cuttings for propagation

jalfred(z7 MS)August 30, 2006

Is it too late to take cuttings from hardy Hibiscus for propagation, and how long should they be covered with plastic?

Thanks

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mstrainer

I do not believe it is too late. I contine to research this method of propogation. When you take the cutting, cut at a 45 degree angle right below a leaf node (where a leaf meets the stem). Remove most of the leaves except for some near the top of the cutting.

Scrape off the bottom inch of bark (I used my fingernail) and dip the cutting in a root hormone. Then plant in a rooting medium such as 2 parts Perlite to 1 part peat moss. The plants should root in 6 to 8 weeks. Keep covered with plastic for that time--then gradually expose the plants to air.

Here in Zone 5 where I am, it will be too late to plant my cuttings outdoors, so I am going to try and keep them alive inside this winter. Good luck.

    Bookmark   September 6, 2006 at 7:40PM
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rosarama

Don't be discouraged if they take a long time to root. I have made cuttings and stuck them in a potting mix for 3 months at a time. As long as they remain green, they will root. I was surprised at how trouble-free the process was. Good luck!!

    Bookmark   September 11, 2006 at 9:38PM
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joyce_2006_grow

A friend gave me a piece of hibiscus. She pulled it up with some root on it. I planted it but I'm wondering what are my chances that it will continue to grow. This was about 6 days ago. Some of the lower leaves have turned yellow. It had a bloom that has since opened. Will this work or do I need to do cuttings? What care should I give it to help it along? I live in Ky. so I know I will need to protect it this winter.

    Bookmark   September 13, 2006 at 8:24PM
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jalfred(z7 MS)

It looks like 2 of my 12 cuttings, started Aug 7, have made it. These two are especially healthy with several new green leaves, and their blooms will be double pinks. I lost two for sure, and the other 8 look pretty good, as they are not dead, and definately show promise. My quandary is that I will be househunting in Arkansas and Mississippi, and these babies will have to thrive in the motel room. I am hoping for the best. I will be taking a huge red blooming Moscheutos with me also, and a pale peach blooming something which I thought was also a Mos. Hoping for the best! thanks, everyone!

    Bookmark   September 30, 2006 at 8:59PM
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carygardener(7b)

Hardy Hibiscus cuttings seem to have a pretty good survival rate. I took a few cuttings and stuck them in regular clay soil in my garden which remains constantly moist and most of them are still alive after 7 weeks..some are actually growing. I guess porus, moist soil and warm temperature is the key. Temperature near 80 seems ideal.

    Bookmark   October 4, 2006 at 8:50AM
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birdsnblooms

Joyce, whenever one roots a plant, the cutting should be without flower..all energy is spent on the flower..so it's best to take a cutting from a stem that doesn't have a flower, or if all do, then remove the flower. Toni

    Bookmark   October 18, 2006 at 4:38PM
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