Difference between 'fridge Pickles and Regular

uaskigyrl(7)July 14, 2011

Hello!

I'm quite new to canning but I have been a very active canner so far (I've put up about 100 jars since May - which is a lot considering it's just little ol' me) and as one knows, there are refridgerator pickles and then regular pickles.

I'm wondering what the difference is between a refridgerator pickle and a regular canned pickle? What's stopping me from just boiling water bath a recipe that is a fridge pickle?

(I haven't done it, so don't worry, I'm just curious as to the difference!)

Thanks,

uaskigyrl

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Linda_Lou(SW Wa.)

Most times a refrigerator pickle has a weaker brine, not strong enough to be used to process for safety reasons.
With the refrigerator pickles a person needs to be sure they are using a current, up to date recipe and method. Some of the older ones can allow listeria to grow.
The ones that are not recommended will say to let sit at room temp. for a couple days, then put in the fridge. There is not enough acid in these to keep them safe, even in the fridge. Listeria can grow in the fridge.
The others are fresh pack pickles and have a brine that will be at least half 5 % acidity vinegar to water ratio.
There are also fully fermented pickles, like you would ferment sauerkraut.
The quick pack are the fastest to make and those are the type my family likes.

    Bookmark   July 14, 2011 at 12:44PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

What's stopping me from just boiling water bath a recipe that is a fridge pickle?

There are exceptions of course but usually fridge pickle recipes are make-and-eat recipes and aren't intended for long-time fridge storage much less acidic enough for shelf storage.

Dave

    Bookmark   July 14, 2011 at 2:29PM
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btbarbara(7b/8a)

Like the others said, my understanding is that "fridge" or "freezer" recipes aren't actually processed in the canner so they have to be kept in the fridge or freezer and won't keep as long. Whereas canned recipes can be kept on the shelf long-term without requiring refrigeration. I have a glass-top stove and don't have smooth-bottom stockpot big enough to boil the jars so I have to stick with the "fridge" recipes for now. :(

    Bookmark   July 16, 2011 at 3:01PM
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chartim(7A)

I would like to have a quick pack recipe but can't find one in search, could someone help please?
Tim

    Bookmark   July 17, 2011 at 11:18AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Both the Ball Blue Book and NCHFP have several. I linked one Dill one below.

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: NCHFP - Quick Pack Dill Pickles

    Bookmark   July 17, 2011 at 11:36AM
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chartim(7A)

Thanks Dave

    Bookmark   July 17, 2011 at 12:16PM
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Linda_Lou(SW Wa.)

I use the Heinz dill pickle recipe. It should come up in a search.

    Bookmark   July 17, 2011 at 12:55PM
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hcoon(5a)

In that pickle recipe, what is a "head of fresh dill"?

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 12:00AM
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Linda_Lou(SW Wa.)

One of the big flower type parts on top of fresh dill.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 12:58PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Pictures of heads of dill.

Here is a link that might be useful: Head of dill pictures

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 1:21PM
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hcoon(5a)

Awesome! Thanks -- it's what I thought, but got different information on another site. My dill has those heads, so I'm all set!

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 9:35PM
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terrybull

dave why does that recipe say to leave a 1/4 inch of the stem? is it a handle?

    Bookmark   August 28, 2011 at 2:58PM
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dgkritch(Z8 OR)

Not Dave, but the 1/4" of stem just keeps the head together.
Otherwise you'll have a bunch of tiny stems with one seed on each floating around in your pickles.
Much easier to remove later if it's all together.

Not a safety issue, just pretty and convenient.

Deanna

    Bookmark   August 29, 2011 at 12:40PM
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terrybull

Procedure: Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch slice off blossom end and discard, but leave 1/4-inch of stem attached.

anyone, this is in the recipe dave posted. why do you do that?

    Bookmark   August 29, 2011 at 5:23PM
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terrybull

someone anyone. got cucs and no plan.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2011 at 5:01PM
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terrybull

bump

    Bookmark   September 1, 2011 at 12:27PM
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2ajsmama

Terry, you remove the blossom end b/c there is an enzyme there that causes softening. You can leave a little stem as a "handle" if you want but not mandatory. Of course for slices you probably want to remove both ends, for spears it's your call. HTH

    Bookmark   September 1, 2011 at 9:49PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Yep - spoilage from enzymes there.

Dave

    Bookmark   September 1, 2011 at 11:27PM
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