Looking dead

loridillonSeptember 25, 2006

Hi, about two weeks ago I planted a hedge of Hibisus that are suppose to be year round. However after about one week they started to look very droopy and the leaves are turning yellow. Help I do not want them to die on me. Any suggestions. Thank you, Lori

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jean001(z8aPortland, OR)

Some history about what you've done would help us help you.

A common problem this early on is that the original rootball is dry. Drying such as that can occur in spite of rain and even if you watered them.

The water must be directed onto the rootball and must be applied slow enough to soak in.

    Bookmark   September 26, 2006 at 1:33AM
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loridillon

When I bought them they were green and leaves all looked great. I got them home some leaves looked a little wind burnt. I planted them in holes that I dug some I used mircle grow potting soil and some I just used bagged top soil to plant them in the holes. I then watered each plant at the base so that the water would seep in. And then I have watered about every other day with a sprinkler. Not sure how much water they should get because on the tags it said medium water and everything I read online says that they like alot of water. So confussed....

    Bookmark   September 26, 2006 at 9:36AM
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jardinerowa

I'm in zone 8a and my hibiscuses are going dormant for the winter. I don't know what kind of hibiscus you have. Is it Rose of Sharon (h. syriacus), hardy hibiscus (h. moscheutos) or tropical hibiscus (h. rosa sinensis).

The latter is strictly a houseplant in your area unless you are in RGV. They do great in the summer outside though. Rose of Sharon is a deciduous shrub and mine is starting its leaves but should return next year with leaf growth and buds. Hardy hibiscus is an herbaceous perennial with large flowers. The whole plant dies to the ground and then comes back next year if freezing is not too severe.

I hope some of this has helped you.

    Bookmark   September 26, 2006 at 6:56PM
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loridillon

I forget what its called I do believe I read on the tag that it was suppose to be an evergreen. Its blooms that I have seen are a large flower.

    Bookmark   September 26, 2006 at 8:59PM
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tcharles26(usa texas)

If it is 'supposed to be an evergreen' then it's tropical. H rosa sinensis. The species is a tropical shrub. Having said that, it doesn't matter what the natural life cycle of the plant is if you're growing it in a different climate.

TRopical hibs can be somewhat 'evergreen' in some but not all parts of texas, relatively few actually. What part of the state do you live in? Most places in texas they can be treated like herbaceous perenialls. (like here in San Antonio) Some other places they are annuals unless you protect them.

    Bookmark   September 27, 2006 at 12:20AM
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loridillon

I am in North Texas by the metroplex. How would you protect them?

    Bookmark   September 27, 2006 at 8:10AM
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west_texas_peg(8a West Cen TX)

I'm hoping someone will answer how you protect them. I purchased one recently at a nursery fall sale for 50% off.

I put it in the ground, had some yellow leaves at first but now it is blooming like crazy with no yellow leaves. It has partial sun at times of the day, full sun later in the day, is by the birdbath so it gets a drink each time I fill the birdbath.

Can I mulch it good and cover with a 5gal plastic bucket this winter? Will it survive in the ground?

Peggy

    Bookmark   September 29, 2006 at 2:17PM
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rjj1(Norman OK Zone7)

How often and how long does it freeze where both of you live?

If it stays below freezing for a number of hours where the soil freezes, it's probably not going to make it. My mother in law used to live in Ft. Worth and all her tropicals were in pots. The one exception were sago palms that could handle a cold snap down into the 20's for a time.

randy

    Bookmark   September 29, 2006 at 5:30PM
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loridillon

Well thats not a good thing. I am a little upset that the tags that come on the plant didn't specify that it has to remain a warm temp to keep the plant alive. The tag just said that it was an evergreen. Which I assumed ment that it would live. I have spent alot on these plants since I bought 36 of them to line the one side of my property with. A little disappointed. :(

    Bookmark   September 29, 2006 at 6:24PM
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rjj1(Norman OK Zone7)

I would double check the tag to make sure there is no reference on it as to USDA growing zone or tropical. If those two things are missing, a discussion with the greenhouse that sold them is in order.

Sorry to hear that.

randy

    Bookmark   September 30, 2006 at 12:28PM
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