Canning Tomatoes

missemerald(7 (Virginia))April 17, 2013

I keep running into recipes that call for a can or two of diced tomatoes. All the yummy ones that I canned last year are crushed (or made into other things, such as pasta sauce or salsa) but I was wondering, is it possible to can "diced" tomatoes and still have them come out of the jar somewhat like the diced ones in the cans? If so, how? My Ball Book talks about whole, halves and quarters, not diced. Thanks.

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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Crushed is about as close to diced as i think you can get .Pre-canned diced just turn to mush.

But you may can them in whole or halves and then dice after opening. That's what we do to get the firmer diced appearance.

Dave

    Bookmark   April 17, 2013 at 10:37PM
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Linda_Lou(SW Wa.)

Store canned have calcium chloride aka Pickle Crisp to us home preservers. If you want you could sure add some to your home canned ones before processing.
That is how theirs stay in diced pieces.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2013 at 12:57PM
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kriswrite(zone 8)

I can halved tomatoes. Then I can crush or dice or chop them for whatever recipe I'm cooking that day.

    Bookmark   April 21, 2013 at 7:53PM
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wertach zone 7-B SC

I'm a lazy canner, so I try to do it the easiest way. LOL

I poke a whole in the tomatoes and put them in my electric pressure cooker for 2 minutes, no water. Then I wait about 5 minutes and let off the steam.

After they cool down enough to handle, the skin slips right off and they are still firm. I core them and drop them in my jars whole with some Pickle Crisp, cover with the juice and can them in my big PC.

They stay pretty firm.

    Bookmark   April 23, 2013 at 12:35PM
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donna_h(Zone 4-b)

@wertach: How much Pickle Crisp do you use per quart and how long do you process in the PC?

I really can't enjoy canned tomatoes because they are just MUSH when I open them :(

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 11:05AM
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wertach zone 7-B SC

I use 1/8 teaspoon per quart and process for 15 minutes. 25 minutes is recommended for raw pack but they are partially cooked.

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 11:17AM
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donna_h(Zone 4-b)

Thank you! And 15 mins should be quite sufficient due to pre-cooking. Maybe there's hope for my poor tomatoes :).

Thanks again!!!!

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 11:29AM
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donna_h(Zone 4-b)

@wertach: OK...one more question. Do you add salt and/or lemon juice when using the Pickle Crisp. (Can you tell I don't can pickles and therefore have NO knowledge of this product?)

Thank you for your help!

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 11:34AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

1) There are no approved provisions for reducing processing times just to try to keep them more firm. And pre-cooking plays no role in determining required processing times. Make up your own processing times at your own risk.

2) Adding Pickle Crisp has nothing to do with the need to add lemon juice or citric acid. One or the other is still required. Salt is optional.

Dave

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 4:06PM
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wertach zone 7-B SC

As Dave said "And pre-cooking plays no role in determining required processing times. Make up your own processing times at your own risk."

Dave is an expert and if I were you I would follow his instructions before mine!

Dave has helped me many times!

It is a risk that I am willing to take. That is why I included "25 minutes is recommended for raw pack" I'm not recommending that you do what I do!

Yes, I add lemon juice, no salt.

Dave don't take this in the wrong way. I just want to point something out. I have high regards for you and your advise!

I am prone to doing things that my family taught me when I was growing up. Before the Government spent Billions of $ to make us safe from ourselves.

I look back over the years and remember that no one ever got sick or died from our preservation processes. Good luck maybe?

Or maybe it was because we ran barefoot all summer, ate dirt on a carrot that we pulled up and just brushed off for a garden snack? We never washed our above ground veggies when we pulled them from our garden.

Maybe all of the safe practices are making us more vulnerable?

A little twist on "Don't do as I do, do what I say". "Don't do as I do or do what I say unless you want to take a risk"!!!!!!

I'm no expert, like Dave. So please follow his advice!

    Bookmark   April 30, 2013 at 3:06PM
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4squaregardener(7)

now a days we live and work in near sterile conditions. We are very attuned with cleanliness and hygiene. Which is not necessarily a bad thing. But in doing so, we have taken our bodies defences to the lowest common denominator. We have become germ-phobes.

I remember many a time drinking from the garden hose, eating straight from the garden. All those micro-organisms did not kill me. I have eaten things on a DARE in my younger days, that I probably shouldn't have, but am still here to talk about it. lol.. (just the thought makes my mouth water in anticipation of vomiting.)

Be responsible for yourself. If you choose to eat or can something that the Feds don't agree with, remember they are here to protect you. (smirk)

This is a great place to find answers. However, the Dept of Agriculture will give you the best answers on what the Fed's believe is the safest thing for you. (they care, truly they do) "another smirk"

remember, they have approved Montesano. Tell me that they haven't figured out a way to increase the amount of dietary allergies and sensitivities, so that our children are born with immunity deficiencies. All that require substantial medical intervention.

Its BIG business, the federal government is one of the biggest businesses around.

Isn't this a reason why many of us can? To be responsible for what we put in our bodies? What we choose to feed our families. I am not advocating irresponsible behavior concerning home canning endeavors.

Be aware of the processing times and rules. If you have information that you trust, then use it.

As you can tell I am pretty passionate about this subject. I tend to get a little cranky when rules get shoved down my throat. I am one of those people who play by the rules as they apply to me.

I respect personal freedom. Especially my own.

This post was edited by 4squaregardener on Wed, May 1, 13 at 13:16

    Bookmark   May 1, 2013 at 1:04PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

I don't worry about germs. It would be difficult to prove that any gardener has "taken our bodies defences [sic]to the lowest common denominator [sic]" since we play in the dirt all day.

I am somewhat concerned however about the risk of botulism since it can be fatal. Since that, not germs, is what the guidelines are directed toward preventing I recommend following the guidelines.

Drinking out of the garden hose and eating straight from the garden can't give you botulism. Canning can. So you can "smirk" all you want at the source of the guidelines (which isn't the government, it is NCHFP*) or Monsanto (whatever that has to do with it) or big business but none of them have anything to do with canning foods safely.

NCHFP was founded in 2000 as a multi-institutional effort with The University of Georgia and Alabama A&M University as the primary institutions. Expert scientists in home food preservation from industry and eight other U.S. universities comprised an advisory committee for the Center.

One can distrust the government, monsanto, and big business all they wish but as Mama used to say "don't cut off your nose to spite your face".

Dave

    Bookmark   May 1, 2013 at 2:23PM
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4squaregardener(7)

"The National Center for Home Food Processing and Preservation was established with funding from the Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES-USDA) in 2000 as a multi-institutional effort with The University of Georgia and Alabama A&M University as the primary institutions. Expert scientists in home food preservation from industry and eight other U.S. universities comprised an advisory committee for the Center. Home food preservation recommendations were updated through laboratory development and testing of products and critical literature reviews; recommendations from USDA and the Cooperative Extension System have been made available through this website; a new video series; on online self-study course; revision of the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning (December 2009); updating of Extension professionals in various states; and, various other publications on the website." as taken directly from their website.

The NCHFP was directly funded by the USDA and played a major role in updating the government quide lines for home canning.

My comments were directed at how the government becomes involved in everything. And to think careful for yourself. Who or what you are willing to trust with your health.

Who's decision is it ultimately?

Smirking Absolutely.

Noses... mine is quite good looking, and I prefer to not to have others in my business. but thank you for being concerned.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2013 at 8:06PM
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