,
Are you looking to plant these in the ground or keep in pots? Hib R-S will not survive a winter in you zone. If your looking for more robust varieties, there are several individuals here that can provide.
Ed

    Bookmark   May 8, 2013 at 8:57PM
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earthworm73(WA z8)

Gutzmek yes I am looking to out some in the ground. Sorry I don't know what hib-R-S mean. I know most is not all of the tropical type of hibiscuses won't survive my zone 8b/9a so I was hoping the cutting would get me through this season until I could obtain some seeds to start next season.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 4:50PM
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Gutzmek(6)

Earthworm73,
Hibiscus Rosa- Sinensis are the typical 'tropical/exotic/cajun' varieties. These plants require a tropical environment to succeed. Their ancestors come from many equatorial environments. Because of this, these new hybrids or cultivars (CVs) require similar needs. Think volcanic islands like Hawaii. They have shallower roots with good drainage, enjoy humidity, warmth and sunlight. They also require more specific fertilizers. Potassium ie potash can generate better blooms. Propagation of these is a bit more involved. With some, cuttings do not take and others require grafting to reproduce. Many times pollination will create new varieties containing different traits.
Now, with all this aside, it sounds like you are looking for other Hibiscus. These would include Hibiscus Moscheutoes, Hibiscus Mutabilis, or even Hibiscus Militaris. These plants are hardier and die back each year. The unfortunate piece is the colors are simpler. These plants to not have the vivid multi-colored blooms that H. R-S does. The advantage is the huge size of the flowers, their resilience, and often times a very unique leaf pattern. My H. Moscheutoes 'Midnight Marvel', has these huge maple/MJ leaves that change colors like trees in fall. The bloom is a large simple red, but the leaf colors are very unique.
FYI- If you are looking for cuttings of these later plants be careful. Many have patents making propagation illegal.
Hope this helps. I know its a lot.
Ed

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 9:03PM
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earthworm73(WA z8)

Okay then that's what I want. Anything more exotic looking than Rose of Sharon.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2013 at 9:20AM
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wally_1936(8b)

Not all Rose of Sharon are uninteresting.

    Bookmark   May 16, 2013 at 1:02AM
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Gutzmek(6)

Agreed.
Ed

    Bookmark   May 16, 2013 at 8:09PM
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earthworm73(WA z8)

Wally what kind of ROS is that? Pretty nice looking.

The purple one at the bottom is the kind I saw in plenty of yards growing up. Those back then those things were huge like small trees.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2013 at 9:04AM
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wally_1936(8b)

I have no idea it was a gift from another gardenweb.com contributor.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2013 at 10:12AM
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earthworm73(WA z8)

Nice gift.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2013 at 5:44PM
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wally_1936(8b)

If they ever get large enough to bloom I will post again. The purple ones as well as the red and white or just white are usually hardy as far north as Michigan and West Virginia depending on variety. All those

I have seen in Michigan and West Virginia were large bushes.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2013 at 10:52AM
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Tarzan57

I agree with the others posting about the desirability of some of the Rose of Sharons (Hibiscus syriacus). The USDA-developed variety 'Diana' rivals the tropical rosa-sinensis types in beauty. The almost 4" flowers are pure white, quite flat with partially overlapping petals and are produced in abundance. They flower continuously from late June until frost here in Northeast TN. They open fully even on cloudy or rainy days. Best of all is they produce no seeds so you don't end up with a forest of seedlings like with the older varieties. They should be quite hardy into Zone 5. Mine has become a beautiful rounded specimen that's about 8'-9' tall and as wide and I never have to prune it to maintain shape.

Here is a link that might be useful:

    Bookmark   June 23, 2013 at 6:13PM
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Gutzmek(6)

My two RoS (H. Syriacus) are Blue Bird and Blue Satin. The picture is Blue Satin.
Ed

    Bookmark   June 23, 2013 at 10:19PM
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